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Posts tagged "art with words"

Mar 25, 2014
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Wendy MacNaughton, Meanwhile in San Francisco: The City In Its Own Words

I’m not jealous of many of my artist friends, but I’m jealous of Wendy.

We both had books come out recently, and they’re both doing pretty well, but her book is an actual WORK OF ART, while mine is ABOUT the work of art.

Why is Wendy so good? She draws her ass off.

She WORKS.

She’s out on the street with a pen and her watercolors, finding stories out in the world. Real stories. She’s doing the work I thought I’d be doing years ago, but somehow got away from.

I’m proud to be her friend, I’m proud of her book, and I’m ready to follow her example and start drawing again.

Time to make art and not just talk about it.

Get this book.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Feb 11, 2014
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A small-town Romanian cemetery filled with darkly humorous gravestones

This is so good I can’t stand it:

…in the town of Săpânţa, Romania…at the Cimitirul Vesel or “Merry Cemetery,” over 600 wooden crosses bear the life stories, dirty details, and final moments of the bodies they mark. Displayed in bright, cheery pictures and annotated with limericks are the stories of almost everyone who has died of the town of Săpânţa. Illustrated crosses depict soldiers being beheaded and a townsperson being hit by a truck. The epigraphs reveal a surprising level of truth. “Underneath this heavy cross. Lies my mother in law poor… Try not to wake her up. For if she comes back home. She’ll bite my head off.”

You must read the whole story. My favorite line: “Their lives were the same, but they want their epitaphs to be different.”

Do check out the Google+ album of photos

See also the work of Romanian artist Andrea Dezso

(via @thebookslut)

Jan 20, 2014
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thinkprocessnotproduct:

Studio Visits: Wayne White

“Catch things that have been falling for a thousand years.”

thinkprocessnotproduct:

Studio Visits: Wayne White

“Catch things that have been falling for a thousand years.”

Jan 09, 2014
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Jean-Michel Basquiat, King Brand (1983) (via)

Jean-Michel Basquiat, King Brand (1983) (via)

Sep 10, 2013
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Mar 13, 2013
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“It’s more complicated than that.”

Edward Tufte, Complicated: yellow, print on canvas, 29 ½” x 29 ½”, edition of 3

“It’s more complicated than that.”

Edward Tufte, Complicated: yellow, print on canvas, 29 ½” x 29 ½”, edition of 3

Mar 03, 2013
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Feb 06, 2013
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Andrea Dezsö’s Embroidered “Lessons From My Mother”

I met Andrea in San Diego last year and was immediately floored by her work. (Also, being 1/4 Romanian but still knowing almost nothing about Romania, I’m always fascinated by Romanian artists.)

NYTimes:

From afar, the stitching and calming colors looked like the work of a doting grandmother, but up close there were images of vaginas, fetuses and a study of the myths that mothers told their daughters in Transylvania, Romania, where Ms. Dezsö, 39, was raised…

Working in the city has provided fodder for many of her ideas and for her embroidery series, which she stitched while traveling throughout the city. A woman stitching in public is viewed differently in different neighborhoods, Ms. Dezsö found.

“If I’m in Queens, people think I’m a traditional woman,” Ms. Dezsö said. “If I’m in Manhattan, it’s the hippest thing.”

See more of Andrea’s work here.

Jul 09, 2012
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A rebus-letter sent by Mark Twain to his wife


  Mark Twain (1835–1910, née Samuel Clemens) wrote essays on art and doodled in his journals, letters, and manuscripts, sometimes to entertain his children and sometimes for his own amusement. In addition, he used his artwork to secure patents for three inventions, including an “Improvement in Adjustable and Detachable Straps for Garments” (to replace suspenders); a history trivia game; and a self-pasting scrapbook coated with a dried adhesive that only needed to be moistened before use.


Read more: The Visual Art and Design of Famous Writers

A rebus-letter sent by Mark Twain to his wife

Mark Twain (1835–1910, née Samuel Clemens) wrote essays on art and doodled in his journals, letters, and manuscripts, sometimes to entertain his children and sometimes for his own amusement. In addition, he used his artwork to secure patents for three inventions, including an “Improvement in Adjustable and Detachable Straps for Garments” (to replace suspenders); a history trivia game; and a self-pasting scrapbook coated with a dried adhesive that only needed to be moistened before use.

Read more: The Visual Art and Design of Famous Writers

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