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Posts tagged "gary panter"

Jun 29, 2013
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believermag:

THE BELIEVER: Is it true you only sleep four hours a night?
GARY PANTER: Yes, but I take so many five-minute naps it might add up to a regular night’s sleep. I wake up every morning at 7:30 and read the paper and drink chocolate milk, then take my daughter to school. I run errands during the day, and tend to get to work at nighttime, going steadily till three in the morning on different things. I put my paintbrush down, and pick up my guitar ten feet away and try out my new flanger pedal for an hour, then I paint for an hour, and then I make something out of chopsticks and flexi-straws, and then I might write a short story. I don’t find that hard to do, it’s just the way I do it. I notice inspiration when it comes by. I don’t sit down at my desk and try to write; rather, I work at something else and then I’ll get an idea for a story and make a note. That’s how I jump from medium to medium. If you keep pushing paint when you’re tired of it, you lose sensitivity. I can only focus on painting for a few hours, so I’ll stop and work on something quite different. Making art, I try to just gently persist, instead of having freak-outs where I’m like, Oh, my god, I’ll never draw again. You are going to draw again, so you might as well relax.
From a Believer interview with Gary Panter (June 2009).
Also see: Gary Panter’s Drawing Tips

I’ve blogged this before but I love it so much I’m blogging it again.

believermag:

THE BELIEVER: Is it true you only sleep four hours a night?

GARY PANTER: Yes, but I take so many five-minute naps it might add up to a regular night’s sleep. I wake up every morning at 7:30 and read the paper and drink chocolate milk, then take my daughter to school. I run errands during the day, and tend to get to work at nighttime, going steadily till three in the morning on different things. I put my paintbrush down, and pick up my guitar ten feet away and try out my new flanger pedal for an hour, then I paint for an hour, and then I make something out of chopsticks and flexi-straws, and then I might write a short story. I don’t find that hard to do, it’s just the way I do it. I notice inspiration when it comes by. I don’t sit down at my desk and try to write; rather, I work at something else and then I’ll get an idea for a story and make a note. That’s how I jump from medium to medium. If you keep pushing paint when you’re tired of it, you lose sensitivity. I can only focus on painting for a few hours, so I’ll stop and work on something quite different. Making art, I try to just gently persist, instead of having freak-outs where I’m like, Oh, my god, I’ll never draw again. You are going to draw again, so you might as well relax.

From a Believer interview with Gary Panter (June 2009).

Also see: Gary Panter’s Drawing Tips

I’ve blogged this before but I love it so much I’m blogging it again.

Dec 11, 2012
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Hi Austin! My 18-yo cousin is feeling discouraged because she feels like her drawings look like cartoons, which made me remember a video (that I think you posted) that was a sort of timeline showing someone's progress in technique and skill over several years. I've been looking through all your likeliest tags and even googled it, but can't find the video. I'm hoping it was a post of yours... Do you know what I'm talking about or am I nuts?

Hmm… doesn’t sound familiar. You might ask her, “What’s wrong with cartoons?” David Shrigley can’t draw for shit and he’s one of my favorite artists!

Buy her Picture This or send her to this Gary Panter post and give her Wayne Coyne’s advice: “Don’t think. Just start drawing.” (And keep drawing.)

“It’s okay to head out for Wonderful, but on your way to Wonderful, you’re gonna have to pass through Alright…” —Bill Withers

Nov 05, 2012
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Gary Panter’s tips for starting a sketchbook


  For starting in a sketchbook, you need to jump in and get over the intimidation part — by messing up a few pages, ripping them out if need be. Waste all the pages you want by drawing a tic tac toe schematic or something, painting them black, just doodle. Every drawing will make you a little better. Every little attempt is a step in the direction of drawing becoming a part of your life.

Gary Panter’s tips for starting a sketchbook

For starting in a sketchbook, you need to jump in and get over the intimidation part — by messing up a few pages, ripping them out if need be. Waste all the pages you want by drawing a tic tac toe schematic or something, painting them black, just doodle. Every drawing will make you a little better. Every little attempt is a step in the direction of drawing becoming a part of your life.

Oct 06, 2012
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Don’t worry about style.

  1. “Don’t worry about style. It will be expressed no matter what you do. Style is part of the way your brain is wired.” —Luke Sullivan

  2. “The problem with art today: the artist believes he must find a style (or a schtick really) and defend it with his life. And if all the schticks are already taken, he must pull one out of his ass. He must find one, invent one, fabricate one, for he can be nothing if he cannot be original.” —Eddie Campbell

  3. “Style is a capitalist invention. It’s a trademark. It’s very useful in the world of commerce to have a good trademark, but it wasn’t my first concern. I got restless…” —Art Spiegelman

  4. “The way to professional accomplishment: you have to demonstrate that you know something unique, that you can repeat, over, and over and over until ultimately you lose interest in it… The model for personal development is antithetical to the model for professional success….Whenever Picasso learned how to do something he abandoned it.” —Milton Glaser

  5. “In our current cult of originality, the pressure is to have a personal style as soon as possible, and the classroom environments often have this mentality as well. Everyone is freaking out: “What’s my style? What’s my thing?” It’s too much too fast. This race for originality has, over the years, spread from that future-goal timeline to just after college to (now) inside college itself. A safety zone no longer exists.” —Dash Shaw

  6. “When I talk to young composers, I tell them, I know that you’re all worried about finding your voice. Actually you’re going to find your voice. By the time you’re 30, you’ll find it. But that’s not the problem. The problem is getting rid of it.” —Philip Glass

  7. “Don’t worry about a style. It will creep up on you and eventually you will have to undo it in order to go further.” —Gary Panter

Apr 17, 2010
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I wake up every morning at 7:30 and read the paper and drink chocolate milk, then take my daughter to school. I run errands during the day, and tend to get to work at nighttime, going steadily till three in the morning on different things. I put my paintbrush down, and pick up my guitar ten feet away and try out my new flanger pedal for an hour, then I paint for an hour, and then I make something out of chopsticks and flexi-straws, and then I might write a short story. I don’t find that hard to do, it’s just the way I do it. I notice inspiration when it comes by. I don’t sit down at my desk and try to write; rather, I work at something else and then I’ll get an idea for a story and make a note. That’s how I jump from medium to medium. If you keep pushing paint when you’re tired of it, you lose sensitivity. I can only focus on painting for a few hours, so I’ll stop and work on something quite different. Making art, I try to just gently persist, instead of having freak-outs where I’m like, Oh, my god, I’ll never draw again. You are going to draw again, so you might as well relax.

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brandonnn:

hydeordie:

Gary Panter is an artist in residence at Thirty Days NY.

brandonnn:

hydeordie:

Gary Panter is an artist in residence at Thirty Days NY.

Jun 09, 2009
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If you have one person you’re influenced by, everyone will say you’re the next whoever. But if you rip off a hundred people, everyone will say you’re so original!
— Gary Panter at MOCCA ‘09 (via)

Feb 16, 2009
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Because they are trapped in Texas, Texans are self-mythologizing. Because I was trapped in Texas at the time, I needed to believe that the broken tractor out back was a car of the future. Japanese, I’ll say, because of the exotic far-awayness of Japan from Texas, and because of the Japanese monster movies and woodblock prints that reached out to me in Texas. Japanese monster movies are part of the fabric of Texas.
— Gary Panter, on Dal Tokyo

Jun 14, 2008
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Domy Books - June 14 - Gary Panter

excited to see this tonight

Domy Books - June 14 - Gary Panter

excited to see this tonight

Mar 13, 2008
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