TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Apr 16, 2014
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“Success” (from Krazy Kat)

“Success” (from Krazy Kat)

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lonelysandwich:

Ergo dronies

If Kottke says it’s a thing, it must be a thing. As consumer camera drones become more common, this kind of shot (or the one that inspired it by Amit Gupta) will become more familiar. Or this one I made with ominous shadow and a bit of vignette for enhanced drama.

There’s a reason that you’re going to see a lot of these from drone flyers like me, and it’s this: once you get past the novelty of taking a camera high up in the air, getting a bird’s eye view of stuff is actually a little boring.

What birds see is actually a little boring. Humans are interesting. Getting close to stuff is interesting. I bet if we could strap tiny cameras to bird heads, most of what we’d want to look at would happen when they fly close to people. If we could, we’d put cameras on bird heads to take pictures of ourselves.

But try flying your drone close to people. They get freaked out (trust me). Ergo dronies. You want to shoot people, you have to shoot the people you have access to. You end up shooting yourself. It’s not vain, it’s pragmatic.

The next part of the story is the fun part: discovering new things to do with it. New ways to shoot, new shots to get, new moves and new angles. What this feels like to me is that photography was just introduced and enthusiasts are figuring out what a wide shot is and how it feels different from a closeup. Or like the Steadicam was just invented and people are figuring out that running it down a narrow hallway looks really fucking cool.

This doesn’t happen very often, that we find new ways to see ourselves.

Filed under: photography

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Jorge Luis Borges: The Task of Art

The task of art is to transform what is continuously happening to us, to transform all these things into symbols, into music, into something which can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the sometimes joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. Your are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must be transformed, and eventually will be transformed. This revelation can appear anytime. A poet never rests. He’s always working, even when he dreams. Besides, the life of a writer, is a lonely one. You think you are alone, and as the years go by, if the stars are on your side, you may discover that you are at the center of a vast circle of invisible friends whom you will never get to know but who love you. And that is an immense reward.

Thx @robinsloan

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If you have 40 minutes, my SXSW keynote is up.

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Map of Ellen Lupton’s Thinking With Type

I made this back in 2008, and it’s sort of amazing how many of the ideas there were things I ran with that made their way into my own work…

Map of Ellen Lupton’s Thinking With Type

I made this back in 2008, and it’s sort of amazing how many of the ideas there were things I ran with that made their way into my own work…

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Sharing is the whole point of doing creative work.

Apr 15, 2014
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merlin:

How can you not love Lying Cat?

I’m just happy to now know WTF lying cat is. (And now I want a t-shirt.)

merlin:

How can you not love Lying Cat?

I’m just happy to now know WTF lying cat is. (And now I want a t-shirt.)

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Brian K. Vaughan & Fiona Staples, Saga: Volume 1, Saga: Volume 2, and Saga: Volume 3

This series is GREAT. Holy moly. Here’s Vaughn:

I wanted to write about parenthood, but I wanted to Trojan-horse it inside some sort of interesting genre story, to explore the overlap between artistic creation and the creation of a child.

And about the comic’s debt to Star Wars:

I’m part of the generation that all we do is complain about the prequels and how they let us down…And if every one of us who complained about how the prequels didn’t live up to our expectations just would make our own sci-fi fantasy, then it would be a much better use of our time.”

I hadn’t really read any comics in a while, and I’m totally hooked. I read and recommend reading the paper issues (first is only $5), but the first issue is FREE on Kindle.

Seriously, if you’ve never been interested or if you’ve lost interest in comics, check this series out. (And keep tissues nearby if you’re a parent.)

Highly recommended.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

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Karen Russell, Sleep Donation


  America’s great talent, I think, is to generate desires that would never have occurred, natively, to a body like mine, and to make those desires so painfully real that money becomes a fiction, an imaginary means to some concrete end.


I really wish more fiction writers would experiment with digital novellas. This was fun.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Karen Russell, Sleep Donation

America’s great talent, I think, is to generate desires that would never have occurred, natively, to a body like mine, and to make those desires so painfully real that money becomes a fiction, an imaginary means to some concrete end.

I really wish more fiction writers would experiment with digital novellas. This was fun.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

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Hayao Miyazaki - Self Portrait.

Hayao Miyazaki - Self Portrait.

(Source: ghibli-collector, via jedsundwall)

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