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A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "design"

Apr 16, 2014
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Map of Ellen Lupton’s Thinking With Type

I made this back in 2008, and it’s sort of amazing how many of the ideas there were things I ran with that made their way into my own work…

Map of Ellen Lupton’s Thinking With Type

I made this back in 2008, and it’s sort of amazing how many of the ideas there were things I ran with that made their way into my own work…

Apr 02, 2014
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Feb 22, 2014
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If I remember correctly, my editor and I were on the phone talking about format ideas and trim sizes for Steal Like An Artist, and the problem was that my slides for the original talk were landscape format but books are usually portrait format. So I think Bruce suggested meeting in the middle and making it square.

So I went hunting for square books, and it turned out that James Kochalka’s The Cute Manifesto, one of my favorite little square books, is in the exact trim size we were talking about using, 6x6. So I drew up a cover, printed it out, and wrapped it around my copy to make a dummy book:

dummy book

I took that up to Workman and left it with them, and the story goes that they mocked up a bunch of other covers and laid them all out, but the late Peter Workman pointed to my dummy book and said, “That one.” (I regret so much that we never got to meet.)

It’s very, very rare that an author gets to do the covers for his books, but much to the credit of the Workman design team, they’ve let me in on every part of the process. I think part of what made that cover work is that it’s too stupidly simple—I’m not sure any real book cover designer would dare suggest something so simple.

Anyways, when it came time for Show Your Work!, I really conceived of both books as a kind of “Robin Hood” box set — you steal, and then you share — so it made sense to make them the same trim size. (We’ll see about the box set…)

Oct 08, 2013
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Mike Monteiro: “You are responsible for the work that you put into the world.”

Webstock ‘13: Mike Monteiro - How Designers Destroyed the World

You are directly responsible for what you put into the world. Yet every day designers all over the world work on projects without giving any thought or consideration to the impact that work has on the world around them. This needs to change.

Set aside 50 minutes to watch this really important talk by my friend Mike Monteiro (@mike_FTW). It’s aimed at designers, but it applies to all of us.

Here’s an excerpt that Mike quotes from Victor Papanek’s Design For The Real World:

There are professions more harmful than industrial design, but only a very few of them. And possibly only one profession is phonier. Advertising design, in persuading people to buy things they don’t need, with money they don’t have, in order to impress others who don’t care, is probably the phoniest field in existence today. Industrial design, by concocting the tawdry idiocies hawked by advertisers, comes a close second. Never before in history have grown men sat down and seriously designed electric hairbrushes, rhinestone-covered file boxes, and mink carpeting for bathrooms, and then drawn up elaborate plans to make and sell these gadgets to millions of people. Before (in the ‘good old days’), if a person liked killing people, he had to become a general, purchase a coal-mine, or else study nuclear physics. Today, industrial design has put murder on a mass-production basis. By designing criminally unsafe automobiles that kill or maim nearly one million people around the world each year, by creating whole new species of permanent garbage to clutter up the landscape, and by choosing materials and processes that pollute the air we breathe, designers have become a dangerous breed. And the skills needed in these activities are taught carefully to young people.

In an age of mass production when everything must be planned and designed, design has become the most powerful tool with which man shapes his tools and environments (and, by extension, society and himself). This demands high social and moral responsibility from the designer. It also demands greater understanding of the people by those who practise design and more insight into the design process by the public.

Great, great talk. I also highly recommend Mike’s book, Design is a Job.

Filed under: Mike Monteiro

Mar 29, 2013
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mrgan:

“Work” icon

mrgan:

“Work” icon

Mar 15, 2013
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Don’t get it original, get it right.
— Edward Tufte

Mar 03, 2013
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Feb 03, 2013
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Cover for James Joyce’s Ulysses by Peter Mendelsund


  he was covered in the detritus of his work

Cover for James Joyce’s Ulysses by Peter Mendelsund

he was covered in the detritus of his work

Jan 09, 2013
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Art and design schools still nurture the image of the genius designer as an individual artist. Originality is rewarded as a higher standard than com-munication, and copying is considered a sin.

Jan 04, 2013
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Comics and Information Design

A map I doodled way back in 2007, back when I was thinking about going to design school. (I got in, but moved to Texas with my wife, instead…)

Comics and Information Design

A map I doodled way back in 2007, back when I was thinking about going to design school. (I got in, but moved to Texas with my wife, instead…)

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