TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "age"

May 13, 2013
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The denunciation of the young is a necessary part of the hygiene of older people, and greatly assists the circulation of the blood.

Dec 10, 2012
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I got a baby’s brain and an old man’s heart.
— Alice Cooper, “I’m Eighteen

May 24, 2011
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Fourteen is a sort of magic age for the development of musical tastes…

Dec 08, 2010
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Photos of John Lennon’s first U.S. recording session
                                    
I missed being alive at the same time as John Lennon by 3 years, and he’s been dead for 30 now, which means…OH GOD I’M APPROACHING 30.
Photos of John Lennon’s first U.S. recording session

I missed being alive at the same time as John Lennon by 3 years, and he’s been dead for 30 now, which means…OH GOD I’M APPROACHING 30.

Dec 03, 2010
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Natalie Time Lapse: Birth to 10 years old in 1 minute 25 sec

Couple takes a photo every day of their daughter, from birth to age 10. As always, YouTube comments tilt things towards the dark:

blm2295 - whats sad is just like with just about ever other human she smiles less as the vid progresses

ricerice566 - People flail their arms less as they grow older.

Oct 19, 2010
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There’s no secret about it, really. You just don’t die, and you get to be 100.
— Hazel Miller, quoted in this great NYTimes article on centenarians (via @ideadrop)

Jul 13, 2010
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Jul 01, 2010
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Youth,” by Samuel Ullman

Have it read to you, aloud:

Youth is not a time of life; it is a state of mind; it is not a matter of rosy cheeks, red lips and supple knees; it is a matter of the will, a quality of the imagination, a vigor of the emotions; it is the freshness of the deep springs of life.

Youth means a temperamental predominance of courage over timidity of the appetite, for adventure over the love of ease. This often exists in a man of sixty more than a boy of twenty. Nobody grows old merely by a number of years. We grow old by deserting our ideals.

Years may wrinkle the skin, but to give up enthusiasm wrinkles the soul. Worry, fear, self-distrust bows the heart and turns the spirit back to dust.

Whether sixty or sixteen, there is in every human being’s heart the lure of wonder, the unfailing child-like appetite of what’s next, and the joy of the game of living. In the center of your heart and my heart there is a wireless station; so long as it receives messages of beauty, hope, cheer, courage and power from men and from the infinite, so long are you young.

When the aerials are down, and your spirit is covered with snows of cynicism and the ice of pessimism, then you are grown old, even at twenty, but as long as your aerials are up, to catch the waves of optimism, there is hope you may die young at eighty.

This text is a little different — not sure which is “official.”

The video above was made by my friends, The Butler Bros.

May 14, 2009
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Alice Neel, “Self-Portrait”, 1980Neel had never painted a self-portrait (she said the closest she came was an empty chair by a window), and then at 75 she started this painting, which took her five years to complete. She died four years later at the age of 84.This might be one of those paintings everyone who goes to art school has to look at, but it’s a new image to me.And a wonderful juxtaposition with two quotes I read earlier today on aging and death, respectively.Author Julian Barnes:There is something infinitely touching when an artist, in old age, takes on simplicity. The artist is saying: display and bravura are tricks for the young, and yes, showing off is part of ambition; but now that we are old, let us have the confidence to speak simply.And Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford commencement speech:Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure - these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked.(via Gabrielle Bell in an interview)

Alice Neel, “Self-Portrait”, 1980

Neel had never painted a self-portrait (she said the closest she came was an empty chair by a window), and then at 75 she started this painting, which took her five years to complete. She died four years later at the age of 84.

This might be one of those paintings everyone who goes to art school has to look at, but it’s a new image to me.

And a wonderful juxtaposition with two quotes I read earlier today on aging and death, respectively.

Author Julian Barnes:

There is something infinitely touching when an artist, in old age, takes on simplicity. The artist is saying: display and bravura are tricks for the young, and yes, showing off is part of ambition; but now that we are old, let us have the confidence to speak simply.

And Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford commencement speech:

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure - these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked.

(via Gabrielle Bell in an interview)

Oct 25, 2007
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A friend of mine, who’s slightly older than me, told me, “I don’t even buy green bananas anymore.”
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