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A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about. Ask me anything you can't Google.



Posts tagged "chalkboards"

Jan 21, 2014
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Le Corbusier

Filed under: chalkboards

Apr 08, 2013
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propaedeuticist:

At NASA’s Drawing Board - J R Eyerman

Reblogging just so I can resurrect the “chalkboards” tag

(Source: propaedeuticist, via wnycradiolab)

Nov 05, 2012
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Bill Murray at the chalkboard

willbryantplz:

my kind of education. 

Bill Murray at the chalkboard

willbryantplz:

my kind of education. 

(Source: colt-rane)

Oct 19, 2012
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thenearsightedmonkey:

Marks made by the original digital device—

Why use a blackboard to sort out aspects of quantum mechanics?

proofmathisbeautiful:

likeafieldmouse:

Alejandro Guijarro - Momentum (2010-12)

“The artist travelled to the great quantum mechanics institutions of the world and, using a large-format camera, photographed blackboards as he found them. Momentum displayed the photographs in life-size. 

Before he walked into a lecture hall Guijarro had no idea what he might find. He began by recording the blackboard with the minimum of interference. No detail of the lecture hall was included, the blackboard frame was removed and we are left with a surface charged with abstract equations. Effectively these are documents. Yet once removed from their institutional beginnings the meaning evolves. The viewer begins to appreciate the equations for their line and form. Color comes into play and the waves created by the blackboard eraser suggest a vast landscape or galactic setting. The formulas appear to illustrate the worlds of Quantum Mechanics. What began as a precise lecture, a description of the physicist’s thought process, is transformed into a canvas open to any number of possibilities.”

1. Cambridge (2011)

2. Stanford (2012)

3. Berkeley I (2012)

4. Berkeley II (2012)

5. Oxford (2011)

I LOVE THIS!!!

Filed under: chalkboards

(Source: likeafieldmouse)

Oct 02, 2012
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Barry Commoner Dies at 95 - NYTimes.com

He was called “the Paul Revere of Environmentalism.”


  His four informal rules of ecology were catchy enough to print on a T-shirt and take to the street: Everything is connected to everything else. Everything must go somewhere. Nature knows best. There is no such thing as a free lunch.


That’s the second great Marxist we’ve lost this week at the age of 95. RIP.

Filed under: chalkboards, obituaries

Barry Commoner Dies at 95 - NYTimes.com

He was called “the Paul Revere of Environmentalism.”

His four informal rules of ecology were catchy enough to print on a T-shirt and take to the street: Everything is connected to everything else. Everything must go somewhere. Nature knows best. There is no such thing as a free lunch.

That’s the second great Marxist we’ve lost this week at the age of 95. RIP.

Filed under: chalkboards, obituaries

Sep 22, 2012
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? SMALL BUSINESS

Screenshot from Let There Be Light (YouTube) John Huston’s 1946 documentary about soldiers returning from World War II with PTSD. Paul Thomas Anderson claims it was a major influence on The Master — and admitted, “There’s stuff that we kind of ripped off, line for line, from that film.”

? SMALL BUSINESS

Screenshot from Let There Be Light (YouTube) John Huston’s 1946 documentary about soldiers returning from World War II with PTSD. Paul Thomas Anderson claims it was a major influence on The Master — and admitted, “There’s stuff that we kind of ripped off, line for line, from that film.”

May 14, 2012
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The chalk talks of Dr. Chevalier Jackson

When I was in the Mutter Museum in Philadelphia, my eye was caught by a chalk drawing of a larynx by Dr. Chevalier Jackson. Jackson was a laryngologist who preserved more than 2,000 swallowed objects that he had removed (often without anesthesia!) from his patients. The collection is in a bunch of flat files at the Mutter.

Even more interesting to me, Dr. Jackson was trained as a visual artist, “known during his lifetime as much for his “chalk talks”—lively lectures accompanied by visual aid of colorful illustrative sketches that he would make on the spot—as for [foreign body] removal. Copies of the sketches became coveted collectors’ items among his students.” (Indeed: while Googling, I found an original drawing on sale on Etsy. Only $850!)

Jackson’s story is recalled in Mary Cappello’s Swallow: Foreign Bodies, Their Ingestion, Inspiration, and the Curious Doctor Who Extracted Them:

Those students who attended Jackson’s famous on-the-spot ambidextrous “chalk talks” went away dazzled and changed by the rare opportunity to bear witness, in a sense, to Jackson in repeated acts of first seeing and then remaking what he saw through his scopes in the forms of many-times-magnified chalk-pastel renderings. In this way, Jackson “worked up” the bodies that he treated, but not in the sense that medicine uses that phrase now. This was not a stats-gathering procedure, a collation, or a keeping of tabs. As if by magic, he brought the body’s insides to light, as light. Jackson’s hands were his imaging technology and they made for a unique pedagogical encounter irreducible to what we now think of as proplike visual “aids.” The Jacksonian chalk talks exerted a curiously hands-on seeing-feeling identification between student and teacher that was impossible to reproduce, for its emphasis was on medical practice not simply as a way of seeing bodies or acting upon bodies, ill or well, but of making bodies.

Imagine if we could see one of those chalk talks today! In another passage in Cappello’s book, she highlights the fact that art and science were woven together in Jackson’s practice:

Jackson said the only thing that kept him from pursuing art professionally was the fear of failure, starvation, and subsequent hunger. But Jackson’s art-making was not opposed to or exclusive of his medical practice. Jackson understood the manual dexterity required by painting to be in every way commensurate with the training of the hands and eyes called for by his endoscopic work.

Sounds like an amazing mind. I look forward to reading more about him in Swallow.

UPDATE: Professor Cappello sent me this footage of Professor Jackson giving a lecture!

Mar 14, 2012
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thenearsightedmonkey:

Last Thursday, Matt Groening visited Lynda Barry’s “What It Is” class at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Later he joined her on stage at Madison’s Museum of Contemporary art to talk about his Life in Hell comic strip and the the friendship they’ve shared for over 30 years.

Photographs by Angela Richardson, AKA Bucca 4 of Hearts

Note: The slide in the last photo is of Matt Groening and Lynda Barry in about 1984. Lynda Barry is the one in drag.

Awesome.

Jan 09, 2012
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Great physicists and their blackboards.

Fantastic! For a while I was collecting these at The Art of Chalkboards, but now I just keep these tags:

via wnycradiolab > quantumpie > nabokovsnotebook

Nov 10, 2011
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Arthur Leipzig, “Chalk Games,” 1950, Prospect Place, Brooklyn, from The Radical Camera

Filed under: chalkboards (via braiker + The Daily Mail)

Arthur Leipzig, “Chalk Games,” 1950, Prospect Place, Brooklyn, from The Radical Camera

Filed under: chalkboards (via braiker + The Daily Mail)

(Source: oldchum)

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