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A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "art"

Jul 23, 2014
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He picked up a pebble
and threw it into the sea.

And another, and another.
He couldn’t stop.

He wasn’t trying to fill the sea.
He wasn’t trying to empty the beach.

He was just throwing…

Jul 19, 2014
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Don’t make stuff because you want to make money — it will never make you enough money. And don’t make stuff because you want to get famous — because you will never feel famous enough. Make gifts for people — and work hard on making those gifts in the hope that those people will notice and like the gifts.

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Robert De Niro, Sr. and Virginia Admiral

Did you know Robert De Niro’s parents were both painters who met in art school?

Wikipedia:


  At [Hans] Hofmann’s summer school, [De Niro] met fellow student Virginia Admiral, whom he married in 1942. The couple moved into a large, airy loft in New York’s Greenwich Village, where they were able to paint. They surrounded themselves with an illustrious circle of friends, including writers Anaïs Nin and Henry Miller, playwright Tennessee Williams, and the actress and famous Berlin dancer Valeska Gert. Admiral and De Niro separated shortly after their son, Robert De Niro, Jr., was born in August 1943.


See also: the documentary Remembering The Artist: Robert De Niro, Sr.

Robert De Niro, Sr. and Virginia Admiral

Did you know Robert De Niro’s parents were both painters who met in art school?

Wikipedia:

At [Hans] Hofmann’s summer school, [De Niro] met fellow student Virginia Admiral, whom he married in 1942. The couple moved into a large, airy loft in New York’s Greenwich Village, where they were able to paint. They surrounded themselves with an illustrious circle of friends, including writers Anaïs Nin and Henry Miller, playwright Tennessee Williams, and the actress and famous Berlin dancer Valeska Gert. Admiral and De Niro separated shortly after their son, Robert De Niro, Jr., was born in August 1943.

See also: the documentary Remembering The Artist: Robert De Niro, Sr.

Jul 01, 2014
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Ways of Seeing Instagram

Isn’t it striking that the most-typical and most-maligned genres of Instagram imagery happen to correspond to the primary genres of Western secular art? All that #foodporn is still-life; all those #selfies, self-portraits. All those vacation vistas are #landscape; art-historically speaking, #beachday pics evoke the hoariest cliché of middle-class leisure iconography… Technology has so democratized image-making that it has put the artistic power once mainly associated with aristocrats—to stylize your image and project yourself to an audience as desirable—into everyone’s hands.

Wonderful post. (via Alan Jacobs)

Filed under: instagram

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Cy Twombly: A Monograph

Last time I was at the Twombly Gallery in Houston, I struck up a conversation with a woman at the desk — her name, unfortunately, escapes me, but I remember she was very knowledgeable and played the piano — and she gave me a reading list, and this was at the top.

The reproductions are quite beautiful, but I found the writing pretty dry. My favorite story is this one about gallery owner Eleanor Ward:


  In 1953 Mr. Rauschenberg, while working as a janitor at the gallery, showed his now-famous all-black and all-white paintings, to general critical disapproval. He shared his exhibition with Cy Twombly, whose graffiti-based drawings, selling for $50 each and now worth thousands of dollars, drew no takers, despite the efforts of Dorothy Miller, then a curator at the Museum of Modern Art, who urged friends to buy them as Christmas presents.


Ha!

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Cy Twombly: A Monograph

Last time I was at the Twombly Gallery in Houston, I struck up a conversation with a woman at the desk — her name, unfortunately, escapes me, but I remember she was very knowledgeable and played the piano — and she gave me a reading list, and this was at the top.

The reproductions are quite beautiful, but I found the writing pretty dry. My favorite story is this one about gallery owner Eleanor Ward:

In 1953 Mr. Rauschenberg, while working as a janitor at the gallery, showed his now-famous all-black and all-white paintings, to general critical disapproval. He shared his exhibition with Cy Twombly, whose graffiti-based drawings, selling for $50 each and now worth thousands of dollars, drew no takers, despite the efforts of Dorothy Miller, then a curator at the Museum of Modern Art, who urged friends to buy them as Christmas presents.

