TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about. Ask me anything you can't Google.



Posts tagged "blogging"

Aug 12, 2014
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johnmartz:

I have a new Tumblr. It’s about my process and my influences. So: comics, illustration, film, books, writing, and making art. If you like the sorts of things I make, or the sorts of things I used to share on Drawn, you might like it. It’s called The Department of Research and Development.
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I think that’s what artists do when we collect and share links and images. We’re attempting to map a particular world, and a culture, and a set of values that we see our own efforts belonging to. It’s a way to say, “these are my people.” It’s another reason why providing context and sources to the things we share is so important: I want my culture—my people—to thrive.

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This makes me so happy. Follow John’s new tumblr!

johnmartz:

I have a new Tumblr. It’s about my process and my influences. So: comics, illustration, film, books, writing, and making art. If you like the sorts of things I make, or the sorts of things I used to share on Drawn, you might like it. It’s called The Department of Research and Development.

I think that’s what artists do when we collect and share links and images. We’re attempting to map a particular world, and a culture, and a set of values that we see our own efforts belonging to. It’s a way to say, “these are my people.” It’s another reason why providing context and sources to the things we share is so important: I want my culture—my people—to thrive.

Read More

This makes me so happy. Follow John’s new tumblr!

Dec 22, 2013
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These networks are sorted by what things are (a photo, video, snarky quip, etc.), rather than who made them. My brain works in the opposite way. It’s people first, so I don’t think “I would like to see photos,” I ask myself, “I wonder what Josh has been up to?” To find out, I have to visit each little silo and piece the story together.

Dec 21, 2013
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Max Barry, Lexicon

I had A LOT of fun reading this. It’s also a book where you don’t want to miss the acknowledgments, which begin like this:


  Acknowledgments used to be rare glimpses inside the author’s mind when he/she wasn’t trying to lie to you. Stephen King had some of the best. They were long and rambling, like you’d caught him after dinner and a few glasses of wine. I grew up in rural Australia, the nearest bookstore a town away, and Stephen King never toured there, not even on a motorcycle*. I didn’t even realize authors did tours. Acknowledgments were all I had. They were blogs, before blogs were a thing.
  
  Now blogs are a thing, and tweets, and you never need to wonder what any author thinks about anything. Which is a little sad, I feel, for Acknowledgments. They’ve been reduced to a parade of names. Important names, if you are the author, or one of the names. The names are the reason we have Acknowledgments. But still. I liked the rambles.


He then gives this great shout-out to the folks who read his drafts:


  You might think this doesn’t sound too bad, getting a sneak peek at a book, but that’s because you don’t realize how terribly broken my drafts are. Imagine your favorite story, only every so often the characters do stupid things for no reason and then nothing ends like it should. It’s horrible, right? It’s not merely less good; it ruins the whole thing.


Thanks to @kissane for the recommendation.

See all the books I read this year.

Max Barry, Lexicon

I had A LOT of fun reading this. It’s also a book where you don’t want to miss the acknowledgments, which begin like this:

Acknowledgments used to be rare glimpses inside the author’s mind when he/she wasn’t trying to lie to you. Stephen King had some of the best. They were long and rambling, like you’d caught him after dinner and a few glasses of wine. I grew up in rural Australia, the nearest bookstore a town away, and Stephen King never toured there, not even on a motorcycle*. I didn’t even realize authors did tours. Acknowledgments were all I had. They were blogs, before blogs were a thing.

Now blogs are a thing, and tweets, and you never need to wonder what any author thinks about anything. Which is a little sad, I feel, for Acknowledgments. They’ve been reduced to a parade of names. Important names, if you are the author, or one of the names. The names are the reason we have Acknowledgments. But still. I liked the rambles.

He then gives this great shout-out to the folks who read his drafts:

You might think this doesn’t sound too bad, getting a sneak peek at a book, but that’s because you don’t realize how terribly broken my drafts are. Imagine your favorite story, only every so often the characters do stupid things for no reason and then nothing ends like it should. It’s horrible, right? It’s not merely less good; it ruins the whole thing.

Thanks to @kissane for the recommendation.

See all the books I read this year.

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On the “death” of blogging

Earlier this week, Jason Kottke, one of my favorite bloggers, wrote a “ deliberately provocative” obituary for blogging. (More on the piece, here.)

