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A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "autobiography"

Apr 15, 2014
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Hayao Miyazaki - Self Portrait.

Hayao Miyazaki - Self Portrait.

(Source: ghibli-collector, via jedsundwall)

Nov 19, 2012
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My autobiography would consist almost entirely of chapters about me sitting alone in a room looking at a typewriter.

Jun 03, 2012
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Whatever we say, we’re always talking about ourselves.

Apr 05, 2012
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Autobiography is only to be trusted when it reveals something disgraceful. A man who gives a good account of himself is probably lying, since any life when viewed from the inside is simply a series of defeats.

Jan 19, 2012
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Saul Steinberg, Autogeography, 1966 (via)

From “Descent from Paradise: Saul Steinberg’s Italian Years”:


  For most of his adult life, Saul Steinberg (1914-1999) drew maps—maps of real or imaginary locations, maps of words and of concepts. Often the maps are of actual places refracted through the artist’s mental constructs, as in View of the World from 9th Avenue, his famous March 29, 1976 New Yorker cover, which, reprinted as a poster, copied, and appropriated for many other cities of the world, became his personal nightmare; even today, it remains the icon that most easily identifies him. There is, however, another splendid map, completed ten years earlier; although intended for The New Yorker, it was never fully published in Steinberg’s lifetime. Entitled Autogeography, it is a bird’s-eye view of a green territory dotted with the names of many locales, large and small, from every corner of the world. A very blue, winding river flows through the territory, and on the bottom right it skirts a small lake with an island. On the island is the word “Milano,” while on the shore northeast of the island we find a locality named “Tortoreto (Teramo).”

Saul Steinberg, Autogeography, 1966 (via)

From “Descent from Paradise: Saul Steinberg’s Italian Years”:

For most of his adult life, Saul Steinberg (1914-1999) drew maps—maps of real or imaginary locations, maps of words and of concepts. Often the maps are of actual places refracted through the artist’s mental constructs, as in View of the World from 9th Avenue, his famous March 29, 1976 New Yorker cover, which, reprinted as a poster, copied, and appropriated for many other cities of the world, became his personal nightmare; even today, it remains the icon that most easily identifies him. There is, however, another splendid map, completed ten years earlier; although intended for The New Yorker, it was never fully published in Steinberg’s lifetime. Entitled Autogeography, it is a bird’s-eye view of a green territory dotted with the names of many locales, large and small, from every corner of the world. A very blue, winding river flows through the territory, and on the bottom right it skirts a small lake with an island. On the island is the word “Milano,” while on the shore northeast of the island we find a locality named “Tortoreto (Teramo).”

Jul 17, 2011
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Jay-Z, Decoded

Some of the best writing about music and art I’ve read in a while. (Read Mark Larson’s review— he gets it right: “I started off a little skeptical, just skimming for pictures and quotes and anecdotes, but then I just had to start over and read it straight through.”) I like what Jay-Z himself has to say about it:

When you’re famous and say you’re writing a book, people assume that it’s an autobiography—I was born here, raised there, suffered this, loved that, lost it all, got it back, the end. But that’s not what this is. I’ve never been a linear thinker, which is something you can see in my rhymes. They follow the jumpy logic of poetry and emotion, not the straight line of careful prose. My book is like that, too.

I tweeted some quotes, but my favorite is probably this one, which I quoted in Steal Like An Artist:

We were kids without fathers…so we found our fathers on wax and on the streets and in history, and in a way, that was a gift. We got to pick and choose the ancestors who would inspire the world we were going to make for ourselves…Our fathers were gone, usually because they just bounced, but we took their old records and used them to build something fresh.

Also, this section on Basquiat really impressed me.

Aw hell, the whole book is good. Read it!

Jay-Z, Decoded

Some of the best writing about music and art I’ve read in a while. (Read Mark Larson’s review— he gets it right: “I started off a little skeptical, just skimming for pictures and quotes and anecdotes, but then I just had to start over and read it straight through.”) I like what Jay-Z himself has to say about it:

When you’re famous and say you’re writing a book, people assume that it’s an autobiography—I was born here, raised there, suffered this, loved that, lost it all, got it back, the end. But that’s not what this is. I’ve never been a linear thinker, which is something you can see in my rhymes. They follow the jumpy logic of poetry and emotion, not the straight line of careful prose. My book is like that, too.

I tweeted some quotes, but my favorite is probably this one, which I quoted in Steal Like An Artist:

We were kids without fathers…so we found our fathers on wax and on the streets and in history, and in a way, that was a gift. We got to pick and choose the ancestors who would inspire the world we were going to make for ourselves…Our fathers were gone, usually because they just bounced, but we took their old records and used them to build something fresh.

Also, this section on Basquiat really impressed me.

Aw hell, the whole book is good. Read it!

Jun 08, 2011
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If I had had to write only about imaginary people, I would have had to close up my typewriter. I wrote about my life in less and less disguise as I grew older, and finally with no disguise — except the disguise we create for ourselves, which is self-deception.

Nov 15, 2010
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Start at no particular time of your life. Wander at your free will all over your life; talk only about the thing that interests you for the moment; drop it at the moment its interest starts to pale.
— Mark Twain, on autobiography writing

(via nprfreshair)

Jul 13, 2010
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Apr 05, 2010
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