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A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "captions"

Jan 27, 2014
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Feeds like @HistoryinPics make it impossible for anyone interested in a picture to find out more about it, to better understand what it is showing, and to assess its accuracy.

Mar 15, 2013
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About those 2005 and 2013 photos of the crowds in St. Peter’s Square


  Post photojournalist Nick Kirkpatrick did a little digging and found that the lower photo… which features a sea of smartphones and tablets, was, indeed, taken during the announcement of Pope Francis’s election. But the top photo… which shows an audience with far fewer gadgets was taken during the funeral procession of Pope John Paul II — a very different mood and event type. There was no one addressing the crowd from the balcony, for example. So, the comparison isn’t quite accurate.


As Errol Morris says, to fake a photograph, you don’t need photoshop, all you have to do is change the caption.

But what’s sort of interesting is that the caption wasn’t totally misleading:


  todayshow: How the world has changed: St. Peter’s Square in 2005 and 2013


It’s really the juxtaposition of the two images together into one image that does the “talking.” (As @ayjay put it, “ Never let the facts get in the way of a powerful photo juxtaposition.”) In cases like this, it’s really the “truthiness” of the juxtaposition that makes it spread so fast — it seems true, so we like it. In this way, it’s more like an editorial cartoon…

About those 2005 and 2013 photos of the crowds in St. Peter’s Square

Post photojournalist Nick Kirkpatrick did a little digging and found that the lower photo… which features a sea of smartphones and tablets, was, indeed, taken during the announcement of Pope Francis’s election. But the top photo… which shows an audience with far fewer gadgets was taken during the funeral procession of Pope John Paul II — a very different mood and event type. There was no one addressing the crowd from the balcony, for example. So, the comparison isn’t quite accurate.

As Errol Morris says, to fake a photograph, you don’t need photoshop, all you have to do is change the caption.

But what’s sort of interesting is that the caption wasn’t totally misleading:

todayshow: How the world has changed: St. Peter’s Square in 2005 and 2013

It’s really the juxtaposition of the two images together into one image that does the “talking.” (As @ayjay put it, “ Never let the facts get in the way of a powerful photo juxtaposition.”) In cases like this, it’s really the “truthiness” of the juxtaposition that makes it spread so fast — it seems true, so we like it. In this way, it’s more like an editorial cartoon…

Jan 19, 2013
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If you’re told what to look for, you can’t see anything else. So one thing is to see, in a way, without words…. Once you have an idea, or somebody tells you something to look for, that’s about all you can see. I had this experience recently: A dear friend of ours has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, and I hadn’t seen her for about six months. And when she came and visited, I couldn’t see her anymore. I could only look now for symptoms, how the dementia was manifesting itself. I couldn’t see her through any other lens but the possible symptoms. And that one word, that one piece of knowledge totally corrupted every time I looked at her.

Jan 17, 2013
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Bad lip reading of NFL players

Take footage of NFL players, coaches, and officials talking, dub it poorly with alternate dialogue, and you get a bit of genius.

Really, really funny. Filing this under: captions

Jan 05, 2013
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The numbers say whatever you want them to say. (via @SteveCase)

The numbers say whatever you want them to say. (via @SteveCase)

Sep 04, 2012
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Better Names for Things (via)

Behold, the power of captions.

Jan 28, 2012
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Fig. 1. Gary Larson, “Now! That should clear up a few things around here!” from The Complete Far Side

Fig. 2. A pickup truck on my street.

Filed under: life imitates art, captions

Jul 27, 2011
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Spread from Stefan Lorant’s  Juxtapositions

The book is rare. The text is precious. The illustrations are powerful….The technique is an old one - juxtaposing human figures with animals in a satiric content.The technique is not unique in editorial design. Lorant did this as everything, so memorably. You have to imagine the small magazine (12 x 19cms) opening at the double page spread with no other distraction on the page. 

Don’t miss: “How To Write Captions.”

From Chris Mullen’s terrific website, The Visual Telling Of Stories

Spread from Stefan Lorant’s Juxtapositions

The book is rare. The text is precious. The illustrations are powerful….The technique is an old one - juxtaposing human figures with animals in a satiric content.The technique is not unique in editorial design. Lorant did this as everything, so memorably. You have to imagine the small magazine (12 x 19cms) opening at the double page spread with no other distraction on the page.

Don’t miss: “How To Write Captions.”

From Chris Mullen’s terrific website, The Visual Telling Of Stories

(Source: reblololo, via braiker)

Jul 06, 2011
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Mar 25, 2011
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"Sampling of Bolinas Sky + Fog" from The Bolinas Winemaker by Wendy MacNaughton

"Sampling of Bolinas Sky + Fog" from The Bolinas Winemaker by Wendy MacNaughton

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