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A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "comics"

Sep 16, 2014
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Cyril Pedrosa, Three Shadows

Some of the most beautiful drawing I’ve seen in a comic — no surprise that Pedrosa used to be a Disney animator. He’s sort of hard to find online, but you can see some of his old Moleskines here, and a nice, short interview about the book.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Sep 15, 2014
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“I make places I want to go to.”

Renee French drawn at SPX by the great Warren Craghead.

Reminds me of the last line of William Burroughs’ Paris Review interview:


  I’m creating an imaginary—it’s always imaginary—world in which I would like to live.

“I make places I want to go to.”

Renee French drawn at SPX by the great Warren Craghead.

Reminds me of the last line of William Burroughs’ Paris Review interview:

I’m creating an imaginary—it’s always imaginary—world in which I would like to live.

Sep 13, 2014
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Roz Chast, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

Wonderful book. Sad, of course, but so, so funny, too. (Made me literally LOL several times.) Read an excerpt here.

Recommended.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Roz Chast, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

Wonderful book. Sad, of course, but so, so funny, too. (Made me literally LOL several times.) Read an excerpt here.

Recommended.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Sep 08, 2014
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Alison Bechdel, Are You My Mother?

Ken Parille has some really smart observations about this book:


  More than any other graphic novel I’ve read, the book records the process of its own organization; it’s a “metabook,” as Bechdel’s mother calls it. It’s all about patterns, correspondences, similarities that Bechdel obsessively organizes into an archive of (hopefully) meaningful experience (with more telling than showing). […] Are You My Mother? is a material graphic archive, with transcriptions of personal experiences, psychoanalytical reflections, recounted memories of other people, along with excerpts from letters, journals, newspapers, and the writings of Winnicott, Woolf, Adrienne Rich, and others, all rigorously interpolated and neatly organized. It treats life as a kind of research project that, to validate itself, must be perfected, visually and structurally. It’s a fascinating look into a cartoonist’s thought process and a book’s difficult creation…It’s a process memoir, both for Fun Home and Are You My Mother?


The book made me want to read more D.W. Winnicott and Alice Miller’s The Drama of the Gifted Child.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Alison Bechdel, Are You My Mother?

Ken Parille has some really smart observations about this book:

More than any other graphic novel I’ve read, the book records the process of its own organization; it’s a “metabook,” as Bechdel’s mother calls it. It’s all about patterns, correspondences, similarities that Bechdel obsessively organizes into an archive of (hopefully) meaningful experience (with more telling than showing). […] Are You My Mother? is a material graphic archive, with transcriptions of personal experiences, psychoanalytical reflections, recounted memories of other people, along with excerpts from letters, journals, newspapers, and the writings of Winnicott, Woolf, Adrienne Rich, and others, all rigorously interpolated and neatly organized. It treats life as a kind of research project that, to validate itself, must be perfected, visually and structurally. It’s a fascinating look into a cartoonist’s thought process and a book’s difficult creation…It’s a process memoir, both for Fun Home and Are You My Mother?

The book made me want to read more D.W. Winnicott and Alice Miller’s The Drama of the Gifted Child.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Sep 03, 2014
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kochalka:

James Kochalka on Being Creative

“The main inhibitor for creativity is just being scared… if you’re worried that what you’re gonna do is not good enough, then you just don’t do it. That’s what “writer’s block” really is: people say, “Oh, I don’t have any ideas.” It’s not that you don’t have ideas, you’ve got tons of ideas, you’re afraid they’re not good enough.”

James has long been one of my favorite cartoonists. Two of his pieces of writing had a big impact on me early on: “Craft is the enemy” and “The Horrible Truth About Comics,” both of which are in his great book, The Cute Manifesto. (Fun fact: the original dummy book for Steal Like An Artist was just a copy of The Cute Manifesto with a dust jacket.)

If you haven’t read American Elf, it’s one of my favorite comics, ever. Start with volume one.

Filed under: james kochalka

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dept-of-research-and-development:


One of the many wonderful things about looking at his drawings is their inspirational message, especially to his fellow artists: Draw what you love and what interests you. Draw it how you want to draw it. When we are children we do this instinctively. But somewhere in our passage from childhood to adulthood, the ability to be truly and fearlessly creative is often lost. […] I’m not saying that looking at Steig’s drawings will solve all of anyone’s art problems. Just that giving yourself over to his work is a step in the right direction.

