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Posts tagged "advertising"

Nov 22, 2013
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Kenneth Goldsmith, Seven American Deaths And Disasters

It’s the 50th anniversary of the JFK assassination — one cool read is this book, which includes KG’s transcription of radio broadcasts from the day. You can watch him read the whole JFK section here, but I think the text is much weirder and disorienting.

From Dwight Garner’s NYTimes review:

In his chapter about President Kennedy’s assassination, Mr. Goldsmith tunes in to KLIF, a radio station in Dallas. Ads for Armour Star broad-breasted turkeys (Thanksgiving was approaching) and Falstaff beer segue into “I Have a Boyfriend,” a hit by the Chiffons. He prints the lyrics:

(Boom-sh-boom)

(Boom-sh-boom)

He made a promise

(Boom)

(Whoo-eee-whoo)

He’ll never make me cry

(Boom-sh-boom)

Every time we kiss good night

Feels so good to hold him tight …

Then an announcer cuts in: “This is a KLIF bulletin from Dallas. Three shots reportedly were fired at the motorcade of President Kennedy today near the downtown section. KLIF news is checking out the report. We will have further reports. Stay tuned.”

The station cuts back to “I Have a Boyfriend.” It broadcasts advertisements for pimple cream and a Sandra Dee movie, and plays Tommy Roe’s song “Everybody” before switching over to cover the breaking news.)

Indeed, the ads are some of the best parts:

The first of the two most glorious holidays of the year is coming. So it won’t be long until you make a most important meat purchase.

I mean, those sentences are both completely mundane and super weird—which is exactly what KG is trying to highlight.

(Photos via book designer, Krzysztof Poluchowicz)

Filed under: my reading year 2013

Oct 10, 2013
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For Journalists Who Seek Out Hidden Things, a More Visible Brand

The ad agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners designs a very newspaper blackout-like logo for The Center for Investigative Reporting:


  The idea for the campaign was suggested by “Broken Shield,” a series by California Watch that investigated problems at centers for the developmentally disabled. When reporters received documents they had requested from state officials, “the documents were entirely redacted,” Mr. Bronstein said, “not just the words but the margins.”
  
  “Rich took that redaction notion,” he added, “to deliver the message that we are the antidote to redaction.”
  
  The center’s new logo looks like a redacted document, with everything unreadable except for five words: “the,” “center for,” “investigative” and “reporting.” The logo will appear in numerous places like the center’s Web site, video clips and movie-style posters that promote the center’s reporting.
  
  …The logo is meant to symbolize that “you have to go beyond that blacked-out material to find the truth,” Mr. Silverstein said in a separate phone interview.


I don’t have a comment except, I named the book Steal Like An Artist, not Steal Like An Ad Agency.

(thx @misterdamrauer)

For Journalists Who Seek Out Hidden Things, a More Visible Brand

The ad agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners designs a very newspaper blackout-like logo for The Center for Investigative Reporting:

The idea for the campaign was suggested by “Broken Shield,” a series by California Watch that investigated problems at centers for the developmentally disabled. When reporters received documents they had requested from state officials, “the documents were entirely redacted,” Mr. Bronstein said, “not just the words but the margins.”

“Rich took that redaction notion,” he added, “to deliver the message that we are the antidote to redaction.”

The center’s new logo looks like a redacted document, with everything unreadable except for five words: “the,” “center for,” “investigative” and “reporting.” The logo will appear in numerous places like the center’s Web site, video clips and movie-style posters that promote the center’s reporting.

…The logo is meant to symbolize that “you have to go beyond that blacked-out material to find the truth,” Mr. Silverstein said in a separate phone interview.

I don’t have a comment except, I named the book Steal Like An Artist, not Steal Like An Ad Agency.

(thx @misterdamrauer)

Apr 08, 2013
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Dec 07, 2012
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We started a Web site, but NBC refused to let us put the address on any of our ads because they didn’t want people to know the Internet existed. They were worried about losing viewers to it.

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Dec 05, 2012
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Copycat Movie Posters

Nobody copies like Hollywood and advertising. Put them together? Things get even worse.

But before you get too upset, remember what these posters are for: they’re a kind of visual shorthand for genre. The fact that they all look alike is, to the marketing department, a feature, not a bug.

The first thing I learned as a librarian: you can judge a book by its cover, or at least its genre.

Copycat Movie Posters

Nobody copies like Hollywood and advertising. Put them together? Things get even worse.

But before you get too upset, remember what these posters are for: they’re a kind of visual shorthand for genre. The fact that they all look alike is, to the marketing department, a feature, not a bug.

The first thing I learned as a librarian: you can judge a book by its cover, or at least its genre.

Nov 12, 2012
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Nov 10, 2012
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Have you ever tried to have an idea… with a gun to your head? This is the daily reality for the creative drone.
— Late adman Linds Redding, in “A Short Lesson in Perspective,” a devastating look back at a career in advertising

Sep 09, 2012
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Every piece of fan fiction is an ad for my book. What kind of idiot would I be to want that to disappear?

Aug 19, 2012
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maudnewton:

killingcharlemagne:

Vonnegut’s “How to write with style”.
Series ran by International Paper and included in Spin, January 1986. Pages 20,21.

Oooh, I’ve read transcriptions of this but never before seen the original.

Filed under: Vonnegut

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