TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about. Ask me anything you can't Google.



Posts tagged "cartooning"

Sep 05, 2014
Permalink
You start when you’re young and you copy. You straight up copy.

Sep 03, 2014
Permalink
dept-of-research-and-development:


One of the many wonderful things about looking at his drawings is their inspirational message, especially to his fellow artists: Draw what you love and what interests you. Draw it how you want to draw it. When we are children we do this instinctively. But somewhere in our passage from childhood to adulthood, the ability to be truly and fearlessly creative is often lost. […] I’m not saying that looking at Steig’s drawings will solve all of anyone’s art problems. Just that giving yourself over to his work is a step in the right direction.

- Roz Chast, from her introduction to Cats, Dogs, Men, Women, Ninnies & Clowns: The Lost Art of William Steig

Steig is so great.

dept-of-research-and-development:

One of the many wonderful things about looking at his drawings is their inspirational message, especially to his fellow artists: Draw what you love and what interests you. Draw it how you want to draw it. When we are children we do this instinctively. But somewhere in our passage from childhood to adulthood, the ability to be truly and fearlessly creative is often lost. […] I’m not saying that looking at Steig’s drawings will solve all of anyone’s art problems. Just that giving yourself over to his work is a step in the right direction.

- Roz Chast, from her introduction to Cats, Dogs, Men, Women, Ninnies & Clowns: The Lost Art of William Steig

Steig is so great.

Sep 02, 2014
Permalink
An artist of any sort… you must not put down the man before you. It’s like putting down the guy who built the ladder you’re standing on. Without him, you’re standing on the floor. With him, naturally you’re above him, because he’s holding you on his shoulders. You devour his stuff. You eat it up. And then you move one step higher. A lot of cartoonists, I’ll take all the originality they’ve got, and all their ideas, and swallow them, and then I’ll try to move one step further. That doesn’t mean I could’ve done it without their influence or their help. Because, eventually, some guy’s going to be standing on my shoulders…
Shel Silverstein, in a wonderful interview with Studs Terkel

Aug 01, 2014
Permalink
Peanuts, August 8, 1981

@jndevereux:


  I love the way Schulz drew clouds and the sun in this Peanuts


Me too. One thing to note: Schulz actually had a hand tremor. He once complained (supposedly in the 1980s, the same decade this strip was drawn, although I can’t find the exact source) that “sometimes my hand shakes so much I have to hold my wrist to draw.”  I’m not sure when it really started to show in his work. If you pick up a collection like A Golden Celebration, you can definitely see that his line gets more wobbly and loose over the years, but things are still reasonably tight in the 80s. (It’s hard to tell, honestly, since the drawings were always so reduced for the paper. You can see how big he worked here.) Might have to add Schulz to my list of artists whose physical shortcomings led to signature work.

Regardless, these panels rule.

Filed under: Peanuts

Peanuts, August 8, 1981

@jndevereux:

I love the way Schulz drew clouds and the sun in this Peanuts

Me too. One thing to note: Schulz actually had a hand tremor. He once complained (supposedly in the 1980s, the same decade this strip was drawn, although I can’t find the exact source) that “sometimes my hand shakes so much I have to hold my wrist to draw.”  I’m not sure when it really started to show in his work. If you pick up a collection like A Golden Celebration, you can definitely see that his line gets more wobbly and loose over the years, but things are still reasonably tight in the 80s. (It’s hard to tell, honestly, since the drawings were always so reduced for the paper. You can see how big he worked here.) Might have to add Schulz to my list of artists whose physical shortcomings led to signature work.

Regardless, these panels rule.

Filed under: Peanuts

Jul 03, 2014
Permalink
Bob Mankoff, How About Never—Is Never Good for You?: My Life in Cartoons

Booklist got it right:


  In a witty mix of memoir and New Yorker cartoon history exuberantly illustrated with New Yorker cartoons past and present, Mankoff discusses his mother’s complicated influence (“Humor thrives on conflict”), how his psychology background helps him understand what makes cartoons funny or thought-provoking, and why he created the Cartoon Bank, which transformed the profession. He also unveils the magazine’s cartoon selection process under editors William Shawn, Tina Brown, and David Remnick and describes his own rigorous assessment of 1,000 cartoons a week. Other cartoonists describe their working methods, and Mankoff even offers inside information on the New Yorker’s devilishly difficult Cartoon Caption Contest, which the late great movie critic Roger Ebert won in 2011 “after 107 tries.” A cartoon lover’s feast.


I particularly liked the bits where Bob talks about how the humor in cartoons works, and how the cartoonists themselves work:


  In cartooning, as in life, nine out of ten things don’t work out… 
  To get good ideas in any field, the best method is to generate lots of ideas and throw out the bad ones.


