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Posts tagged "Romania"

Apr 20, 2014
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Beautifully intricate Romanian Easter eggs

jkottke:

The small village of Ciocanesti in Romania produces the most beautiful hand-painted Easter eggs I’ve ever seen. This video is a wonderful look at the process and tradition.

First, the (duck, goose, chicken, or even ostrich) egg is drained, through a tiny hole. Then, using a method akin to batik, it is dipped in dye and painted one color at a time, with the painter applying beeswax to those areas she wants to protect from the next round of dying. The painting implement, called a kishitze, is a stick with an iron tip. (Previously, egg-painters would have used thorns or pig bristles.)

And then the wax is melted and wiped off the egg, revealing the colors underneath. So cool. (via @colossal)

This is so wonderful. Must get to the motherland one day.

(Source: vimeo.com)

Feb 11, 2014
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A small-town Romanian cemetery filled with darkly humorous gravestones

This is so good I can’t stand it:

…in the town of Săpânţa, Romania…at the Cimitirul Vesel or “Merry Cemetery,” over 600 wooden crosses bear the life stories, dirty details, and final moments of the bodies they mark. Displayed in bright, cheery pictures and annotated with limericks are the stories of almost everyone who has died of the town of Săpânţa. Illustrated crosses depict soldiers being beheaded and a townsperson being hit by a truck. The epigraphs reveal a surprising level of truth. “Underneath this heavy cross. Lies my mother in law poor… Try not to wake her up. For if she comes back home. She’ll bite my head off.”

You must read the whole story. My favorite line: “Their lives were the same, but they want their epitaphs to be different.”

Do check out the Google+ album of photos

See also the work of Romanian artist Andrea Dezso

(via @thebookslut)

Feb 06, 2013
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Andrea Dezsö’s Embroidered “Lessons From My Mother”

I met Andrea in San Diego last year and was immediately floored by her work. (Also, being 1/4 Romanian but still knowing almost nothing about Romania, I’m always fascinated by Romanian artists.)

NYTimes:

From afar, the stitching and calming colors looked like the work of a doting grandmother, but up close there were images of vaginas, fetuses and a study of the myths that mothers told their daughters in Transylvania, Romania, where Ms. Dezsö, 39, was raised…

Working in the city has provided fodder for many of her ideas and for her embroidery series, which she stitched while traveling throughout the city. A woman stitching in public is viewed differently in different neighborhoods, Ms. Dezsö found.

“If I’m in Queens, people think I’m a traditional woman,” Ms. Dezsö said. “If I’m in Manhattan, it’s the hippest thing.”

See more of Andrea’s work here.

May 26, 2012
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Picasso, the vampire

Here’s a fun art story about the Romanian sculptor Constantin Brâncuși and Pablo “Art is theft” Picasso, from John Richardson’s A Life of Picasso: The Triumphant Years, 1917-1932 (Vol 3).

Brancusi, who’d had several of his sculptural ideas ripped off from Pablo, “was anything but an admirer of Picasso or his work”:

[He] disapproved of [one of] of Picasso’s fundamental characteristics—one that was all too familiar to the latter’s fellow artists and friends—his habit of making off not so much with their ideas as with their energy. “Picass is a cannibal,” Brancusi said. He had a point. After a pleasurable day in Picasso’s company, those present were apt to end up suffering from collective nervous exhaustion. Picasso had made off with their energy and would go off to his studio and spend all night living off it. Brancusi hailed from vampire country and knew about such things, and he was not going to have his energy or the fruits of his energy appropriated by Picasso.

Lynda Barry has a bit where she talks about choosing to hang out with werewolves instead of vampires. I tried to find it online, but all I found was this bit, which I think Brancusi would’ve dug:

Mar 08, 2011
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Street View Romania - Google Sightseeing

Romania has today become the 27th country to receive coverage on Google Street View. Almost 4,000 miles of road has been photographed, capturing sights such as Bran Castle, the probable inspiration for Count Dracula’s castle.

This makes me want to visit the homeland even more.

Street View Romania - Google Sightseeing

Romania has today become the 27th country to receive coverage on Google Street View. Almost 4,000 miles of road has been photographed, capturing sights such as Bran Castle, the probable inspiration for Count Dracula’s castle.

This makes me want to visit the homeland even more.

Apr 22, 2008
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