TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "Alain De Botton"

Nov 08, 2013
Permalink
The process of publishing a book is like telling a joke, then having to wait for 2 years to find out whether it was funny or not.
Alain de Botton (cf. “The Gulp”)

Nov 18, 2012
Permalink
Alain de Botton, Religion for Atheists: A Non-believer’s Guide to the Uses of Religion


  The most boring and unproductive question one can ask of any religion is whether or not it is true…


I was fully prepared to hate this book. I’d never read a de Botton book before, but Mark Larson gave it a thumbs up, and not a whole lot makes me seek out a book like a good review from Mark.

The genesis of the book was de Botton’s thought, “there might be a way to engage with religion without having to subscribe to its supernatural content,” which isn’t, of course, a new thought at all — Thomas Jefferson cut the parts out of The Bible he didn’t like and kept the rest.


  Early Christianity was itself highly adept at appropriating the good ideas of others, aggressively subsuming countless pagan practices which modern atheists now tend to avoid in the mistaken belief that they are indelibly Christian… The premise of this book is that it must be possible to remain a committed atheist and nevertheless find religions sporadically useful, interesting and consoling – and be curious as to the possibilities of importing certain of their ideas and practices into the secular realm.


There are tons of downright goofy ideas in the book, and there were several times where I thought, “Isn’t it just easier to, you know, actual be Catholic?” but what I like is the very simple idea that you don’t have to agree with or believe in something in order to find something valuable and worth stealing in it. Again, go read Mark’s review.

Filed under: my reading year 2012

Alain de Botton, Religion for Atheists: A Non-believer’s Guide to the Uses of Religion

The most boring and unproductive question one can ask of any religion is whether or not it is true…

I was fully prepared to hate this book. I’d never read a de Botton book before, but Mark Larson gave it a thumbs up, and not a whole lot makes me seek out a book like a good review from Mark.

The genesis of the book was de Botton’s thought, “there might be a way to engage with religion without having to subscribe to its supernatural content,” which isn’t, of course, a new thought at all — Thomas Jefferson cut the parts out of The Bible he didn’t like and kept the rest.

Early Christianity was itself highly adept at appropriating the good ideas of others, aggressively subsuming countless pagan practices which modern atheists now tend to avoid in the mistaken belief that they are indelibly Christian… The premise of this book is that it must be possible to remain a committed atheist and nevertheless find religions sporadically useful, interesting and consoling – and be curious as to the possibilities of importing certain of their ideas and practices into the secular realm.

There are tons of downright goofy ideas in the book, and there were several times where I thought, “Isn’t it just easier to, you know, actual be Catholic?” but what I like is the very simple idea that you don’t have to agree with or believe in something in order to find something valuable and worth stealing in it. Again, go read Mark’s review.

Filed under: my reading year 2012

Mar 16, 2012
Permalink
Alain de Botton’s book tour tweets

Getting the jitters about going on such a long book tour, so my agent suggested reading @alaindebotton’s tweets to prepare myself.

Oh, and I just watched Contagion. Not recommended if you’d like to ever leave the house again.

Also, we have the #humblebrag, I think we also need the #worrybrag

Alain de Botton’s book tour tweets

Getting the jitters about going on such a long book tour, so my agent suggested reading @alaindebotton’s tweets to prepare myself.

Oh, and I just watched Contagion. Not recommended if you’d like to ever leave the house again.

Also, we have the #humblebrag, I think we also need the #worrybrag

Jan 18, 2012
Permalink
Most of what makes a book ‘good’ is that we are reading it at the right moment for us.

Dec 15, 2011
Permalink
Being cheerful is really no recipe to get down to work: nothing happens until paranoia, jealousy, competitiveness and guilt arrive.

May 02, 2011
Permalink
slaughterhouse90210:

“It is books, poems, paintings which often give us the confidence to take seriously feelings in ourselves that we might otherwise never have thought to acknowledge.” — Alain de Botton, The Architecture of Happiness

slaughterhouse90210:

“It is books, poems, paintings which often give us the confidence to take seriously feelings in ourselves that we might otherwise never have thought to acknowledge.”
— Alain de Botton, The Architecture of Happiness

Mar 18, 2011
Permalink

Jun 03, 2010
Permalink
The need to diet, which we know so well in relation to food, and which runs so contrary to our natural impulses, should be brought to bear on what we now have to relearn in relation to knowledge, people, and ideas. Our minds, no less than our bodies, require periods of fasting.
— Alain de Botton, “On Distraction

Jul 08, 2009
Permalink
Subscribe to my newsletter and get new art, writing, and interesting links delivered to your inbox every week.