He then points to something that I’d always suspected: that there are writing-first cartoonists and drawing-first cartoonists:


  Different cartoonists have different was of getting quality from quantity. One division is between the doodle firsters and the word firsters. The doodle firsters doodle away until a drawing inspires something funny, while the words first people write, write, and write some more until something clicks.


(For a great example of the process of a word-firster, check out my friend Matt Diffee’s TED talk.)

The other thing I love about this book is how informed it seems to be by Mankoff’s blogging — it reads like a really lean, well-edited blog post, with cartoons tossed in the stream at any point they need to be to illustrate the point. It’s fast reading that also rewards re-reading, which is a hard thing to pull off.

If you’re at all interested in The New Yorker, cartooning, or how humor works, this is a really great read.

Recommended.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Bob Mankoff, How About Never—Is Never Good for You?: My Life in Cartoons

Booklist got it right:

In a witty mix of memoir and New Yorker cartoon history exuberantly illustrated with New Yorker cartoons past and present, Mankoff discusses his mother’s complicated influence (“Humor thrives on conflict”), how his psychology background helps him understand what makes cartoons funny or thought-provoking, and why he created the Cartoon Bank, which transformed the profession. He also unveils the magazine’s cartoon selection process under editors William Shawn, Tina Brown, and David Remnick and describes his own rigorous assessment of 1,000 cartoons a week. Other cartoonists describe their working methods, and Mankoff even offers inside information on the New Yorker’s devilishly difficult Cartoon Caption Contest, which the late great movie critic Roger Ebert won in 2011 “after 107 tries.” A cartoon lover’s feast.

I particularly liked the bits where Bob talks about how the humor in cartoons works, and how the cartoonists themselves work:

In cartooning, as in life, nine out of ten things don’t work out… To get good ideas in any field, the best method is to generate lots of ideas and throw out the bad ones.

He then points to something that I’d always suspected: that there are writing-first cartoonists and drawing-first cartoonists:

Different cartoonists have different was of getting quality from quantity. One division is between the doodle firsters and the word firsters. The doodle firsters doodle away until a drawing inspires something funny, while the words first people write, write, and write some more until something clicks.

(For a great example of the process of a word-firster, check out my friend Matt Diffee’s TED talk.)

The other thing I love about this book is how informed it seems to be by Mankoff’s blogging — it reads like a really lean, well-edited blog post, with cartoons tossed in the stream at any point they need to be to illustrate the point. It’s fast reading that also rewards re-reading, which is a hard thing to pull off.

If you’re at all interested in The New Yorker, cartooning, or how humor works, this is a really great read.

Recommended.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Jul 02, 2014
Permalink
austinkleon:

Out of the way, you swine! A cartoonist is coming!

Cartoon by B. Kliban via @comicsreporter. Filed under: pity the poor cartoonist

EVERY time I see this cartoon it makes me laugh.

austinkleon:

Out of the way, you swine! A cartoonist is coming!

Cartoon by B. Kliban via @comicsreporter. Filed under: pity the poor cartoonist

EVERY time I see this cartoon it makes me laugh.

Jun 20, 2014
Permalink

RIP cartoonist Charles Barsotti 1933-2014

My favorite signature in the New Yorker. He grew up just down the road:

Charles Barsotti – or “Charley,” as nearly everyone called him – was born September 28, 1933, in San Marcos, Texas. “Everything down there either had thorns on it or bit,” he said of his hometown when I interviewed him in January 2013, “and that includes the adults.” Howard, his father, sold furniture in San Antonio, where Charley was raised. His mother, the delightfully named Dicey Belle Branum, was a schoolteacher. Barsotti credited his hard-working parents with inspiring his own determined work ethic. “That, and fear,” he added.

If you’re unfamiliar with his work, Bob Mankoff has a nice small gallery of his cartoons, and there’s a collection called, simply, The Essential Charles Barsotti.

Jun 15, 2014
Permalink
newyorker:

The cartoonist Paul Karasik explains why his candidate for the perfect cartoon is this classic by Peter Arno: http://nyr.kr/1itW3KY

Arno is amazing. I love this era of New Yorker cartooning. (See also: Charles Addams)

newyorker:

The cartoonist Paul Karasik explains why his candidate for the perfect cartoon is this classic by Peter Arno: http://nyr.kr/1itW3KY

Arno is amazing. I love this era of New Yorker cartooning. (See also: Charles Addams)

(Source: newyorker.com)

Nov 03, 2013
Permalink

thenearsightedmonkey:

"Let’s Draw a Car and then Let’s Draw Batman"

A comics essay by Lynda Barry

Illustrations retrieved from materials discarded by participants in Lynda Barry’s writing workshop at The Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Fall 2013

Filed under: Lynda Barry

Oct 25, 2013
Permalink

Let my very funny friend Matt Diffee, he of New Yorker fame, teach you how to get a great idea.

See also: Frank Chimero’s “How To Have An Idea”

Subscribe to my newsletter and get new art, writing, and interesting links delivered to your inbox every week.