TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "education"

Jan 23, 2014
Permalink

Lynda Barry’s course syllabus

I probably get as excited about Lynda’s class starting as her students do. Follow along here.

Jan 12, 2014
Permalink
Today’s NYTimes quotes @joycecaroloates arguing that most great writers of the past would be rejected by today’s universities.

Today’s NYTimes quotes @joycecaroloates arguing that most great writers of the past would be rejected by today’s universities.

Nov 05, 2013
Permalink
The teacher is justified to lead students only if he is and remains a student.

Jun 14, 2013
Permalink
I write for the unlearned about things in which I am unlearned myself…I write as one amateur to another.

Apr 05, 2013
Permalink
Kio Stark, Don’t Go Back To School

I was really thrilled to read Kio’s book before it came out — if you follow my “you dont have to go to college” tag you know this is a subject near and dear to me. Here’s my blurb from the inside cover:


  Not going to graduate school felt like a failure at the time, but wound up being the best choice I ever made. It set me out on a path of self-learning and discovery that led me to work I love, work that would’ve never flown in an academic setting. How I wish I’d had Kio’s book as a guide to help me along the way!


Over and over in the interviews with independent learners, what struck me was the importance of publicly sharing and teaching what you’re learning:


  You need to create a feedback loop that confirms your work is worth it and keeps you moving forward. In school this is provided by advancing through the steps of the linear path within an individual class or a set curriculum, as well as from feedback in the form of grades and praise. Outside of school, people I talked to got their sense of competence from many sources. Many reported to me that they often turn around and teach what they’ve learned to others as soon as they’ve learned it. This gives them a sense of mastery and deepens their understanding. When their learning is structured around a specific project, successful completion and functioning of the project proves their progress. Projects can include making a computer program, constructing a book, making a film, writing about an unfamiliar topic, starting a business, or learning a skill. Projects give you a goal for learning skills and abstract information alike, and contribute to gaining a sense of mastery and competence as you complete them.  


For me, blogging was basically my graduate school.

You can get the eBook from Kio’s site.

Kio Stark, Don’t Go Back To School

I was really thrilled to read Kio’s book before it came out — if you follow my “you dont have to go to college” tag you know this is a subject near and dear to me. Here’s my blurb from the inside cover:

Not going to graduate school felt like a failure at the time, but wound up being the best choice I ever made. It set me out on a path of self-learning and discovery that led me to work I love, work that would’ve never flown in an academic setting. How I wish I’d had Kio’s book as a guide to help me along the way!

Over and over in the interviews with independent learners, what struck me was the importance of publicly sharing and teaching what you’re learning:

You need to create a feedback loop that confirms your work is worth it and keeps you moving forward. In school this is provided by advancing through the steps of the linear path within an individual class or a set curriculum, as well as from feedback in the form of grades and praise. Outside of school, people I talked to got their sense of competence from many sources. Many reported to me that they often turn around and teach what they’ve learned to others as soon as they’ve learned it. This gives them a sense of mastery and deepens their understanding. When their learning is structured around a specific project, successful completion and functioning of the project proves their progress. Projects can include making a computer program, constructing a book, making a film, writing about an unfamiliar topic, starting a business, or learning a skill. Projects give you a goal for learning skills and abstract information alike, and contribute to gaining a sense of mastery and competence as you complete them.  

For me, blogging was basically my graduate school.

You can get the eBook from Kio’s site.

Mar 28, 2013
Permalink
jndevereux:

momalibrary:

John Baldessari - Four Rules (1978) -ds

To-do list. 

Filed under: Baldessari

jndevereux:

momalibrary:

John Baldessari - Four Rules (1978) -ds

To-do list.

Filed under: Baldessari

Mar 20, 2013
Permalink
It often happens that two schoolboys can solve difficulties in their work for one another better than the master can. When you took the problem to a master, as we all remember, he was very likely to explain what you understood already, to add a great deal of information which you didn’t want, and say nothing at all about the thing that was puzzling you. I have watched this from both sides of the net; for when, as a teacher myself, I have tried to answer questions brought me by pupils, I have sometimes, after a minute, seen that expression settle down on their faces that assured me that they were suffering exactly the same frustration which I had suffered from my teachers. The fellow-pupil can help more than the master because he knows less. The difficulty we want him to explain is one he has recently met. The expert met it so long ago he has forgotten. He sees the whole subject, by now, in a different light that he cannot conceive what is really troubling the pupil; he sees a dozen other difficulties which ought to be troubling him but aren’t.
C. S. Lewis, “Introductory” to Reflections on the Psalms (The awesome ayjay, an expert on C.S. Lewis, tumbled this after I asked him if he knew the quote mentioned by this Amazon reviewer. Man, do I love the internet.)

Jan 30, 2013
Permalink

Join Cartoonist Lynda Barry for a University-Level Course on Doodling and Neuroscience

Can I just stop you for a minute and note how fucking amazing it is that one of our greatest living cartoonists is not only teaching this class, but she’s letting us all follow along? Incredible.

Jan 09, 2013
Permalink
Art and design schools still nurture the image of the genius designer as an individual artist. Originality is rewarded as a higher standard than com-munication, and copying is considered a sin.

Dec 27, 2012
Permalink

A library without books

Stacks of books are history at Benilde library

…the tall stacks of 5,000 books that towered in the main room last school year are gone. Teachers brought a few into classrooms, but most were donated to schools in Africa. Now the room is filled with tables and chairs where students gather with their school laptops.

You know, they had a name for this kind of room when I was in high school: it was called study hall, and we held it in the cafeteria.

There’s a lot to be sad about in this article, like the student who admits, “I never really used the actual library before. I’m a senior in high school and never used a book.”

But even more terrifying to me: “This generation of kids … learning is a social experience for them.”

My learning in the library was very social, if you count socializing with dead people.

I’m a supreme extrovert, and yet I despised group work and never felt like I learned anything from my classmates, other than, you know, that I wanted to move the fuck away from home and get away from all of them. (Maybe I’m just a dick — I do believe that all art requires a certain amount of misanthropy…)

God, when I think of the hours I’ve spent in libraries, just following the scent of paper trails and wandering around, bumping into books… is my kid not going to experience this?

And as for social learning: the best formal education I got was 6 months of the tutorial system at Cambridge University, in which I read all week at the massive library or in my Raskolnikovian closet of a room, wrote a paper, emailed it to my tutor, walked over to his house and talked about it for an hour, then went off to pick up the books he gave me to read the next week. The only group work I did was play keyboards in a band and go get pissed at the pub. It was glorious.

Subscribe to my newsletter and get new art, writing, and interesting links delivered to your inbox every week.