TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "ernest hemingway"

Nov 25, 2013
Permalink
You get up and, first thing in the morning, you do your 500 words. Do it every day and you’ve got a book in eight or nine months.
Vaclav Smil, on how he’s published 30 books (3 of them in the last year)

Sep 02, 2013
Permalink
I had studied Hemingway so closely and learned a lot, but I didn’t agree with his attitude about life, about himself. He took everything so seriously. Your style comes out of your attitude — what kind of a person you are, your personality, how you see things. Are you optimistic? Are you funny? Are you grim? What? This is all out of your attitude. And once I learned that then I had to find other writers to study and imitate.
Elmore Leonard on getting out from under the influence of Hemingway

Dec 31, 2012
Permalink
We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master.
— Ernest Hemingway

Apr 21, 2012
Permalink
Elmore Leonard, Rum Punch1

Elmore Leonard is my favorite author for air travel. No bullshit, just great dialogue and a big bag of money everybody’s trying to get.

Rum Punch is the source material for my favorite Tarantino movie, Jackie Brown. The movie is a case study of great adaptation: trimming a little fat (tasty, but still fat) from the story, transforming the material into something of your own (Jackie, in the original, is not black, and certainly not Pam Grier), etc.

If you’re not familiar with Leonard’s work: GET TO IT. Here’s a great line on Hemingway from a recent Q&A: “I used to read a lot of him till I learned he had no sense of humor.”



You’ll notice from the photo that I’ve had the hardcover for ages, but only finally read the ebook—Leonard is the perfect for the Kindle. ↩

Elmore Leonard, Rum Punch1

Elmore Leonard is my favorite author for air travel. No bullshit, just great dialogue and a big bag of money everybody’s trying to get.

Rum Punch is the source material for my favorite Tarantino movie, Jackie Brown. The movie is a case study of great adaptation: trimming a little fat (tasty, but still fat) from the story, transforming the material into something of your own (Jackie, in the original, is not black, and certainly not Pam Grier), etc.

If you’re not familiar with Leonard’s work: GET TO IT. Here’s a great line on Hemingway from a recent Q&A: “I used to read a lot of him till I learned he had no sense of humor.”


  1. You’ll notice from the photo that I’ve had the hardcover for ages, but only finally read the ebook—Leonard is the perfect for the Kindle. 

Dec 16, 2011
Permalink

Writers having fun

Since it’s Friday and we’re all depressed about Hitchens, for some Friday fun post a photo reply with your favorite photo of a writer having fun.

Above: Hitchens + Hemingway

May 03, 2011
Permalink
How Writers Build the Brand - NYTimes.com

It’s always comforting to be reminded that literary whoring — I mean, self-marketing — has been practiced by the greats. 
The most revered of French novelists recognized the need for P.R. “For artists, the great problem to solve is how to get oneself noticed,” Balzac observed in “Lost Illusions,” his classic novel about literary life in early 19th-century Paris. As another master, Stendhal, remarked in his autobiography “Memoirs of an Egotist,” “Great success is not possible without a certain degree of shamelessness, and even of out-and-out charlatanism.”

Terrific read.

How Writers Build the Brand - NYTimes.com

It’s always comforting to be reminded that literary whoring — I mean, self-marketing — has been practiced by the greats.

The most revered of French novelists recognized the need for P.R. “For artists, the great problem to solve is how to get oneself noticed,” Balzac observed in “Lost Illusions,” his classic novel about literary life in early 19th-century Paris. As another master, Stendhal, remarked in his autobiography “Memoirs of an Egotist,” “Great success is not possible without a certain degree of shamelessness, and even of out-and-out charlatanism.”

Terrific read.

Mar 18, 2011
Permalink
Hemingway kicks a can

This photo was likely taken in Ketchum, Idaho, where Hemingway died and is buried. (via if charlie parker was a gunslinger)

Hemingway kicks a can

This photo was likely taken in Ketchum, Idaho, where Hemingway died and is buried. (via if charlie parker was a gunslinger)

Aug 05, 2009
Permalink
When you work all day with your head and know you must again work the next day, what else can change your ideas and make them run on a different plane like whiskey?
Subscribe to my newsletter and get new art, writing, and interesting links delivered to your inbox every week.