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Posts tagged "copyright"

Sep 03, 2013
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For a Classic Motown Song About Money, Credit Is What He Wants

Sad copyright story: Barrett Strong, who first wrote and recorded “Money (That’s What I Want)” for Motown, has never seen a penny of royalties for the song, because Motown executives had him removed from the copyright registration. (The single was Motown’s first big hit, and sold over a million copies, but you could probably live off the publishing from the Beatles’ cover alone…)


  In 2009, Mr. Strong had a stroke, limiting his ability to play the piano and sing. He now lives in a retirement home here, and hopes that by recouping rights to “Money” he will more easily be able to pay his medical bills and residence fees. But he also wants his accomplishments properly remembered.
  
  “Songs outlive people,” he said, with a mixture of sadness, resignation and anger. “The real reason Motown worked was the publishing. The records were just a vehicle to get the songs out there to the public. The real money is in the publishing, and if you have publishing, then hang on to it. That’s what it’s all about. If you give it away, you’re giving away your life, your legacy. Once you’re gone, those songs will still be playing.”


Filed under: copyright

For a Classic Motown Song About Money, Credit Is What He Wants

Sad copyright story: Barrett Strong, who first wrote and recorded “Money (That’s What I Want)” for Motown, has never seen a penny of royalties for the song, because Motown executives had him removed from the copyright registration. (The single was Motown’s first big hit, and sold over a million copies, but you could probably live off the publishing from the Beatles’ cover alone…)

In 2009, Mr. Strong had a stroke, limiting his ability to play the piano and sing. He now lives in a retirement home here, and hopes that by recouping rights to “Money” he will more easily be able to pay his medical bills and residence fees. But he also wants his accomplishments properly remembered.

“Songs outlive people,” he said, with a mixture of sadness, resignation and anger. “The real reason Motown worked was the publishing. The records were just a vehicle to get the songs out there to the public. The real money is in the publishing, and if you have publishing, then hang on to it. That’s what it’s all about. If you give it away, you’re giving away your life, your legacy. Once you’re gone, those songs will still be playing.”

Filed under: copyright

Jun 28, 2013
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British album cover artist Roger Dean sues James Cameron over ‘Avatar’

A pretty ridiculous lawsuit:

Dean alleged that some Avatar production workers had studied and referenced Dean’s art as they worked on the movie. The lawsuit claimed the film copied “floating mountains,” “stone arches” and the antennae and markings on flying creatures.

With an equally ridiculous statement by Cameron’s lawyer:

Cameron lawyer Bert Fields called Cameron the “most original and creative person in the motion picture business today” and said he doesn’t need to copy from anyone.

Oh really? Here’s a big list of potential influences on Avatar. i09 has a gallery of Dean art that looks similar, along with an article about how many of the design elements were taken from cars, the ocean floor, and real-life mechanics.

(thx @nczeitgeist)

Apr 26, 2013
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Andy Baio, “The New Prohibition”

“Fair use will not save you.”

Finally got around to watching Andy’s chilling talk on copyright, remix culture, and his legal battle and $30,000 settlement with the lawyers of photographer Jay Maisel. Ugh.

I wrote a little something about fair use for the New York Times last year. Murky waters:

Of course, one man’s fair use is another’s infringement, and unfortunately, the burden of proof in a fair use case is on the defendant, who, often lacking the money to fight in court, has no choice but to cease and desist. Many artists have suffered this fate, and so I continue making the blackouts with fingers crossed for a litigation-free future.

Feb 26, 2013
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Infringement Claim Fails Because Law Protects Expression, Not Ideas


  The primary objective of copyright is not to reward the labor of authors, but ‘[t]o promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts’ [according to the US Constitution]. To this end, copyright assures authors the right to their original expression, but encourages others to build freely upon the ideas and information conveyed by a work.”

Infringement Claim Fails Because Law Protects Expression, Not Ideas

The primary objective of copyright is not to reward the labor of authors, but ‘[t]o promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts’ [according to the US Constitution]. To this end, copyright assures authors the right to their original expression, but encourages others to build freely upon the ideas and information conveyed by a work.”

Oct 10, 2012
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Sep 28, 2012
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Nobody can steal what they can’t see.

Jun 19, 2012
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May 25, 2012
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Fake goods aren’t totally bad…at least it created jobs at some counterfeit factories. We don’t want to be a brand that nobody wants to copy.
— Prada CEO Patrizio Bertelli’s response to counterfeit bags (via)

May 21, 2012
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“Fair Use,” inside back cover of Craphound #5 by Sean Tejaratchi

Sean sent this to me after we came in contact over the Banksy/plagiarism stuff:


  It’s the inside back cover I did for Crap Hound No.5. It’s a summary of the idea of Fair Use, and it addresses common questions and misconceptions. Feel free to pass it along to anyone if you think it’ll help. It was made about ten years ago, so it should probably be passed along with that warning, in case any new details have changed in the law.


More on fair use→

“Fair Use,” inside back cover of Craphound #5 by Sean Tejaratchi

Sean sent this to me after we came in contact over the Banksy/plagiarism stuff:

It’s the inside back cover I did for Crap Hound No.5. It’s a summary of the idea of Fair Use, and it addresses common questions and misconceptions. Feel free to pass it along to anyone if you think it’ll help. It was made about ten years ago, so it should probably be passed along with that warning, in case any new details have changed in the law.

More on fair use→

Jan 04, 2012
Permalink
No Stairway! Denied!

Wikipedia:


  While in the music store, Wayne (Myers) tries out a guitar by starting to play “Stairway to Heaven” by Led Zeppelin, and is stopped by a salesman (often falsely credited as Dana Strum from the band Slaughter), who points to a sign on the wall of the sales floor, which says “No Stairway To Heaven”. The joke references the fact that in a number of guitar stores in the UK, the song is banned from being played due to the fact that so many people tried to play the guitar portions of the song after its release, employees became sick of hearing it.


Something that has always bothered me in the guitar store scene: Wayne doesn’t actually play the first four notes from “Stairway To Heaven.” Turns out, for a reason:


  Wayne’s performance existed in original 35mm theatrical prints, but, due to the band’s licensing restrictions, the notes performed were changed for home video and television broadcasts and bear very little resemblance to the original, and the point of the joke is lost.


See, the first time I saw Wayne’s World, I was in the 4th grade, laid up with chicken pox, watching it on VHS.

I just scoured the internet to see if somebody’s YouTubed the original print, to no success. (Although, somebody did try dubbing them in.)

Four notes! Insanity.

No Stairway! Denied!

Wikipedia:

While in the music store, Wayne (Myers) tries out a guitar by starting to play “Stairway to Heaven” by Led Zeppelin, and is stopped by a salesman (often falsely credited as Dana Strum from the band Slaughter), who points to a sign on the wall of the sales floor, which says “No Stairway To Heaven”. The joke references the fact that in a number of guitar stores in the UK, the song is banned from being played due to the fact that so many people tried to play the guitar portions of the song after its release, employees became sick of hearing it.

Something that has always bothered me in the guitar store scene: Wayne doesn’t actually play the first four notes from “Stairway To Heaven.” Turns out, for a reason:

Wayne’s performance existed in original 35mm theatrical prints, but, due to the band’s licensing restrictions, the notes performed were changed for home video and television broadcasts and bear very little resemblance to the original, and the point of the joke is lost.

See, the first time I saw Wayne’s World, I was in the 4th grade, laid up with chicken pox, watching it on VHS.

I just scoured the internet to see if somebody’s YouTubed the original print, to no success. (Although, somebody did try dubbing them in.)

Four notes! Insanity.

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