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Roz Chast on William Steig Steig’s drawings seem...

Sep 04, 2011
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Roz Chast on William Steig

Steig’s drawings seem to flow effortlessly from his mind to his pen and onto the paper. I doubt he ever looked at a blank sheet and thought, “I have nothing worthwhile to say today,” or “I can’t draw a car as well as Joe Shmoe, so why don’t I crawl back into bed and wait for the day to be over.” Steig gave himself permission to be playful and experimental. One of the many wonderful things about looking at his drawings is their message, especially to his fellow artists: Draw what you love and what interests you. Draw it how you want to draw it. When we are children we do this instinctively. But somewhere in our passage from childhood to adulthood, the ability to be truly and fearlessly creative is often lost. To quote Pablo Picasso, Steig’s favorite artist, “All children are artists. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.”

Steig is one of my favorites—Chast’s essay is from a new book on his work, Cats, Dogs, Men, Women, Ninnies & Clowns: The Lost Art of William Steig

Roz Chast on William Steig

Steig’s drawings seem to flow effortlessly from his mind to his pen and onto the paper. I doubt he ever looked at a blank sheet and thought, “I have nothing worthwhile to say today,” or “I can’t draw a car as well as Joe Shmoe, so why don’t I crawl back into bed and wait for the day to be over.” Steig gave himself permission to be playful and experimental. One of the many wonderful things about looking at his drawings is their message, especially to his fellow artists: Draw what you love and what interests you. Draw it how you want to draw it. When we are children we do this instinctively. But somewhere in our passage from childhood to adulthood, the ability to be truly and fearlessly creative is often lost. To quote Pablo Picasso, Steig’s favorite artist, “All children are artists. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.”

Steig is one of my favorites—Chast’s essay is from a new book on his work, Cats, Dogs, Men, Women, Ninnies & Clowns: The Lost Art of William Steig

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    Self-Contempt – William Steig
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  17. calze reblogged this from austinkleon and added:
    Self-Contempt by William Steig
  18. macteenbooks reblogged this from theshipthatflew and added:
    This is dark. Billy Steig definitely has range.
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    William Steig, via austinkleon (image from a new book on Steig’s work, Cats, Dogs, Men, Women, Ninnies & Clowns: The...
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