John Scalzi had a great reply:

For the people who want to be able to write longer posts, keep a permanent self-branded outpost, and (importantly) have much more substantial control of their online persona, blogs have no real substitute. I recommend them for writers and other creative folks precisely because they’re your own space… I don’t see myself ever not doing Whatever, because at the end of the day I want to control my own space online and say what I want to be able to say, unencumbered by character limits or SEO-driven advertisements in the sidebars or any other sort of distraction.

Here’s what I wrote about blogs and personal websites in my next book, Show Your Work!:

Related: “Own your turf

Dec 04, 2013
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My dashboard is filled with reblogs of hipster food shots, screen captures of TV shows and soft porn, which is all fine, but I feel like I could be getting more value out of Tumblr if I followed more people who use tumblr like you do i. e. sharing stuff they find interesting and adding their thoughts. I hope it's not too much to ask if you could recommend some blogs that fit the description, if you know any? Thanks!

I would be delighted. Here is a by-no-means-complete list of Tumblrs I enjoy that are regularly updated and function the way you describe (I’ve left out great Tumblrs like SlaughterHouse 90210, Fresh Air, and The Paris Review, etc.):

More of What I Like - by my-brother-from-another-mother Mark Larson

more than 95 theses - Alan Jacobs’ commonplace book.

The Near-Sighted Monkey - Lynda Barry’s tumblr that she keeps for the course she teaches.

Blake Gopnik - Every day Blake posts a piece of art and writes about it.

New Speedway Boogie - Andy Weissman posts music he likes and what he likes about it

I want to also add: what you’re describing is what I’d call Old School Blogging, much of which happens OUTSIDE of the little Tumblr kingdom. Check out:

Matt Thomas

Jason Kottke

Tony Fitzpatrick

Maud Newton

Andy Baio

Again, this is an incomplete list, but it’ll get you started.

Jul 31, 2013
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Part of the job of the artist is to help people discover other great art.

Piece by Ted Hope aimed at filmmakers, but true for all artists, especially authors:

If you make films, it is your responsibility to help others discover what is good to watch. If you love films — or a particular type of film — it is your responsibility to help others learn to appreciate those films too. ”Discovery” is not something you can expect others to EVER do unless you yourself embrace the practice first. ”Spreading the word” is part of a filmmaker’s job description, albeit sincerely & authentically.

Independent filmmaking must be a community activity if it is to survive. You can’t leave good films alone. You have to make it your battle to get those movies seen.

Blogging is a great way to contribute:

I launched this blog and maintain it in hopes that a process of sharing, of collective thinking, transparent effort and experimentation may bring us back to a sustainable enterprise. Through it I have been able to meet many new filmmakers, entrepreneurs, thought leaders, and just generally interesting people. They have helped elevate my work, and I am excited when I can also help them. I like to think that this community effort somehow pushes our rock a bit more up the hill. Filmmaking though is only part of the equation. Film consumption is equally important. Are we helping the good movies get discovered and appreciated?

cf. If you want to be a writer, you have to be a reader.

Jul 26, 2013
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Yeah, I split them in two years ago. My blog is about my work—it almost functions as a portfolio, with new art, events, etc. This tumblr is, as you said, a scrapbook of other people’s stuff. But it’s also a notebook, and a place where I go to form ideas and sort of research in public. For that reason, this Tumblr is probably more interesting than the blog. Funny how that works…

Ask me anything you can’t Google.

Yeah, I split them in two years ago. My blog is about my work—it almost functions as a portfolio, with new art, events, etc. This tumblr is, as you said, a scrapbook of other people’s stuff. But it’s also a notebook, and a place where I go to form ideas and sort of research in public. For that reason, this Tumblr is probably more interesting than the blog. Funny how that works…

Ask me anything you can’t Google.

May 20, 2013
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“There are no stats programs here. There is no like button.”

Michele Catalano writes about moving back to her blog hosted at her original domain, not because Yahoo bought Tumblr, but because she wants to get away from the likes/reblogs as validation trap:

For as long as I have wanted to be a writer – and that’s about 40 long years – there was never any part of that dream that included obsessively checking a page of statistics and judging my self worth by the numbers within. I always wrote for the sheer pleasure of it, from putting that first word down to finishing the final edit, writing has always been a labor of love. Recently, it had become just a labor.

