TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about. Ask me anything you can't Google.



Posts tagged "drawing"

Oct 08, 2014
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40,000-year-old cave paintings found on an Indonesian island

Early artists made them by carefully blowing paint around hands that were pressed tightly against the cave walls and ceilings… There are also human figures, and pictures of wild hoofed animals that are found only on the island.

Oct 06, 2014
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Oct 05, 2014
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A little girl was in a drawing lesson. [The teacher] said, “What are you drawing?” And the girl said, “I’m drawing a picture of God.” And the teacher said, “But nobody knows what God looks like.” And the girl said, “They will in a minute.”
— Sir Ken Robinson, “How Schools Kill Creativity

Oct 03, 2014
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Henri Cartier-Bresson drawing himself in a mirror, 1992

Not a lot of people know this, but Henri Cartier-Bresson actually left photography at one point to pursue his first love: drawing. He wrote of their differences in The Mind’s Eye:


  Photography is, for me, a spontaneous impulse coming from an ever-attentive eye, which captures the moment and its eternity…Photography is an immediate reaction, drawing a meditation.


Later in life, in 1983, after an exhibit of his drawings was shown at the MoMA, his friend Saul Steinberg wrote him a nice note about his drawings:


  I often look at your drawings in the Museum of Modern Art catalogue. To my mind, photography was a form of gymnastics for you, a sort of decoy, an alibi for your real thing in life.


I was reminded of Cartier-Bresson when I read this Fast Company article about a man who, inspired by Craig Thompson’s brilliant Carnet de Voyage, stopped taking any photos for a year, and drew instead.

See also: Roger Ebert on sketching

Henri Cartier-Bresson drawing himself in a mirror, 1992

Not a lot of people know this, but Henri Cartier-Bresson actually left photography at one point to pursue his first love: drawing. He wrote of their differences in The Mind’s Eye:

Photography is, for me, a spontaneous impulse coming from an ever-attentive eye, which captures the moment and its eternity…Photography is an immediate reaction, drawing a meditation.

Later in life, in 1983, after an exhibit of his drawings was shown at the MoMA, his friend Saul Steinberg wrote him a nice note about his drawings:

I often look at your drawings in the Museum of Modern Art catalogue. To my mind, photography was a form of gymnastics for you, a sort of decoy, an alibi for your real thing in life.

I was reminded of Cartier-Bresson when I read this Fast Company article about a man who, inspired by Craig Thompson’s brilliant Carnet de Voyage, stopped taking any photos for a year, and drew instead.

See also: Roger Ebert on sketching

Sep 30, 2014
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thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.

In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?

Read more here….

Filed under: comics

Sep 28, 2014
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Bendy straw drawing by its inventor, Joseph B. Friedman

I love this drawing.

Bendy straw drawing by its inventor, Joseph B. Friedman

I love this drawing.

Sep 27, 2014
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jonklassen:

moon deer

Love Jon’s stuff. I’ve read I Want My Hat Back to O so many times…

jonklassen:

moon deer

Love Jon’s stuff. I’ve read I Want My Hat Back to O so many times…

(via ayjay)

Sep 19, 2014
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Thumbnail drawings from Henry David Thoreau’s journals

Thoreau left all sorts of little thumbnail drawings in his journals, and as Linda Holt Brown points out in her paper, “The Zen Drawings of H.D. Thoreau” (these images come from her great accompanying PowerPoint), many of them have a wonderful Zen quality to them.

John Cage liked them so much he blew them up and projected them behind some of his performances. (See also: his print composite of the drawings.)

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“17 Drawings by Thoreau”

A print by John Cage:


  [Cage] found source material in the small ink drawings of natural phenomena in the poet-philosopher Henry David Thoreau’s journals. The selection (hawk feather, hazelnut, rabbit tracks, and so on), position, orientation, scale, and color of the drawings were calculated by what Cage called chance operations.

“17 Drawings by Thoreau”

A print by John Cage:

[Cage] found source material in the small ink drawings of natural phenomena in the poet-philosopher Henry David Thoreau’s journals. The selection (hawk feather, hazelnut, rabbit tracks, and so on), position, orientation, scale, and color of the drawings were calculated by what Cage called chance operations.

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