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Posts tagged "geography"

Dec 07, 2012
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“You can make these pictures anywhere.” —Photographer Mark Cohen

Cohen has lived in Wilkes-Barre, a “down-on-its-luck small city in northeast Pennsylvania,” for 69 years, where he ran a photo studio and raised his family. In between photographing portraits and weddings, he walked around the city and took pictures, but there wasn’t much of a market for the work and he had a family to support, so he stuck to his day job. Now, he wouldn’t have it any other way:


  He lives in a 4,000-square-foot house and now feels that staying put allowed him to produce better work.
  
  “If I came to New York City and started horsing around and getting in long aesthetic discussions with professors of art, or hanging out with artists at the Cedar Bar? It would have been incredibly distracting.”


(via @sldistin)

“You can make these pictures anywhere.” —Photographer Mark Cohen

Cohen has lived in Wilkes-Barre, a “down-on-its-luck small city in northeast Pennsylvania,” for 69 years, where he ran a photo studio and raised his family. In between photographing portraits and weddings, he walked around the city and took pictures, but there wasn’t much of a market for the work and he had a family to support, so he stuck to his day job. Now, he wouldn’t have it any other way:

He lives in a 4,000-square-foot house and now feels that staying put allowed him to produce better work.

“If I came to New York City and started horsing around and getting in long aesthetic discussions with professors of art, or hanging out with artists at the Cedar Bar? It would have been incredibly distracting.”

(via @sldistin)

Sep 18, 2012
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Jan 19, 2012
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Saul Steinberg, Autogeography, 1966 (via)

From “Descent from Paradise: Saul Steinberg’s Italian Years”:


  For most of his adult life, Saul Steinberg (1914-1999) drew maps—maps of real or imaginary locations, maps of words and of concepts. Often the maps are of actual places refracted through the artist’s mental constructs, as in View of the World from 9th Avenue, his famous March 29, 1976 New Yorker cover, which, reprinted as a poster, copied, and appropriated for many other cities of the world, became his personal nightmare; even today, it remains the icon that most easily identifies him. There is, however, another splendid map, completed ten years earlier; although intended for The New Yorker, it was never fully published in Steinberg’s lifetime. Entitled Autogeography, it is a bird’s-eye view of a green territory dotted with the names of many locales, large and small, from every corner of the world. A very blue, winding river flows through the territory, and on the bottom right it skirts a small lake with an island. On the island is the word “Milano,” while on the shore northeast of the island we find a locality named “Tortoreto (Teramo).”

Saul Steinberg, Autogeography, 1966 (via)

From “Descent from Paradise: Saul Steinberg’s Italian Years”:

For most of his adult life, Saul Steinberg (1914-1999) drew maps—maps of real or imaginary locations, maps of words and of concepts. Often the maps are of actual places refracted through the artist’s mental constructs, as in View of the World from 9th Avenue, his famous March 29, 1976 New Yorker cover, which, reprinted as a poster, copied, and appropriated for many other cities of the world, became his personal nightmare; even today, it remains the icon that most easily identifies him. There is, however, another splendid map, completed ten years earlier; although intended for The New Yorker, it was never fully published in Steinberg’s lifetime. Entitled Autogeography, it is a bird’s-eye view of a green territory dotted with the names of many locales, large and small, from every corner of the world. A very blue, winding river flows through the territory, and on the bottom right it skirts a small lake with an island. On the island is the word “Milano,” while on the shore northeast of the island we find a locality named “Tortoreto (Teramo).”

Nov 25, 2011
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Richard Florida on “The Geography of Stuck”

Nearly six in ten Americans live in the state where they were born, according to the U.S. Census bureau. But there is considerable variation from state to state, as the map (above) by Zara Matheson of the Martin Prosperity Institute shows. More than three quarters of the people in Louisiana (78.9 percent), Michigan (76.6 percent) and Ohio (75.1 percent) were born there…

Compare to this county-by-county map of how people moved in 2010.

Thx, mlarson!

Richard Florida on “The Geography of Stuck”

Nearly six in ten Americans live in the state where they were born, according to the U.S. Census bureau. But there is considerable variation from state to state, as the map (above) by Zara Matheson of the Martin Prosperity Institute shows. More than three quarters of the people in Louisiana (78.9 percent), Michigan (76.6 percent) and Ohio (75.1 percent) were born there…

Compare to this county-by-county map of how people moved in 2010.

Thx, mlarson!

Feb 08, 2011
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"Finished" Red Dead Redemption after a few weekends glued to the XBOX. This quote sums up for me why the game is so excellent:

Westerns are about place….They’re not called outlaw films. They’re not even called cowboys-and-Indians films. They’re called westerns. They’re about geography. We’re talking about a format that is inherently geographical…and you’re talking about a medium, video games, the one thing they do unquestionably better than other mediums is represent geography.

"Finished" Red Dead Redemption after a few weekends glued to the XBOX. This quote sums up for me why the game is so excellent:

Westerns are about place….They’re not called outlaw films. They’re not even called cowboys-and-Indians films. They’re called westerns. They’re about geography. We’re talking about a format that is inherently geographical…and you’re talking about a medium, video games, the one thing they do unquestionably better than other mediums is represent geography.

Jun 15, 2010
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Map: Where Americans Are Moving

More than 10 million Americans moved from one county to another during 2008. The map below visualizes those moves. Click on any county to see comings and goings: black lines indicate net inward movement, red lines net outward movement.

Three maps, three stories.

The top map is Cleveland, where I used to live. Everybody’s leaving. It looks like an explosion.

The middle map is Austin, where I live now. Everybody’s moving here. It looks like a black hole.

The bottom map is Pickaway County, Ohio, where I grew up. Hardly anyone  leaves. Hardly anyone moves in. It looks like a puddle.
Map: Where Americans Are Moving
More than 10 million Americans moved from one county to another during 2008. The map below visualizes those moves. Click on any county to see comings and goings: black lines indicate net inward movement, red lines net outward movement.

Three maps, three stories.

The top map is Cleveland, where I used to live. Everybody’s leaving. It looks like an explosion.

The middle map is Austin, where I live now. Everybody’s moving here. It looks like a black hole.

The bottom map is Pickaway County, Ohio, where I grew up. Hardly anyone leaves. Hardly anyone moves in. It looks like a puddle.

May 26, 2010
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Geography is fate.

May 18, 2010
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Westerns are about place….They’re not called outlaw films. They’re not even called cowboys-and-Indians films. They’re called westerns. They’re about geography. We’re talking about a format that is inherently geographical…and you’re talking about a medium, video games, the one thing they do unquestionably better than other mediums is represent geography.
— Dan Houser, one of Rockstar’s founders, on Red Dead Redemption

Apr 29, 2010
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David Mazzucchelli, Panel from “Discovering America” in Rubber Blanket #2, 1992.  (via)

David Mazzucchelli, Panel from “Discovering America” in Rubber Blanket #2, 1992. (via)

Feb 18, 2010
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