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Posts tagged "anders nilsen"

Oct 05, 2013
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The story before ‘The end’ — a conversation with Anders Nilsen

Death doesn’t really make sense. You can try and force it into having a reasonable shape and meaning that fits the human mind, but it will always resist. So if you can’t make sense of it the next best thing is to simply tell the story. Even non-sensical things begin to feel like they make sense when you repeat them over and over. If I had any advice to someone with a friend who just lost a loved one, it might be just to let them tell the story. Be available.

Nice to hear Don’t Go Where I Can’t Follow is back in print — it, like The End, is a beautiful, but devastating, comic.

FIled under: death, Anders Nilsen

The story before ‘The end’ — a conversation with Anders Nilsen

Death doesn’t really make sense. You can try and force it into having a reasonable shape and meaning that fits the human mind, but it will always resist. So if you can’t make sense of it the next best thing is to simply tell the story. Even non-sensical things begin to feel like they make sense when you repeat them over and over. If I had any advice to someone with a friend who just lost a loved one, it might be just to let them tell the story. Be available.

Nice to hear Don’t Go Where I Can’t Follow is back in print — it, like The End, is a beautiful, but devastating, comic.

FIled under: death, Anders Nilsen

Jun 09, 2013
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Jan 11, 2013
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A man named Anders Nilsen shows up to Anders Nilsen’s book signing.

And that’s not the weirdest part…

The book, by the way, Don’t Go Where I Can’t Follow, is wonderful.

Filed under: Anders Nilsen

A man named Anders Nilsen shows up to Anders Nilsen’s book signing.

And that’s not the weirdest part…

The book, by the way, Don’t Go Where I Can’t Follow, is wonderful.

Filed under: Anders Nilsen

Dec 04, 2012
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Anders Nilsen, Don’t Go Where I Can’t Follow

Really happy Drawn and Quarterly is rereleasing this — it’s a heartbreaking and beautiful book. Here’s what I wrote in 2007:

This beautiful little book came out sometime around when Meg and I got married. It is a document of Anders Nilsen’s relationship with his fiance, Cheryl Weaver, who died of hodgkins lymphoma in 2005. It reads somewhat like a heartbreaking, full-color issue of FOUND magazine dedicated to a couple: there are scanned postcards, hand-written letters on notebook paper, ticket stubs, photographs, and of course, Nilsen’s wonderful comics.

Filed under: Anders Nilsen

Jan 11, 2012
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Aug 25, 2011
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Anders Nilsen, “On Whaling,” from MOME, Winter 2006

Anders Nilsen, “On Whaling,” from MOME, Winter 2006

Jun 08, 2011
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Anders Nilsen sketchbook page from Julia Rothman’s new book, Drawn In: A Peek into the Inspiring Sketchbooks of 44 Fine Artists, Illustrators, Graphic Designers, and Cartoonists 

There are some great spreads from the book over at Brain Pickings.

Anders Nilsen sketchbook page from Julia Rothman’s new book, Drawn In: A Peek into the Inspiring Sketchbooks of 44 Fine Artists, Illustrators, Graphic Designers, and Cartoonists

There are some great spreads from the book over at Brain Pickings.

May 07, 2011
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Nashville Review » An Interview with Anders Nilsen

On art school:

Art school certainly has its place. It allows someone who is serious about making art the space and time to devote to work and a forum for feedback about what they are doing. That is potentially invaluable. But in practice art school can be a waystation to house directionless people with vague creative instincts whose families have disposable wealth. It can be a self sustaining institution that protects people from having to think about what they are doing rather than encouraging them to do so. The oft repeated statistic that only 10% of graduate students are still making art ten years on is telling. If a medical school was racking up such statistics, it would go out of business.

On stealing:

The Bible and Greek mythology make up the foundational stories and images of Western culture, and they are still incredibly fertile sources. In a way, I wonder, why should I bother to invent new characters and situations when I can just steal from the masters and get 2500 years of history and gravity thrown in for nothing? And the thing is, I’m as likely as not to be stealing from them accidentally anyway, so why not just surrender and accept my fate?

Nashville Review » An Interview with Anders Nilsen

On art school:

Art school certainly has its place. It allows someone who is serious about making art the space and time to devote to work and a forum for feedback about what they are doing. That is potentially invaluable. But in practice art school can be a waystation to house directionless people with vague creative instincts whose families have disposable wealth. It can be a self sustaining institution that protects people from having to think about what they are doing rather than encouraging them to do so. The oft repeated statistic that only 10% of graduate students are still making art ten years on is telling. If a medical school was racking up such statistics, it would go out of business.

On stealing:

The Bible and Greek mythology make up the foundational stories and images of Western culture, and they are still incredibly fertile sources. In a way, I wonder, why should I bother to invent new characters and situations when I can just steal from the masters and get 2500 years of history and gravity thrown in for nothing? And the thing is, I’m as likely as not to be stealing from them accidentally anyway, so why not just surrender and accept my fate?

Dec 10, 2010
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Sep 22, 2010
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