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Posts tagged "drawing"

Aug 01, 2014
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Peanuts, August 8, 1981

@jndevereux:


  I love the way Schulz drew clouds and the sun in this Peanuts


Me too. One thing to note: Schulz actually had a hand tremor. He once complained (supposedly in the 1980s, the same decade this strip was drawn, although I can’t find the exact source) that “sometimes my hand shakes so much I have to hold my wrist to draw.”  I’m not sure when it really started to show in his work. If you pick up a collection like A Golden Celebration, you can definitely see that his line gets more wobbly and loose over the years, but things are still reasonably tight in the 80s. (It’s hard to tell, honestly, since the drawings were always so reduced for the paper. You can see how big he worked here.) Might have to add Schulz to my list of artists whose physical shortcomings led to signature work.

Regardless, these panels rule.

Filed under: Peanuts

Peanuts, August 8, 1981

@jndevereux:

I love the way Schulz drew clouds and the sun in this Peanuts

Me too. One thing to note: Schulz actually had a hand tremor. He once complained (supposedly in the 1980s, the same decade this strip was drawn, although I can’t find the exact source) that “sometimes my hand shakes so much I have to hold my wrist to draw.”  I’m not sure when it really started to show in his work. If you pick up a collection like A Golden Celebration, you can definitely see that his line gets more wobbly and loose over the years, but things are still reasonably tight in the 80s. (It’s hard to tell, honestly, since the drawings were always so reduced for the paper. You can see how big he worked here.) Might have to add Schulz to my list of artists whose physical shortcomings led to signature work.

Regardless, these panels rule.

Filed under: Peanuts

Jul 19, 2014
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Hans Hofmann Drawings

Boston Globe:

Executed with a matchstick dipped in ink, and sometimes made on the fly in his roadster, the drawings come across as breezy finger exercises. The more you look at them, though, the more you see…

More on Hofmann here.

Filed under: drawing

Jul 06, 2014
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Christoph Niemann’s Sunday Sketches on Instagram.

These are so wonderful. Be sure to check out his book, Abstract City.

FIled under: Christoph Niemann

Apr 25, 2014
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I like to see wet ink. A computer leaves me unable to do what I live for: to find something unexpected.

Mar 25, 2014
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Wendy MacNaughton, Meanwhile in San Francisco: The City In Its Own Words

I’m not jealous of many of my artist friends, but I’m jealous of Wendy.

We both had books come out recently, and they’re both doing pretty well, but her book is an actual WORK OF ART, while mine is ABOUT the work of art.

Why is Wendy so good? She draws her ass off.

She WORKS.

She’s out on the street with a pen and her watercolors, finding stories out in the world. Real stories. She’s doing the work I thought I’d be doing years ago, but somehow got away from.

I’m proud to be her friend, I’m proud of her book, and I’m ready to follow her example and start drawing again.

Time to make art and not just talk about it.

Get this book.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Feb 24, 2014
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Picasso’s Constellations

What are we looking at? According to biographer John Richardson, in the summer of 1924, “The splendor of the meridonal sky … inspired Picasso to create his own constellations: ink dots connected by fine pen lines that turn the zodiac into guitars and mandolins and the crotchen-dotted staves of musical scores.”

Feb 14, 2014
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Darwin’s Children Drew All Over his manuscript

The top image was drawn on the back of the On The Origin Of The Species manuscript, the second image is of the Darwin family home:

with cozy details like a tea kettle on the boil and a fluffy orange cat in the attic window… Fascinatingly, this image might be detailed enough that it actually depicts Darwin’s famous sandwalk, his “thinking path” that led to the family greenhouse (which is, perhaps, the structure visible at the end of the path). The area was later made into a playground for the Darwin children.

The third image is of Emma Darwin’s diary, which a toddler has blacked out.

It’s all a great reminder that even legendary scientists had family lives, and that when we think about history, it’s important to remember that famous figures weren’t working in isolation. They were surrounded by far less famous friends, family members, acquaintances, and enemies. And sometimes, when we get lucky, we see some of their artifacts from the past too.

Filed under: parenting

(via)

Jan 27, 2014
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All drawing is process. You make some marks on paper. Those marks help guide you to make other marks. You frequently don’t know where you are going until you get there.
— Bert Dodson, Keys to Drawing (via)

(Source: thinkprocessnotproduct)

Jan 09, 2014
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Michelangelo’s Handwritten 16th-Century Grocery List


  Because the servant he was sending to market was illiterate… Michelangelo illustrated the shopping lists — a herring, tortelli, two fennel soups, four anchovies and ‘a small quarter of a rough wine’ — with rushed (and all the more exquisite for it) caricatures in pen and ink.

Michelangelo’s Handwritten 16th-Century Grocery List

Because the servant he was sending to market was illiterate… Michelangelo illustrated the shopping lists — a herring, tortelli, two fennel soups, four anchovies and ‘a small quarter of a rough wine’ — with rushed (and all the more exquisite for it) caricatures in pen and ink.

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Jean-Michel Basquiat, King Brand (1983) (via)

Jean-Michel Basquiat, King Brand (1983) (via)

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