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Posts tagged "copying"

Sep 05, 2014
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You start when you’re young and you copy. You straight up copy.

Dec 23, 2013
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“The poem will resemble you.”

How to Make a Dadaist Poem

Take a newspaper.
Take a pair of scissors.
Choose an article as long as you are planning to make your poem.
Cut out the article.
Then cut out each of the words that make up this article and put them in a bag.
Shake it gently.
Then take out the scraps one after the other in the order in which they left the bag.
Copy conscientiously.
The poem will be like you.
And here are you a writer, infinitely original and endowed with a sensibility that is charming though beyond the understanding of the vulgar.
—Tristan Tzara

The poem will resemble you.

Aug 07, 2013
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Wally Wood’s 22 Panels That Always Work

“If you think a man draws the type of hands that you want to draw, steal ‘em. Take those hands.”
—Jack Kirby

cf. Ivan Brunetti’s parody

Jun 28, 2013
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British album cover artist Roger Dean sues James Cameron over ‘Avatar’

A pretty ridiculous lawsuit:

Dean alleged that some Avatar production workers had studied and referenced Dean’s art as they worked on the movie. The lawsuit claimed the film copied “floating mountains,” “stone arches” and the antennae and markings on flying creatures.

With an equally ridiculous statement by Cameron’s lawyer:

Cameron lawyer Bert Fields called Cameron the “most original and creative person in the motion picture business today” and said he doesn’t need to copy from anyone.

Oh really? Here’s a big list of potential influences on Avatar. i09 has a gallery of Dean art that looks similar, along with an article about how many of the design elements were taken from cars, the ocean floor, and real-life mechanics.

(thx @nczeitgeist)

Jun 15, 2013
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Ivan Brunetti, Aesthetics: A Memoir

Brunetti’s an interesting guy. I love the spirit of the introduction—his humility and his contentment with just being one small member in a tribe of craftsmen…


  I am aware that there is no originality in my work, that pretty much all I am doing essentially is making my own version of Peanuts (crossed with Robert Crumb) and a vastly, hopelessly inferior one at that….No matter. I am happy to be a subatomic particle whizzing around inside the seemingly infinite ocean of cartooning.


…and the the book trailer…


  As a teacher, I like to encourage my students to explore their own past and explore the things that shaped them. And from there, I think you can use that as raw material for whatever [else] you want to explore. I don’t think anyone should be ashamed of where they came from or the things that aesthetically shaped them….
  
  I’m sure people will look at my drawing style and think, “That’s pretty simple. I can do that.” And actually, I think that’s good. That’s what I want people to say. Hopefully it will inspire someone to feel like they can do it and that they can take whatever limited ability or limited means…even just using the cheapest materials. […] The hardest thing for most people is simply getting started. That’s my hope [for this book] really: that people will look through it and just feel inspired to make something of their own and start valuing whatever it is they make.


If you haven’t read his book, Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice, it’s $10, and probably the best guide to cartooning ever written.

Ivan Brunetti, Aesthetics: A Memoir

Brunetti’s an interesting guy. I love the spirit of the introduction—his humility and his contentment with just being one small member in a tribe of craftsmen…

I am aware that there is no originality in my work, that pretty much all I am doing essentially is making my own version of Peanuts (crossed with Robert Crumb) and a vastly, hopelessly inferior one at that….No matter. I am happy to be a subatomic particle whizzing around inside the seemingly infinite ocean of cartooning.

…and the the book trailer

As a teacher, I like to encourage my students to explore their own past and explore the things that shaped them. And from there, I think you can use that as raw material for whatever [else] you want to explore. I don’t think anyone should be ashamed of where they came from or the things that aesthetically shaped them….

I’m sure people will look at my drawing style and think, “That’s pretty simple. I can do that.” And actually, I think that’s good. That’s what I want people to say. Hopefully it will inspire someone to feel like they can do it and that they can take whatever limited ability or limited means…even just using the cheapest materials. […] The hardest thing for most people is simply getting started. That’s my hope [for this book] really: that people will look through it and just feel inspired to make something of their own and start valuing whatever it is they make.

If you haven’t read his book, Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice, it’s $10, and probably the best guide to cartooning ever written.

(Source: yalepress.yale.edu)

Mar 04, 2013
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If my idea isn’t worth copying then it’s not a very good idea. If my product or business can’t handle a new competitor, then it’s not a very good product.

Jan 12, 2013
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Wally Wood’s 22 Panels That Always Work


  I don’t believe that Woody put the examples together as a teaching aid for his assistants, but rather as a reminder to himself. He was always trying to kick himself to put less labor into the work! He had a framed motto on the wall, “Never draw anything you can copy, never copy anything you can trace, never trace anything you can cut out and paste up.” He hung the sheets with the panels on the wall of his studio to constantly remind himself to stop what he called “noodling.”


See also: Ivan Brunetti’s parody

(Thx to Andy Wales)

Wally Wood’s 22 Panels That Always Work

I don’t believe that Woody put the examples together as a teaching aid for his assistants, but rather as a reminder to himself. He was always trying to kick himself to put less labor into the work! He had a framed motto on the wall, “Never draw anything you can copy, never copy anything you can trace, never trace anything you can cut out and paste up.” He hung the sheets with the panels on the wall of his studio to constantly remind himself to stop what he called “noodling.”

See also: Ivan Brunetti’s parody

(Thx to Andy Wales)

Jan 04, 2013
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I’ve never tried to copy anyone’s lines, which [was] really stupid. I thought that if you learnt other people’s basslines then you wouldn’t get your own style but in fact all that happens is that you don’t learn the instrument.
— Bass player Guy Pratt (via)

Dec 18, 2012
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Redrawing Comics

This is fun: Kevin Huizenga is re-drawing an old Dell Comics issue in the style of his Glenn Ganges comics. You can follow along here. His new book is Gloriana.

There’s also a Tumblr called Redrawn that features comic pages redrawn by various artist that cites Kevin and Tom Hart as the inspiration, and Covered, which featured artists reinterpreting comic covers.

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