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Posts tagged "andy warhol"

Nov 01, 2013
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Lou Reed & John Cale, “Work,” Songs For Drella

No matter what I did it never seemed enough
he said I was lazy, I said I was young
He said, “How many songs did you write?”
I’d written zero, I’d lied and said, “Ten.”

"You won’t be young forever
You should have written fifteen”
It’s work

(Source: youtube.com)

Jul 23, 2013
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Warhol would often would say to people, “I’m so empty today. I can’t think of any ideas. Can you give me some?” He would then pretend to listen carefully, ultimately rejecting every idea that was given to him. That’s what made Warhol so great: he wouldn’t take other people’s dumb ideas. He had his own dumb ideas which were really much smarter.
— Kenneth Goldsmith, “Being Dumb”

Apr 28, 2013
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Being born is like being kidnapped.

Dec 27, 2012
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When you do something exactly wrong, you always turn up something.
— Andy Warhol, POPism

Jul 02, 2012
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My notes on a Louis Menand lecture on “The Education of Andy Warhol,” much of it coming from this New Yorker piece :


  The essence of Warhol’s genius was to eliminate the one aspect of a thing without which that thing would, to conventional ways of thinking, cease to be itself, and then to see what happened. He made movies of objects that never moved and used actors who could not act, and he made art that did not look like art. He wrote a novel without doing any writing. He had his mother sign his work, and he sent an actor, Allen Midgette, to impersonate him on a lecture tour (and, for a while, Midgette got away with it). He had other people make his paintings. And he demonstrated, almost every time he did this, that it didn’t make any difference.

My notes on a Louis Menand lecture on “The Education of Andy Warhol,” much of it coming from this New Yorker piece :

The essence of Warhol’s genius was to eliminate the one aspect of a thing without which that thing would, to conventional ways of thinking, cease to be itself, and then to see what happened. He made movies of objects that never moved and used actors who could not act, and he made art that did not look like art. He wrote a novel without doing any writing. He had his mother sign his work, and he sent an actor, Allen Midgette, to impersonate him on a lecture tour (and, for a while, Midgette got away with it). He had other people make his paintings. And he demonstrated, almost every time he did this, that it didn’t make any difference.

Jan 28, 2012
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As soon as you stop wanting something you get it.

Dec 14, 2010
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Songs for Drella

Lou Reed & John Cale, “Hello It’s Me,” off Songs for Drella

What an awesome album.

Oct 19, 2010
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Andy Warhol, Coke Bottles

What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca-Cola, and you know that the President drinks Coke, Liz Taylor drinks Coke, and just think, you can drink Coke, too. A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the Cokes are the same and all the Cokes are good. Liz Taylor knows it, the President knows it, the bum knows it, and you know it.—Andy Warhol, The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (1975)

(via kottke)

Andy Warhol, Coke Bottles

What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca-Cola, and you know that the President drinks Coke, Liz Taylor drinks Coke, and just think, you can drink Coke, too. A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the Cokes are the same and all the Cokes are good. Liz Taylor knows it, the President knows it, the bum knows it, and you know it.
—Andy Warhol, The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (1975)

(via kottke)

Aug 09, 2010
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"Julia Warhola," by Andy Warhol,  1974, silkscreen ink and synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 40 x 40 in., from the collection of The Andy Warhol Museum

From “82 Things You Didn’t Know About Andy Warhol”:


20. Julia Warhola moved to New York to live with her son in 1952. Warhol and his mother would live together until 1971, a year before she passed away.

21. His mother often contributed artistically to Warhol’s paintings, and would sometimes sign them for him.

22. Warhol was a self-proclaimed “mama’s boy.”

Lyrics from “Open House" by Lou Reed and John Cale:

It’s a Czechoslovakian custom my mother passed on to me
the way to make friends Andy is invite them up for tea…It’s a Czechoslovakian custom my mother passed on to me
give people little presents so they remember me

"Julia Warhola," by Andy Warhol, 1974, silkscreen ink and synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 40 x 40 in., from the collection of The Andy Warhol Museum

From “82 Things You Didn’t Know About Andy Warhol”:

20. Julia Warhola moved to New York to live with her son in 1952. Warhol and his mother would live together until 1971, a year before she passed away.

21. His mother often contributed artistically to Warhol’s paintings, and would sometimes sign them for him.

22. Warhol was a self-proclaimed “mama’s boy.”

Lyrics from “Open House" by Lou Reed and John Cale:

It’s a Czechoslovakian custom my mother passed on to me
the way to make friends Andy is invite them up for tea

It’s a Czechoslovakian custom my mother passed on to me
give people little presents so they remember me

Aug 07, 2010
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