TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about. Ask me anything you can't Google.



Posts tagged "caricature"

Jan 19, 2013
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LADYH8RS

One of my very favorite drawers, Warren Craghead, caricatures misogynists. Awesome.

Dec 07, 2010
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Lola Dupré, "The 9th Cat in the White House"

Dupréis a collage artist that manipulates old photos and artworks into weird caricatures. (The cat in this one almost looks like a Steinberg.)

If you dig this sort of thing, check out Stephen Kroninger.

Thx, Public School

Lola Dupré, "The 9th Cat in the White House"

Dupréis a collage artist that manipulates old photos and artworks into weird caricatures. (The cat in this one almost looks like a Steinberg.)

If you dig this sort of thing, check out Stephen Kroninger.

Thx, Public School

Jun 14, 2010
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Feb 02, 2010
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Steve Brodner draws Howard Zinn

I believe he’s drawing with a Sharpie Poster Paint marker?

Dear Mr. Brodner: please make a million more of these videos.

Sep 03, 2009
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Feb 23, 2009
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John Cleese explores caricature and the brain for the BBC, and why it’s easier for folks to identify a person by caricature, rather than a more “realistic” line drawing:

…what the artist is doing is actually mimicking the very processes that are going on in your own brain when you’re looking at any person

[…]

What the brain seems to be doing everytime it looks at a face is searching for differences from the norm. It’s looking for features it can exaggerate and caricature to help it remember the person next time.

Of course, caricature can be the ultimate tool for memory —I’m terrible with names, so I often try to mentally caricature people when I meet them, and also put a big label with their names above their heads (I’ve heard you should write it on their forehead).

Jan 09, 2009
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Dick Tracy villains (via dash shaw)

Dick Tracy villains (via dash shaw)

Oct 22, 2008
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David Levine’s 1966 caricature of LBJ showing off his scar

From a recent NYTimes article on political caricature:

Levine…created a powerful image of President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966 by alluding to an almost trivial incident: Johnson exposing the scar on his belly from a recent gall bladder operation. But Mr. Levine turned the scar into a defining physical characteristic of the man. He also turned it into his defining political characteristic because the scar was a map of Vietnam. The caricature was accurate to the point of prophecy: it showed the wound that was to bring down the president.

More from the article:

Physically, caricature typically takes a particular feature — a hairdo, a verbal tic, a hand gesture, an accent — and exaggerates it, giving it such prominence that we come to see the person in a new and different light….The word comes from the Italian “caricare,” meaning “to overload.” Some characteristic is heavily piled on: the elongated nose, the prominent belly, the bulbous eyes. Caricature seems to have its earliest associations with portraits that showed human subjects to be transformed animals. This can be just a trick of perception, but the art comes from connecting physical characteristics to character, the way Leonardo da Vinci did in his human-animal hybrids. For a great caricaturist, physiognomy is a reflection of the hidden soul: by showing us something exaggerated, something overlooked is revealed.

(Emphasis mine.)

David Levine’s 1966 caricature of LBJ showing off his scar

From a recent NYTimes article on political caricature:

Levine…created a powerful image of President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966 by alluding to an almost trivial incident: Johnson exposing the scar on his belly from a recent gall bladder operation. But Mr. Levine turned the scar into a defining physical characteristic of the man. He also turned it into his defining political characteristic because the scar was a map of Vietnam. The caricature was accurate to the point of prophecy: it showed the wound that was to bring down the president.
More from the article:
Physically, caricature typically takes a particular feature — a hairdo, a verbal tic, a hand gesture, an accent — and exaggerates it, giving it such prominence that we come to see the person in a new and different light….The word comes from the Italian “caricare,” meaning “to overload.” Some characteristic is heavily piled on: the elongated nose, the prominent belly, the bulbous eyes. Caricature seems to have its earliest associations with portraits that showed human subjects to be transformed animals. This can be just a trick of perception, but the art comes from connecting physical characteristics to character, the way Leonardo da Vinci did in his human-animal hybrids. For a great caricaturist, physiognomy is a reflection of the hidden soul: by showing us something exaggerated, something overlooked is revealed.
(Emphasis mine.)

Sep 25, 2008
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