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A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "english"

Apr 05, 2013
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He wouldn’t know how to pour piss out of a boot if the instructions were printed on the heel.

Dec 23, 2012
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May 24, 2012
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I love words…they’re my work, they’re my play, they’re my passion. Words are all we have really. We have thoughts, but thoughts are fluid. Then we assign a word to a thought, and we’re stuck with that word for that thought. So be careful with words. I like to think the same words that hurt can heal. It’s a matter of how you pick them.
— George Carlin, in his 40-year-old routine, “7 Dirty Words,” off 1972’s Class Clown

Aug 17, 2011
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Poets who eventually commit suicide use I-words [I, me, my] more than non-suicidal poets.

Jan 12, 2011
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If you can’t explain what you’re doing in plain English, you’re probably doing something wrong.

Jan 08, 2011
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Aug 17, 2010
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"Stickler" English professor Lynne Rosenthal: Starbucks booted me over a bagel order - NYPOST.com

This is just perfect. The story, the photo…it’s amazing it’s not an Onion article. (via @DRMabuse)

"Stickler" English professor Lynne Rosenthal: Starbucks booted me over a bagel order - NYPOST.com

This is just perfect. The story, the photo…it’s amazing it’s not an Onion article. (via @DRMabuse)

Jun 28, 2010
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Be obscure clearly! Be wild of tongue in a way we can understand!
— E.B. White & William Strunk, Jr., The Elements of Style (viafrank)

Mar 30, 2010
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Jan 13, 2010
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Kerouac diagrammed (from Sister Bernadette’s Barking Dog)(Part of) the last sentence of On The Road, diagrammed:the evening star must be dropping and shedding her sparkler dims on the prairie, which is just before the coming of complete night that blesses the earth, darkens all rivers, cups the peaks and folds the final shore in, and nobody, nobody knows what’s going to happen to anybody besides the forlorn rags of growing old…

Kerouac diagrammed (from Sister Bernadette’s Barking Dog)

(Part of) the last sentence of On The Road, diagrammed:

the evening star must be dropping and shedding her sparkler dims on the prairie, which is just before the coming of complete night that blesses the earth, darkens all rivers, cups the peaks and folds the final shore in, and nobody, nobody knows what’s going to happen to anybody besides the forlorn rags of growing old…
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