So here I am back at my old domain, the one where I started writing publicly (ok, blogging) in 2001, the one where I started telling my stories to the world. I’m taking the majority of my writing away from tumblr, away from the hearts and reblogs, away from the instant validation. I don’t want to labor anymore. I want to love what I write. I want to love why I write.

There are no stats programs here. There is no like button. I will have no idea how many people will read each post. But I will write and I will learn to love to write again.

I was chatting with Michele on Twitter, and she said, “For the first couple of years I blogged I had no idea how many readers I had. And I was better off for it.” It reminded me of Greil Marcus, talking about the early days of Rolling Stone, when they said, “My God, people are actually paying attention to this. Let’s pretend they aren’t.”

Apr 25, 2013
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When I got out of college, I got a great part-time job in a library with health insurance and worked probably 3 or 4 days a week, and then when I was home, I just read books and dicked around on my blog. (You can still read all those old posts, btw.)

The blog was my anchor. My headquarters. My home planet. My outlet. I could put anything I wanted to on there — for a while I was doing short stories, then I started doing comics, then I started making the blackout poems. Basically, I could do whatever I wanted to and try out anything because I had that blog. Nobody read it in the beginning, but after a few years, people showed up.

And everything good that happened to me came from that blog. I got a web design job because of what I’d done on my blog. I got a book deal and a print setup with 20x200 (RIP) because of the poems I posted online. I got my copywriter job because of my blog. I got my second book deal because of something I posted on my blog.

But I started blogging 8 years ago! That’s not very long at all, really, but it’s super-long in internet time.

I guess what I’m trying to say is: 1) you don’t have to have a plan 2) you just have to stick around for a while.

A few years ago, this thing Jessa Crispin wrote really hit me:


  I’m very Midwestern in that I just do the work that is in front of me. I just did the work that was in front of me for six and a half years. Somehow, there were just always readers, and I’m appreciative that they exist.


I love that. Just do the work that’s in front of you. Pick something that interests you, learn all you can about it, try to get good at it, and then let that thing lead to the next.

When I got out of college, I got a great part-time job in a library with health insurance and worked probably 3 or 4 days a week, and then when I was home, I just read books and dicked around on my blog. (You can still read all those old posts, btw.)

The blog was my anchor. My headquarters. My home planet. My outlet. I could put anything I wanted to on there — for a while I was doing short stories, then I started doing comics, then I started making the blackout poems. Basically, I could do whatever I wanted to and try out anything because I had that blog. Nobody read it in the beginning, but after a few years, people showed up.

And everything good that happened to me came from that blog. I got a web design job because of what I’d done on my blog. I got a book deal and a print setup with 20x200 (RIP) because of the poems I posted online. I got my copywriter job because of my blog. I got my second book deal because of something I posted on my blog.

But I started blogging 8 years ago! That’s not very long at all, really, but it’s super-long in internet time.

I guess what I’m trying to say is: 1) you don’t have to have a plan 2) you just have to stick around for a while.

A few years ago, this thing Jessa Crispin wrote really hit me:

I’m very Midwestern in that I just do the work that is in front of me. I just did the work that was in front of me for six and a half years. Somehow, there were just always readers, and I’m appreciative that they exist.

I love that. Just do the work that’s in front of you. Pick something that interests you, learn all you can about it, try to get good at it, and then let that thing lead to the next.

Mar 26, 2013
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Ed Ruscha’s Books

In the 1960s, Ed Ruscha started putting out his own cheap artist books as a way to get his work out there. The books were “mostly about other everyday sights, like swimming pools, parking lots and palm trees.”

Shunning the elite notion of the “livre d’artiste” — those luxurious, limited-edition works that are collaborations between artists and private presses — he reinvented the genre as something inexpensive, accessible and easy to produce.

The books weren’t precious artworks, they were books, sort of proto-zines:

Mr. Ruscha’s books were not always considered so precious. Mr. Monk remembers his days in the late ’80s as a student at the Glasgow School of Art when he was able to check “Every Building on the Sunset Strip” and books like it out of the library. “I’d take them home, and they got me thinking about this idea of publishing, how you could make something cheap,” he said. “It had a lot of potential.”

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