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Posts tagged "architecture"

Aug 22, 2014
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Jan 21, 2014
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Le Corbusier’s split personality

Fun fact: the architect Le Corbusier spent his mornings painting in his apartment, and then in the afternoons, he’d go to his office and practice architecture. He said, “Painting every morning is what allows me to be lucid every afternoon.” But even though his work as a painter fed his work as an architect, he took great care to keep the identities separate. He signed all his paintings with his birth name, Charles-Edouard Jeanneret. Supposedly, a journalist once knocked on his apartment door during painting hours and asked for Le Corbusier. LC looked him right in the eye and said, “I’m sorry, he’s not in.”

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Le Corbusier

Filed under: chalkboards

Jan 11, 2013
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The de Menil family’s private home

Man, forget the museum: I want to hang out at the de Menil’s joint and raid their liquor cabinet. (Then I’ll stumble over to the Twombly gallery.)

(Photos by Patrick Cline via Lonny Magazine, Jan/Feb 2013)

Jan 04, 2013
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Nov 13, 2012
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The Bond Villain’s Lair: The Abandoned Island featured in Skyfall


  Hashima is essentially a laboratory for showing what happens to man-made reinforced concrete left in a savage environment. Every year during typhoon season, rain and winds of up to 100 miles per hour eat away at the remnants of a community while huge ocean waves smash directly into buildings that stand like tombstones. Just as it began, a bare rock without any vegitation or human presence, Hashima has gone back to lifelessness.

The Bond Villain’s Lair: The Abandoned Island featured in Skyfall

Hashima is essentially a laboratory for showing what happens to man-made reinforced concrete left in a savage environment. Every year during typhoon season, rain and winds of up to 100 miles per hour eat away at the remnants of a community while huge ocean waves smash directly into buildings that stand like tombstones. Just as it began, a bare rock without any vegitation or human presence, Hashima has gone back to lifelessness.

Sep 24, 2012
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The Cathedral of Junk

This is a fascinating and touching glimpse into the ongoing art installation of Austin, Texas resident Vince Hannemann (aka the Junk King) who since 1989 has been collecting thousands of discarded objects and turning them into a giant cathedral of junk. In 2010 the city closed the structure claiming it was unsafe and demanded Hannemann obtain proper building permits for his “auxiliary structure”. He was then forced to remove nearly 60 tons of materials before finally obtaining the approval from an engineer. Over seven months hundreds of volunteers stopped by to lend a hand and the cathedral has begun expanding once again.

“Playing is like praying.”

Sep 06, 2012
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Architecture and the Lost Art of Drawing

Great essay by the architect Michael Graves, in which he argues for the value of drawing by hand:

For decades I have argued that architectural drawing can be divided into three types, which I call the “referential sketch,” the “preparatory study” and the “definitive drawing.” The definitive drawing, the final and most developed of the three, is almost universally produced on the computer nowadays, and that is appropriate. But what about the other two? What is their value in the creative process? What can they teach us?

The referential sketch serves as a visual diary, a record of an architect’s discovery. It can be as simple as a shorthand notation of a design concept or can describe details of a larger composition. It might not even be a drawing that relates to a building or any time in history. It’s not likely to represent “reality,” but rather to capture an idea.

These sketches are thus inherently fragmentary and selective. When I draw something, I remember it. The drawing is a reminder of the idea that caused me to record it in the first place. That visceral connection, that thought process, cannot be replicated by a computer.

The second type of drawing, the preparatory study, is typically part of a progression of drawings that elaborate a design. Like the referential sketch, it may not reflect a linear process. (I find computer-aided design much more linear.) I personally like to draw on translucent yellow tracing paper, which allows me to layer one drawing on top of another, building on what I’ve drawn before and, again, creating a personal, emotional connection with the work.

With both of these types of drawings, there is a certain joy in their creation, which comes from the interaction between the mind and the hand. Our physical and mental interactions with drawings are formative acts. In a handmade drawing, whether on an electronic tablet or on paper, there are intonations, traces of intentions and speculation. This is not unlike the way a musician might intone a note or how a riff in jazz would be understood subliminally and put a smile on your face.

Interesting to note: Graves mentions that while architectural circles often claim that drawing is dead, original architectural drawings are highly collectible. Yet another example of selling by-products of a process…

Filed under: drawing

Dec 08, 2011
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Ice Cube Celebrates The Eames

They was doing mashups before mashups even existed. It’s not about the pieces, it’s how the pieces work together. You know, taking something that already exist and making it something special. You know, kinda like sampling.

May 04, 2011
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We have to have our dark corners and the unexplained. We will become uninhabitable in a way an apartment will become uninhabitable if you illuminate every single dark corner and under the table and wherever—you cannot live in a house like this anymore. And you cannot live with a person anymore—let’s say in a marriage or a deep friendship—if everything is illuminated, explained, and put out on the table.
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