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Posts tagged "kickstarter"

May 10, 2013
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What’s really worth stealing from Kickstarter

  1. Share your process freely—before what you’re working on is done.
  2. Collect emails.
  3. Email people when your thing is ready to buy.

Rinse and repeat.

Jan 21, 2013
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The Campaign for the Accurate Measurement of Creativity by Craighton Berman — Kickstarter

Every day professional “creatives” spend their waking hours sketching, writing, doodling, brainstorming, drawing, and scribbling on paper—hoping that their next amazing idea will eventually appear. This process fuels a unique angst in the modern-day artist; they spend most of their time merely thinking about what to make with nothing physical to show other than a pile of sketches. Can you get credit for creative effort without showing an end product? How is your boss going to know that you spent most of the day working and not just surfing Tumblr? How can you prove to your clients that your rates are justified despite the absence of actual finished work? Can creative output really be measured?

Fun (and totally goofy) idea.

(cf. David Rees + Hemingway: “Wearing down seven number-two pencils is a good day’s work.”)

Oct 15, 2012
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Studio Neat’s It Will Be Exhilarating: Indie Capitalism and Design Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century

Studio Neat is Dan Provost & Tom Gerhardt — two fellas who launched two products I own with very successful Kickstarter projects: the  Cosmonaut, a fabulous iPad stylus, and the Glif, a tripod mount for iPhone. IWBE is a short book about what they’ve learned in the two years of being in business for themselves.


  Don’t make a product because you want to quit your day job… Don’t make a product because you want to get rich.
  
  Make something great because you care deeply about it. Make something because you stay awake at night thinking about it. Make something because you feel invigorated when you work on it, and anxious when you don’t.


Studio Neat is what you might call a “small batch business” — a company intentionally staying small so they can focus on the work they really want to be doing. (The authors quote Walt Disney from back in the day: “We don’t make movies to make money, we make money to make more movies.”)

I picked up their book after seeing a few tweets about their XOXO talk. I particularly liked this bit: “Tell a story. People really do want to see how the sausage gets made.” The idea is that today customers want to feel connected to creators and they want to know where their products come from. This happens best when creators speak directly to their customers, tell stories “straight into the camera,” share lessons, insight, and cool bits of inspiration, and show their behind-the-scenes process(es). “The best way to promote your products and your company is to simply be active online. Do stuff. Make things. Say things. […] By putting things out there, consistently, you can form a relationship with your customers. It allows them to see the person behind the products.”

Dan Provost blogs over at The Russians Used A Pencil

Studio Neat’s It Will Be Exhilarating: Indie Capitalism and Design Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century

Studio Neat is Dan Provost & Tom Gerhardt — two fellas who launched two products I own with very successful Kickstarter projects: the Cosmonaut, a fabulous iPad stylus, and the Glif, a tripod mount for iPhone. IWBE is a short book about what they’ve learned in the two years of being in business for themselves.

Don’t make a product because you want to quit your day job… Don’t make a product because you want to get rich.

Make something great because you care deeply about it. Make something because you stay awake at night thinking about it. Make something because you feel invigorated when you work on it, and anxious when you don’t.

Studio Neat is what you might call a “small batch business” — a company intentionally staying small so they can focus on the work they really want to be doing. (The authors quote Walt Disney from back in the day: “We don’t make movies to make money, we make money to make more movies.”)

I picked up their book after seeing a few tweets about their XOXO talk. I particularly liked this bit: “Tell a story. People really do want to see how the sausage gets made.” The idea is that today customers want to feel connected to creators and they want to know where their products come from. This happens best when creators speak directly to their customers, tell stories “straight into the camera,” share lessons, insight, and cool bits of inspiration, and show their behind-the-scenes process(es). “The best way to promote your products and your company is to simply be active online. Do stuff. Make things. Say things. […] By putting things out there, consistently, you can form a relationship with your customers. It allows them to see the person behind the products.”

Dan Provost blogs over at The Russians Used A Pencil

Jul 23, 2012
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On the good and bad of opening up your creative process to your audience

Here’s Frank Chimero, talking about his experience writing The Shape Of Design:

Kickstarter opens up the creative process to an audience, and makes it feel less like a black box where ‘magic’ happens. This is both good and bad. It’s great because that openness turns a book into a continuum of experiences for the audience. They now have back-story and can connect to the work before they read it. There’s the story of making the story, and you can build a small community of people with that.

