TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "audience"

Apr 05, 2014
Permalink
Feedback is great for telling you what you did wrong. It’s terrible at telling you what you should do next.

Feb 26, 2014
Permalink

Paul Weller Interviews Curtis Mayfield

Paul Weller interviewing his hero, the late Curtis Mayfield, most likely before Mayfield’s gig at Ronnie Scott’s Jazz club in the Soho area of London on 31st July 1988.

This is a nice little interview. (Puzzled about the Weller connection? The Jam covered Mayfield’s “Move On Up.”)

I like what Mayfield says here about depth:

I like to go in depth as to where I know without a doubt that those who receive me understand me. I know they breathe, I know they cry, I know they’re hurt, I know they love, I know they hate. They have all these different feelings. When you speak in terms of depth rather than ride along the shallow surfaces, they can only give you one true reaction as to what you’re talking about.

What a beautiful man.

Feb 19, 2014
Permalink
Artists shouldn’t kid themselves that most people give a fuck about them directly. At least not at first. People want what you’ve made, they don’t want you. You have to seduce them into also wanting you. And you can only do that by making more stuff that they want, and hopefully attaching yourself to it in the minds of some small percentage of its fans. This is branding.

Permalink
My heroes, from Hank Williams to Frank Sinatra to Bob Dylan, were popular musicians. They had hits. There was value in trying to connect with a large audience… [But] artists with the ability to engage a mass audience are always involved in an inner debate as to whether it’s worth it, whether the rewards compensate for the single-mindedness, energy and exposure necessary to meet the demands of the crowd… [A] large audience is, by nature transient. If you depend on it too much, it may distort what you do and who you are. It can blind you to the deeper resonances of your work and the importance of your most committed listeners.
— Bruce Springsteen, Songs

Feb 17, 2014
Permalink
What an artist is trying to do for people is bring them closer to something, because of course art is about sharing: you wouldn’t be an artist unless you wanted to share an experience, a thought. I am constantly preoccupied with how to remove distance so that we can all come closer together, so that we can all begin to sense that we are the same, we are one.

Jan 20, 2014
Permalink
Faulker, FTW

Faulker, FTW

Dec 14, 2013
Permalink
It comes back to the question, whom are you writing for? Who are the readers you want? Who are the people you want to engage with the things that matter most to you? And for me, it’s people who don’t need it all spelled out because they know it, they understand it. That’s why there’s so much I can’t read because I get so exasperated. Someone starts describing the character boarding the plane and pulling the seat back. And I just want to say, Babe, I have been downtown. (laughter) I have been up in a plane. Give me some credit.

Nov 21, 2013
Permalink
It never fails. You people always like the ones most I like least.

Oct 31, 2013
Permalink
In the early seventies I found myself preferring film soundtracks to most other types of records. What drew me to them was their sensuality and unfinished-ness – in the absence of the film they invited you, the listener, to complete them in your mind. If you hadn’t even seen the film, the music remained evocative – like the lingering perfume of somebody who’s just left a room you’ve entered. I heard Nino Rota’s Fellini soundtracks often before I saw the films and in listening to them I found I could imagine a whole movie in advance: and though it usually turned out to be nothing much like Fellini’s version, it left me with the idea that a music which left itself in some way unresolved engaged the listener in a particularly creative way.

Oct 11, 2013
Permalink
I want to reach out and entertain people. I want people to come to a museum that have never been in a museum before. I want also to have enough art references in it that would satisfy the most sophisticated museum goer.
Wayne White (Or, like I said to somebody recently, “I want the people who never read and the people who think they’ve read everything to both like it.”)
Subscribe to my newsletter and get new art, writing, and interesting links delivered to your inbox every week.