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Posts tagged "comics as poetry"

Jan 17, 2014
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Warren Craghead and some other fine cartoonists have some neat-looking work up in a NYC show called “The Fire To Say: Comics As Poetry.”

Warren Craghead and some other fine cartoonists have some neat-looking work up in a NYC show called “The Fire To Say: Comics As Poetry.

Jan 04, 2013
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Why I like comics

Box Brown asked me to write something about why I liked comics, but it was right after my kid was born, and I wasn’t thinking in complete thoughts, so I just drew a little diagram. (Most of my writing starts with drawing diagrams like this one…)

kochalka:


This also doubles as an awesome American Elf tribute!
retrofitcomics:

Thank you to Austin Kleon creator of the books Steal Like an Artist and Newspaper Blackout.  
COMICS DOPE is a regular feature celebrating the comics artform.

Why I like comics

Box Brown asked me to write something about why I liked comics, but it was right after my kid was born, and I wasn’t thinking in complete thoughts, so I just drew a little diagram. (Most of my writing starts with drawing diagrams like this one…)

kochalka:

This also doubles as an awesome American Elf tribute!

retrofitcomics:

Thank you to Austin Kleon creator of the books Steal Like an Artist and Newspaper Blackout.  

COMICS DOPE is a regular feature celebrating the comics artform.

Jul 25, 2011
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Wallace Stevens’ “Disillusionment of Ten O’Clock,” from The Collected Poems (animated by Lilli Carre)

The houses are haunted
By white night-gowns.
None are green,
Or purple with green rings,
Or green with yellow rings,
Or yellow with blue rings.
None of them are strange,
With socks of lace
And beaded ceintures.
People are not going
To dream of baboons and periwinkles.
Only, here and there, an old sailor,
Drunk and asleep in his boots,
Catches Tigers
In red weather.

More Wallace Stevens poems, illustrated →

Oct 18, 2010
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Cartooning isn’t writing and art – it’s poetry and graphic design.
James Sturm, cf. the cartoonist Seth: “The ‘words & pictures’ that make up the comics language are often described as prose and illustration combined. A bad metaphor: poetry and graphic design seems more apt. Poetry for the rhythm and condensing; graphic design because cartooning is more about moving shapes around — designing — then it is about drawing.”

Aug 19, 2010
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People think it’s writing and drawing, but I’ve always thought of cartooning as graphic design and poetry.
James Sturm, in discussion with Scott McCloud (via johnmartz) cf. “Poetry for the rhythm and condensing; graphic design because cartooning is more about moving shapes around — designing — then it is about drawing.” -Seth

Jun 16, 2010
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Musa McKim and Philip Guston, I thought I would never write anything down again, ink on paper, 19x24 inches

Some background on Guston’s collaborations with poets:

The Poem-Pictures constituted a series of drawings first initiated by Guston in 1970 in collaboration with poets including Bill Berkson, Clark Coolidge, Robert Creeley and William Corbett. Guston was interested in the interplay of words and images. In a letter to Bill Berkson in 1975, he wrote, “It is a strange form for me –excites me in that it does make a new thing– a new image–words and images feeding off each other in unpredictable ways. Naturally, there is no ‘illustration’ of text, yet I am fascinated by how text and image bounce into and off each other.”

Interesting note: McKim and Guston were wife and husband.

Musa McKim and Philip Guston, I thought I would never write anything down again, ink on paper, 19x24 inches

Some background on Guston’s collaborations with poets:

The Poem-Pictures constituted a series of drawings first initiated by Guston in 1970 in collaboration with poets including Bill Berkson, Clark Coolidge, Robert Creeley and William Corbett. Guston was interested in the interplay of words and images. In a letter to Bill Berkson in 1975, he wrote, “It is a strange form for me –excites me in that it does make a new thing– a new image–words and images feeding off each other in unpredictable ways. Naturally, there is no ‘illustration’ of text, yet I am fascinated by how text and image bounce into and off each other.”

Interesting note: McKim and Guston were wife and husband.

Apr 29, 2010
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Jul 13, 2009
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Jun 22, 2009
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Nov 06, 2008
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K. Parille takes a look at Charles Schulz’s punctuation in Peanuts: 

His work is only one example of the ways that text in comics — and especially in word balloons — is liberated from the kinds of ‘rules’ that govern prose. It’s a way that comics can be aligned with poetry, which shows far more openness and freedom with punctuation. Schulz, for example, almost never ends sentences with a period, a standard stop in essays, short stories, and novels (of course, he makes extensive use of ? and !). I tend to think of balloons as more like a blank page of poetry than a blank page of prose — a place that’s fairly wide open.

K. Parille takes a look at Charles Schulz’s punctuation in Peanuts:

His work is only one example of the ways that text in comics — and especially in word balloons — is liberated from the kinds of ‘rules’ that govern prose. It’s a way that comics can be aligned with poetry, which shows far more openness and freedom with punctuation. Schulz, for example, almost never ends sentences with a period, a standard stop in essays, short stories, and novels (of course, he makes extensive use of ? and !). I tend to think of balloons as more like a blank page of poetry than a blank page of prose — a place that’s fairly wide open.
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