On the negative side, that openness turns the process into a kind of performance. The writer has people watching, and that can be stunting. There were several points while writing where things were a total mess, and I felt like I had to be very strategic about what I shared with the backers to make it seem like the train was still on the rails.

Emphasis mine—this is something I’ve been thinking a lot about lately.

For fun, here’s Joan Didion, talking about the writer as a kind of performer:

Somehow writing has always seemed to me to have an element of performance… Sometimes an actor performs a character, but sometimes an actor just performs. With writing, I don’t think it’s performing a character, really, if the character you’re performing is yourself. I don’t see that as playing a role. It’s just appearing in public… not somebody else’s lines. Your lines. Look at me—this is me, is, I think, what you’re saying… I think it develops into a fairly stable thing over time. I think it’s not at all stable at first. But then you kind of grow into the role you have made for yourself… The real person becomes the role you have made for yourself.

Jun 08, 2012
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Fan-funding

When the New York Times covered Amanda Palmer’s triumphant, million $$$ Kickstarter to fund her new record, they quoted former music executive Greg Scholl as replying, “Kurt Cobain wouldn’t have been hawking his Kickstarter campaign.”

I took this as a slag on Palmer and a romanticism of Cobain. So did a lot of people, an on @amandapalmer’s twitter yesterday there quite a bit of noise on the subject.

Scholl responded that he chose a poor example, and what he really meant to say was:

social media enables a new type of audience engagement, and this demands a new and different type of performance

This is a good point, and the major thing Scholl is interested in is: how will this change affect what music gets made? Will we miss out on good stuff, if only performers w/ social media skills or a platform are able to reach audiences?

My friend Rob Lifford came in with an excellent response:

Many artists are already starting to unlock the potential of Kickstarter (and similar tools) in a huge way, but the fans have barely caught on yet. Someday, and I don’t think the day will be too far off at all, an unknown artist — someone who’s an electrifying performer, but fairly inept (or even just inexperienced) with net-based self-promotion — will pull in an eyebrow-raising amount to make a debut album. And it’ll happen via a Kickstarter project initiated and run completely by fans, on the strength of fan-produced audience videos, and little else.

Which brought me back to @waxpancake’s tweet:

I want to see more fans use Kickstarter to commission art. Hire your favorite band to do a house show, your favorite artist to make a comic.

It’s exciting to think that not only can you ask your fans and your community for support, but they could also grab the reins and rally it for you…

I think the bottom line is, the gap between audience and performer, reader and writer, is shrinking, and we’re entering an age in which an artist gets true power by embracing that change and treating it as a chance for collaboration. Amanda Palmer is doing that.

Jun 05, 2012
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Jun 04, 2012
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The pitch you’re making when you pitch to a publisher is a financial one. You’re saying, ‘Here’s my argument for why if you give me this many millions of dollars I’ll return thirty-five times that.’ That’s really the calculation they’re figuring out. If you’re making a pitch to the fans, you’re saying, ‘Hey, I’m gonna do this creative thing that’s gonna be awesome, and who wants to help me?’ It’s not even an argument, it’s more like an invitation to a party.

May 21, 2012
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My iPad doodles of Stephanie Pereira’s Kickstarter talk at the 2012 See Change conference

While listening to Stephanie’s talk, it occured to me that even if you don’t use Kickstarter as your funding model, there’s so much to steal from their model—especially their ideas about how to bring your audience into your story.

My iPad doodles of Stephanie Pereira’s Kickstarter talk at the 2012 See Change conference

While listening to Stephanie’s talk, it occured to me that even if you don’t use Kickstarter as your funding model, there’s so much to steal from their model—especially their ideas about how to bring your audience into your story.

Feb 09, 2012
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Tim Schafer and Double Fine are Kickstartering a point and click adventure game.

I repeat: Tim Schafer and Double Fine are Kickstartering a point and click adventure game.

Filed under: Tim Schafer

Jun 02, 2011
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The Funklet by Jack Stratton — Kickstarter

I want to make a book about drumming that looks good. A funky beat is a great design.

@mattlinderman:

Interesting how often Kickstarter videos are good. Selling something forces ya to be interesting/clear.
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