Ha!

Filed under: my reading year 2014

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If you love something that somebody does—some art, some words, some sounds—you tell them that you love it. You tell everyone how much you love it, repeatedly and enthusiastically. Don’t save your appreciation for later, or worry about wearing people out with your passion. Because the happy truth is this: If a piece of art truly moves you, you will never, ever run out of new adjectives to express how much you love it. Getting to love someone’s art is one of the very finest parts of being alive.

Jun 26, 2014
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thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

Regard the notebooks of Paul Klee

Sincerely,

Professor Chewbacca

design-is-fine:

Paul Klee, Beiträge zur bildnerischen Formlehre, 1922. Bauhaus Weimar.

More PDFs of his notebooks over at Monoskop.

Filed under: Paul Klee

(Source: elisavafreb.wordpress.com)

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bryanwaterman:

ageofwarhol:

DYK Andy Warhol’s mother did the calligraphy for The Story of Moondog (1958). Now help bring Moondog’s story to the big screen! Less than $400 to raise in the last hour!

Almost. There.

Damn Julia had some beautiful handwriting.

bryanwaterman:

ageofwarhol:

DYK Andy Warhol’s mother did the calligraphy for The Story of Moondog (1958). Now help bring Moondog’s story to the big screen! Less than $400 to raise in the last hour!

Almost. There.

Damn Julia had some beautiful handwriting.

Jun 19, 2014
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9 good bits from Adam Phillips’ Paris Review interview

1) “I had never had any desire to be a writer. I wanted to be a reader.”

2) “One thing you discover in psychoanalytic treatment is the limits of what you can change about yourself or your life. We are children for a very long time.”

3) “Fortunately, I never recovered from my education, I’ve just carried on with it. If you happen to like reading, it can have a very powerful effect on you, an evocative effect, at least on me. It’s not as though when I read I’m gathering information, or indeed can remember much of what I read. I know the books that grip me, as everybody does, but their effect is indiscernible. I don’t quite know what it is. The Leavisite position, more or less, is that reading certain sentences makes you more alive and a morally better person, and that those two things go together. It seems to me that that isn’t necessarily so, but what is clear is that there are powerful unconscious evocative effects in reading books that one loves. There’s something about these books that we want to go on thinking about, that matters to us. They’re not just fetishes that we use to fill gaps. They are like recurring dreams we can’t help thinking about.”

4) “You can only recover your appetite, and appetites, if you can allow yourself to be unknown to yourself.”

5) “That’s what a life is, it’s the lives you don’t have.”

6) “I hope you read one of my books because it gives you pleasure or because you hate it—you read it for those sorts of reasons—and then you discover what you find yourself thinking, feeling, in the reading of it.”

7) “You can’t write differently, even if you want to. You just have to be able to notice when you are boring yourself.”

8) “Anybody who writes knows you don’t simply write what you believe. You write to find out what you believe, or what you can afford to believe.”

9) “[I]f you live in a culture which is fascinated by the myth of the artist, and the idea that the vocational artistic life is one of the best lives available, then there’s always going to be a temptation for people who are suffering to believe that to become an artist would be the solution when, in fact, it may be more of the problem. There are a number of people whom you might think of as casualties of the myth of the artist. They really should have done something else. Of course some people get lucky and find that art works for them, but for so many people it doesn’t. I think that needs to be included in the picture. Often one hears or reads accounts in which people will say, Well, he may have treated his children, wives, friends terribly, but look at the novels, the poems, the paintings. I think it’s a terrible equation. Obviously one can’t choose to be, as it were, a good parent or a good artist, but if the art legitimates cruelty, I think the art is not worth having. People should be doing everything they can to be as kind as possible and to enjoy each other’s company. Any art, any anything, that helps us do that is worth having. But if it doesn’t, it isn’t.’

Such a good read.

(Update: my friend Mark Larson has a great AdamPhillips tag.)

May 29, 2014
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Every piece of art I’ve ever made was because I saw bad and could do better, or saw great and needed to catch up.
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