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Posts tagged "david shrigley"

May 08, 2013
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Filed under: David Shrigley

Filed under: David Shrigley

(Source: venimosensondepaz, via braiker)

Apr 22, 2012
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Mar 03, 2012
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Saturday morning comics in bed


  I remember Saturday night baths and Sunday morning comics.
  —Joe Brainard


I honestly don’t read a lot of comics these days, but here are some good ones I was reading this a.m.:

Matt Forsythe's Jinchalo & Ojingogo - I’m a huge fan of Matt. He’s just off-the-charts these days. (My wife and I own one of his “warm up” paintings which is just beautiful.)
Tom Gauld's Goliath - Ditto for Tom — love my print we have in the stairwell. 
McSweeney’s More Things Like This - Not technically comics, and I haven’t made it all the way through this, but the David Shrigley dust jacket alone is pretty boss.
Filed under: my reading year 2012

Saturday morning comics in bed

I remember Saturday night baths and Sunday morning comics.
Joe Brainard

I honestly don’t read a lot of comics these days, but here are some good ones I was reading this a.m.:

Filed under: my reading year 2012

Mar 01, 2012
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What does David Shrigley do all day?


  I have a big fancy drawing board and I sit in front of that and draw. I start off working for the sake of working, almost randomly. I just draw and write things down just for the sake of it, and it’s not until several hours later that these things start to make sense. I make a large number of drawings and discard around 75 per cent. If I’m working hard I might do 30 or 40 drawings in a day. They’re all completely different. I only do anything once. That’s the rules. I always work on a standard paper size. The drawings I’ve done for the Hayward Gallery show are quite big, acrylic on paper. I could only do 15 of those in a day. I could make about 50 of the smaller ones if I’m working really hard and really late.
  
  I usually write a list of things to draw – a big, long list. If I want to make 50 works there are 50 things to draw. I write a list sometimes weeks before. I just look through books, the internet and just write something down. The starting point is usually ‘man being mauled by a lion’ or something. Sometimes I won’t draw it literally or it’s a text thing but that’s it started. I can fill 50 sheets of paper and once they’re done I’ll go back and add some images to text or text to image. It’s quite a regimented way to work. Sometimes the lion becomes a dog or a horse. ‘Man being mauled by a horse!’ The simple thing I’ve learned over the years is just to have a starting point and once you have a starting point the work seems to make itself.


Emphasis mine. Filed under: routine, David Shrigley

What does David Shrigley do all day?

I have a big fancy drawing board and I sit in front of that and draw. I start off working for the sake of working, almost randomly. I just draw and write things down just for the sake of it, and it’s not until several hours later that these things start to make sense. I make a large number of drawings and discard around 75 per cent. If I’m working hard I might do 30 or 40 drawings in a day. They’re all completely different. I only do anything once. That’s the rules. I always work on a standard paper size. The drawings I’ve done for the Hayward Gallery show are quite big, acrylic on paper. I could only do 15 of those in a day. I could make about 50 of the smaller ones if I’m working really hard and really late.

I usually write a list of things to draw – a big, long list. If I want to make 50 works there are 50 things to draw. I write a list sometimes weeks before. I just look through books, the internet and just write something down. The starting point is usually ‘man being mauled by a lion’ or something. Sometimes I won’t draw it literally or it’s a text thing but that’s it started. I can fill 50 sheets of paper and once they’re done I’ll go back and add some images to text or text to image. It’s quite a regimented way to work. Sometimes the lion becomes a dog or a horse. ‘Man being mauled by a horse!’ The simple thing I’ve learned over the years is just to have a starting point and once you have a starting point the work seems to make itself.

Emphasis mine. Filed under: routine, David Shrigley

Feb 08, 2012
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believermag:

Jason Polan micro-interviews David Shrigley.
THE BELIEVER: Do you make drawings every day?
DAVID SHRIGLEY: I don’t draw every day. I tend to draw intensely during certain periods of time. I draw to amuse myself on occasion, when I am bored and drawing is the only fun to be had.

I definitely feel better when my heroes admit to not drawing every day, like John Porcellino: “I’ll go months without drawing…”

believermag:

Jason Polan micro-interviews David Shrigley.

THE BELIEVER: Do you make drawings every day?

DAVID SHRIGLEY: I don’t draw every day. I tend to draw intensely during certain periods of time. I draw to amuse myself on occasion, when I am bored and drawing is the only fun to be had.

I definitely feel better when my heroes admit to not drawing every day, like John Porcellino: “I’ll go months without drawing…”

(Source: believermag)

Feb 02, 2012
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David Shrigley: Brain Activity - Exhibition Trailer

Great video of David Shrigley talking about his work. He’s great.

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David Shrigley drawing snapped by @sldistin

David Shrigley drawing snapped by @sldistin

Feb 01, 2012
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Jan 29, 2012
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David Shrigley: The Art of the Doodle - Slide Show - NYTimes.com

In February, London’s Hayward Gallery will mount a major survey of his work. To stuff the show with new art, he says, he had to trick himself into thinking he wasn’t actually making art at all.

In a spiral notebook, he jotted down 180 ideas for 180 pieces. Most consist of a few purposely cryptic words, intended as jumping- off points. No. 116 is ‘‘sea monster smiling’’; others are equally open-ended: ‘‘sword fight,’’ ‘‘dog on its hind legs,’’ ‘‘William Shakespeare.’’ ‘‘I try not to think too hard about what I’m doing,’’ Shrigley says. ‘‘I’m just crossing things off a list and fi lling a page, and the work gets made as a byproduct of that task.’’

…The overall effect is like discovering the sketchbook of a boy who taught himself to draw while locked in a basement. ‘‘I’m not trying to draw badly,’’ says Shrigley, who graduated from the Glasgow School of Art. ‘‘I’m just trying to draw without any consideration of craft.’’

Filed under: David Shrigley

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