TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about. Ask me anything you can't Google.



Posts tagged "comics"

Oct 05, 2014
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Daniel Clowes’ cover for the Penguin Classics edition of Frankenstein

From Frankensteinia:

In a November 2007 interview with the Regina Leader-Post, Clowes revealed that he picked Frankenstein to illustrate after having an operation to repair a defective heart valve.

“I felt a very great kinship with the poor fellow after my operation” Clowes said. “… my blood is finally pumping as it should, I feel totally reinvigorated and I have this ghastly Frankenstein scar that I can scare my son with.”

The paperback is a steal, btw.

Sep 30, 2014
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thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.

In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?

Read more here….

Filed under: comics

Sep 26, 2014
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Richard McGuire’s Here

NYTimes:

In 1989, Mr. McGuire, then an aspiring New York artist better known for playing bass in the postpunk band Liquid Liquid, published a 36-panel comic that hopped backward and forward through millions of years without leaving the confines of a suburban living room, thanks to the use of pop-up frames-within-frames inspired by the relatively new Microsoft Windows… now he has popped up through a wormhole of his own, with a full-color, book-length version of “Here” that once again transforms a corner of his childhood living room in New Jersey into a staging ground for all of earthly history.

Each two-page spread features a fixed view of the room in a certain year, with pop-up windows giving glimpses of what might have been visible in exactly that spot at various moments in the past and future: from the tail of a passing dinosaur to a 1960s children’s birthday party to a quiet late-21st-century fireside chat.

McGuire is amazing. I’m thinking of flying to NYC just to see the show. Don’t miss it if you’re there.

I pre-ordered the shit out of this.

Sep 20, 2014
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The Bechdel Test

Alison Bechdel’s original 1985 Dykes To Watch Out For strip that became known as “The Bechdel Test.”

The Bechdel Test

Alison Bechdel’s original 1985 Dykes To Watch Out For strip that became known as “The Bechdel Test.”

Sep 16, 2014
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Cyril Pedrosa, Three Shadows

Some of the most beautiful drawing I’ve seen in a comic — no surprise that Pedrosa used to be a Disney animator. He’s sort of hard to find online, but you can see some of his old Moleskines here, and a nice, short interview about the book.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Sep 15, 2014
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“I make places I want to go to.”

Renee French drawn at SPX by the great Warren Craghead.

Reminds me of the last line of William Burroughs’ Paris Review interview:


  I’m creating an imaginary—it’s always imaginary—world in which I would like to live.

“I make places I want to go to.”

Renee French drawn at SPX by the great Warren Craghead.

Reminds me of the last line of William Burroughs’ Paris Review interview:

I’m creating an imaginary—it’s always imaginary—world in which I would like to live.

Sep 13, 2014
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Roz Chast, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

Wonderful book. Sad, of course, but so, so funny, too. (Made me literally LOL several times.) Read an excerpt here.

Recommended.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Roz Chast, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

Wonderful book. Sad, of course, but so, so funny, too. (Made me literally LOL several times.) Read an excerpt here.

Recommended.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Sep 08, 2014
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Alison Bechdel, Are You My Mother?

Ken Parille has some really smart observations about this book:


  More than any other graphic novel I’ve read, the book records the process of its own organization; it’s a “metabook,” as Bechdel’s mother calls it. It’s all about patterns, correspondences, similarities that Bechdel obsessively organizes into an archive of (hopefully) meaningful experience (with more telling than showing). […] Are You My Mother? is a material graphic archive, with transcriptions of personal experiences, psychoanalytical reflections, recounted memories of other people, along with excerpts from letters, journals, newspapers, and the writings of Winnicott, Woolf, Adrienne Rich, and others, all rigorously interpolated and neatly organized. It treats life as a kind of research project that, to validate itself, must be perfected, visually and structurally. It’s a fascinating look into a cartoonist’s thought process and a book’s difficult creation…It’s a process memoir, both for Fun Home and Are You My Mother?


The book made me want to read more D.W. Winnicott and Alice Miller’s The Drama of the Gifted Child.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Alison Bechdel, Are You My Mother?

Ken Parille has some really smart observations about this book:

More than any other graphic novel I’ve read, the book records the process of its own organization; it’s a “metabook,” as Bechdel’s mother calls it. It’s all about patterns, correspondences, similarities that Bechdel obsessively organizes into an archive of (hopefully) meaningful experience (with more telling than showing). […] Are You My Mother? is a material graphic archive, with transcriptions of personal experiences, psychoanalytical reflections, recounted memories of other people, along with excerpts from letters, journals, newspapers, and the writings of Winnicott, Woolf, Adrienne Rich, and others, all rigorously interpolated and neatly organized. It treats life as a kind of research project that, to validate itself, must be perfected, visually and structurally. It’s a fascinating look into a cartoonist’s thought process and a book’s difficult creation…It’s a process memoir, both for Fun Home and Are You My Mother?

The book made me want to read more D.W. Winnicott and Alice Miller’s The Drama of the Gifted Child.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Sep 03, 2014
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kochalka:

James Kochalka on Being Creative

“The main inhibitor for creativity is just being scared… if you’re worried that what you’re gonna do is not good enough, then you just don’t do it. That’s what “writer’s block” really is: people say, “Oh, I don’t have any ideas.” It’s not that you don’t have ideas, you’ve got tons of ideas, you’re afraid they’re not good enough.”

James has long been one of my favorite cartoonists. Two of his pieces of writing had a big impact on me early on: “Craft is the enemy” and “The Horrible Truth About Comics,” both of which are in his great book, The Cute Manifesto. (Fun fact: the original dummy book for Steal Like An Artist was just a copy of The Cute Manifesto with a dust jacket.)

If you haven’t read American Elf, it’s one of my favorite comics, ever. Start with volume one.

Filed under: james kochalka

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dept-of-research-and-development:


One of the many wonderful things about looking at his drawings is their inspirational message, especially to his fellow artists: Draw what you love and what interests you. Draw it how you want to draw it. When we are children we do this instinctively. But somewhere in our passage from childhood to adulthood, the ability to be truly and fearlessly creative is often lost. […] I’m not saying that looking at Steig’s drawings will solve all of anyone’s art problems. Just that giving yourself over to his work is a step in the right direction.

- Roz Chast, from her introduction to Cats, Dogs, Men, Women, Ninnies & Clowns: The Lost Art of William Steig

Steig is so great.

dept-of-research-and-development:

One of the many wonderful things about looking at his drawings is their inspirational message, especially to his fellow artists: Draw what you love and what interests you. Draw it how you want to draw it. When we are children we do this instinctively. But somewhere in our passage from childhood to adulthood, the ability to be truly and fearlessly creative is often lost. […] I’m not saying that looking at Steig’s drawings will solve all of anyone’s art problems. Just that giving yourself over to his work is a step in the right direction.

- Roz Chast, from her introduction to Cats, Dogs, Men, Women, Ninnies & Clowns: The Lost Art of William Steig

Steig is so great.

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