TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Apr 15, 2014
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Hayao Miyazaki - Self Portrait.

Hayao Miyazaki - Self Portrait.

(Source: ghibli-collector, via jedsundwall)

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Gary Shteyngart, Little Failure

I thought this was too long, but it made me laugh out loud several times, especially this story about his father, which left me cringing and howling:


  he took my then girlfriend (now wife) to his vegetable garden, where he handed her his biggest cucumber. “Here is something to remember me by”—he winked, adding—“I am big. My son is small.”


If you haven’t read Super Sad True Love Story, I would start there.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Gary Shteyngart, Little Failure

I thought this was too long, but it made me laugh out loud several times, especially this story about his father, which left me cringing and howling:

he took my then girlfriend (now wife) to his vegetable garden, where he handed her his biggest cucumber. “Here is something to remember me by”—he winked, adding—“I am big. My son is small.”

If you haven’t read Super Sad True Love Story, I would start there.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Apr 11, 2014
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There’s about a million miles between saying ‘I have no idea what I’m doing,’ and ‘I’m making it up as I go.’

Apr 07, 2014
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Cosmos, like most pop histories of science, teaches the false narrative that the history of science is that of a few, heroic, lone geniuses doing battle with the masses and forces of institutional darkness.The reality, of course, is that science is a collaborative (and competitive) process, slowly evolving over the centuries thanks to the work of millions of people and supported by large institutions and governments, without which progress would be impossible. Mark Twain put it best in a letter he wrote to Helen Keller:”It takes a thousand men to invent a telegraph, or a steam engine, or a phonograph, or a photograph, or a telephone or any other important thing—and the last man gets the credit and we forget the others.” It’s an important lesson to remember.
Alex Knapp: A Corrective To Cosmos  (via ayjay) (UPDATE: I’ve actually had a few people tweet at me that they got the opposite feeling from watching the series. I, of course, haven’t even seen it yet…)

(via ayjay)

Apr 06, 2014
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I answered some questions Portland asked in today’s newsletter.

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Some photos from my West Coast tour diary.

Apr 05, 2014
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Feedback is great for telling you what you did wrong. It’s terrible at telling you what you should do next.

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You have to learn to be unafraid when you’re a nobody, because you’re going to be really fucking afraid when you’re a somebody and all the lights are on you.

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The Ultimate Fan Extras Collection

mlarson:

lacienegasmiled:

Demo of Beat It composed using only Michael Jackson’s voice

As Jackson couldn’t fluently play any instruments, he would sing and beatbox out how he wanted his songs to sound by himself on tape, layering the vocals, harmonies and rhythm before having instrumentalists come in to complete the songs.

One of his engineers Robmix on how Jackson worked: “One morning MJ came in with a new song he had written overnight. We called in a guitar player, and Michael sang every note of every chord to him. “here’s the first chord first note, second note, third note. Here’s the second chord first note, second note, third note”, etc., etc. We then witnessed him giving the most heartfelt and profound vocal performance, live in the control room through an SM57. He would sing us an entire string arrangement, every part. Steve Porcaro once told me he witnessed MJ doing that with the string section in the room. Had it all in his head, harmony and everything. Not just little eight bar loop ideas. he would actually sing the entire arrangement into a micro-cassette recorder complete with stops and fills.”

Reasons why I laugh when people say he wasn’t a real musician.

Dang. Dude was good.

Incredible.

(Source: harrattanparhar)

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jasontravisphoto:

Austin Kleon. New York Times bestselling author of three illustrated books: Steal Like An Artist, Show Your Work, and Newspaper Blackout. His work has been translated into over a dozen languages and featured on NPR’s Morning Edition, PBS Newshour, and in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.
See his Persona photo HERE / Read more about his items on his blog HERE

Jason is really talented. Check out his stuff.

jasontravisphoto:

Austin Kleon. New York Times bestselling author of three illustrated books: Steal Like An Artist, Show Your Work, and Newspaper Blackout. His work has been translated into over a dozen languages and featured on NPR’s Morning Edition, PBS Newshour, and in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.

See his Persona photo HERE / Read more about his items on his blog HERE

Jason is really talented. Check out his stuff.

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