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A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "feedback"

Apr 05, 2014
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Feedback is great for telling you what you did wrong. It’s terrible at telling you what you should do next.

May 20, 2013
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The Zine Revolution

Joshua Glenn writes about one of the first zines he ever read, published by his friends at school in 1985:


  what impressed me most about The Mark of Cain is how it inspired a thuggish football player to punch John in the mouth… because the guy (correctly) assumed that the message “Diana, will you please shut the kindly fuck up” inscribed onto one of the zine’s pages was a reference to his girlfriend. John and I were co-editors of the school’s literary magazine, which inspired no such visceral reactions! Not that I wanted to be punched in the mouth, but in some inchoate way I realized then and there that literary publishing would never provide me with the kind of immediate, personal feedback loop I craved.


(Glenn co-edited the book Significant Objects with my friend, Rob Walker.

The Zine Revolution

Joshua Glenn writes about one of the first zines he ever read, published by his friends at school in 1985:

what impressed me most about The Mark of Cain is how it inspired a thuggish football player to punch John in the mouth… because the guy (correctly) assumed that the message “Diana, will you please shut the kindly fuck up” inscribed onto one of the zine’s pages was a reference to his girlfriend. John and I were co-editors of the school’s literary magazine, which inspired no such visceral reactions! Not that I wanted to be punched in the mouth, but in some inchoate way I realized then and there that literary publishing would never provide me with the kind of immediate, personal feedback loop I craved.

(Glenn co-edited the book Significant Objects with my friend, Rob Walker.

Apr 03, 2013
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The Dead, Feedback in 1968 (via @leeranaldo h/t newspeedwayboogie)

The Dead, Feedback in 1968 (via @leeranaldo h/t newspeedwayboogie)

Jan 31, 2013
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Nov 14, 2012
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Some thoughts and musings about making things for the web - The Oatmeal

I don’t agree with everything in this piece (for instance, I think a regular schedule with deadlines is good for a creator, even if they don’t feel like they have something to say — if Charles Schulz didn’t have them, we wouldn’t have 50 years of Peanuts to read…) but Inman and I share the same philosophy about comments: let people talk about your work as much as they like, but on other forums, not your own site. Not just for your own sake, but for the sake of your readers.

Oh, and though it does serve a purpose as an umbrella, the term “content creators” makes me queasy.

PS. Realized that cartoonist Natalie Dee basically described these two panels in a 2010 interview: “There’s never a space under paintings in a gallery where someone writes their opinion. When you get to the end of a book, you don’t have to see what everyone else thought of it.”

Some thoughts and musings about making things for the web - The Oatmeal

I don’t agree with everything in this piece (for instance, I think a regular schedule with deadlines is good for a creator, even if they don’t feel like they have something to say — if Charles Schulz didn’t have them, we wouldn’t have 50 years of Peanuts to read…) but Inman and I share the same philosophy about comments: let people talk about your work as much as they like, but on other forums, not your own site. Not just for your own sake, but for the sake of your readers.

Oh, and though it does serve a purpose as an umbrella, the term “content creators” makes me queasy.

PS. Realized that cartoonist Natalie Dee basically described these two panels in a 2010 interview: “There’s never a space under paintings in a gallery where someone writes their opinion. When you get to the end of a book, you don’t have to see what everyone else thought of it.”

Jul 02, 2008
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It’s funny, because when I write lyrics and am using them in the rehearsal, people are like, “Well, I like that line, and I like that line, and blah blah blah” and usually, it’s the lines I’m on the verge of throwing out. [Radiohead multi-instrumentalist] Jonny Greenwood is the best for that. I was writing this song the other day, and there’s a line about voices down echo chambers, and I was literally about to delete it when Jonny goes, “That’s the line I like!” It’s the same thing on “Bodysnatchers,” there’s the line, “Has the light gone out for you? Because the light’s gone for me.” I was a bit unsure about it. When people respond positively to it, that’s what stays in.
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