- Roz Chast, from her introduction to Cats, Dogs, Men, Women, Ninnies & Clowns: The Lost Art of William Steig

Steig is so great.

dept-of-research-and-development:

One of the many wonderful things about looking at his drawings is their inspirational message, especially to his fellow artists: Draw what you love and what interests you. Draw it how you want to draw it. When we are children we do this instinctively. But somewhere in our passage from childhood to adulthood, the ability to be truly and fearlessly creative is often lost. […] I’m not saying that looking at Steig’s drawings will solve all of anyone’s art problems. Just that giving yourself over to his work is a step in the right direction.

- Roz Chast, from her introduction to Cats, Dogs, Men, Women, Ninnies & Clowns: The Lost Art of William Steig

Steig is so great.

Aug 29, 2014
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Neil Gaiman, The Sandman

A young lady at Dragon’s Lair comics here in Austin talked me into buying the first volume, and when I got the whole stack from the library, another young lady at the checkout desk looked at the stack with approval and asked, “First time?”

It took me about two months to get through all ten volumes — read them only before bed, which did, unsurprisingly, have an effect on my dreams.

Sandman was a DC comics character that Gaiman resurrected for the series:

They said: make it your own. So I started thinking more mythic – let’s have someone who’s been around since the beginning of time, because that lets me play around with the whole of time and space. I inherited from mythology the idea that he was Morpheus, king of dreams: it’s a story about stories, and why we need them, all of them revolving in some way around Morpheus: we encounter a frustrated writer with an imprisoned muse; we attend a serial killer convention and the first performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream; we even find out what cats dream about (and why we should be afraid).

I have to admit, one thing I find very disorienting about reading the series, especially reading it all in one big gulp, is the rotating cast of artists. I find that when reading comics made by a bunch of different artists (different penciler, inker, colorist, etc.) there’s a kind of lack of visual unity that just puts things off a little. Characters sometimes don’t look like themselves, and it can be hard to track visually what’s going on. (Which makes me appreciate collaborations like Saga and From Hell all the more.)

Dave McKean, who did all the covers, alludes to this:

Since the interior artists changed all the time, I was the only consistent visual element. I wanted the covers to be a filter, a window of slightly surreal, melancholy, thoughtful imagery to pass through… Some covers were painted, some drawn, but many of the first few were 5ft-high collage-type works made by me that we took to a high-res photography studio to shoot – this was all pre-computers.

McKean’s covers are really worth browsing through (here are some of his favorites and a dedicated volume).

I actually wish there was a way (other than owning the original comics) to replicate the serialized experience of reading the individual issues. I’d like a series that was just the original comics, with ads and everything, bound together. These trade paperbacks I read had the covers, but everything was sort of squashed together, and it was hard to tell where one issue began and one ended. I suppose you could download the original scans on bittorrent or something.

It’s fun to swallow it all in one gulp, but I can only imagine how cool it was to read these individually, in their original context, back in the day. Saga is the first comic I’ve read for which I’ve actually gone to the comic book store to get new issues, and it’s a really fun experience.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

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Original pre-Photoshop assemblages Dave McKean made for The Sandman covers

neil-gaiman:

poisonousliasons:

Before Photoshop

I miss them still…

They really were that size: paintings and assemblages that Dave would take to get photographed, and send the transparency to DC Comics to use as a cover.

Here’s McKean:

Some covers were painted, some drawn, but many of the first few were 5ft-high collage-type works made by me that we took to a high-res photography studio to shoot – this was all pre-computers. I ended up wandering around London with Neil trying to find interesting bits and bobs to use as imagery. We liberated a fantastic-looking broken door from a skip, and found odds and ends in antique shops. People started donating things: I did a signing in London and someone gave me a lamb’s heart in a block of resin. It got used a few times.

Aug 08, 2014
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Anybody who’s been to a book signing can relate to this.

(Liana Finck for the New Yorker)

Anybody who’s been to a book signing can relate to this.

(Liana Finck for the New Yorker)

Aug 02, 2014
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ryanhamiltonwalsh:


Starting a new tradition with Ikea assemblies where I add the discussion had during the build into the instructions http://i.imgur.com/9LiM59y.jpg 


Filed under: captions

ryanhamiltonwalsh:

Starting a new tradition with Ikea assemblies where I add the discussion had during the build into the instructions

Filed under: captions

(via mlarson)

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