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Posts tagged "lbj"

Apr 05, 2013
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He wouldn’t know how to pour piss out of a boot if the instructions were printed on the heel.

Dec 16, 2012
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So, my wife referred to Barry Lyndon as Lyndon Johnson, and now I’m imagining what Kubrick’s LBJ biopic would’ve looked like. Pretty sure it begins with LBJ in a helicopter, tossing his Stetson out into the crowd:


  When he’d land, he’d bank the helicopter over and he’d circle around over the field and throw his Stetson hat out over the crowd. Now, that was dramatic and he had about a four-beaver hat, you know. That was a good one. And when he did it, those of us on the ground who were part of the crew, our job was to go get that hat. We had to reclaim that hat and if we didn’t get it, we’d catch “Hail, Columbia” from the boss then.
  
  And he’d say, “Do you know how much that hat cost me? Do you know how much? Have you been in to buy a Stetson hat lately?” We’d say no, of course we wouldn’t ‘cause we didn’t dare wear a hat like it. He said, “That’s coming out of my pocket. You get that hat when we throw it out,” and we’d have to go get that hat.
  
  Usually we could get it, but if you got it recovered by a little 10-year-old boy, it was pretty hard to run up and say, “Son, give me that hat,” and take it away from him. So it wasn’t always pleasant.

So, my wife referred to Barry Lyndon as Lyndon Johnson, and now I’m imagining what Kubrick’s LBJ biopic would’ve looked like. Pretty sure it begins with LBJ in a helicopter, tossing his Stetson out into the crowd:

When he’d land, he’d bank the helicopter over and he’d circle around over the field and throw his Stetson hat out over the crowd. Now, that was dramatic and he had about a four-beaver hat, you know. That was a good one. And when he did it, those of us on the ground who were part of the crew, our job was to go get that hat. We had to reclaim that hat and if we didn’t get it, we’d catch “Hail, Columbia” from the boss then.

And he’d say, “Do you know how much that hat cost me? Do you know how much? Have you been in to buy a Stetson hat lately?” We’d say no, of course we wouldn’t ‘cause we didn’t dare wear a hat like it. He said, “That’s coming out of my pocket. You get that hat when we throw it out,” and we’d have to go get that hat.

Usually we could get it, but if you got it recovered by a little 10-year-old boy, it was pretty hard to run up and say, “Son, give me that hat,” and take it away from him. So it wasn’t always pleasant.

Jan 18, 2011
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LBJ Buys Pants.

putthison:

In 1964, Lyndon Johnson needed pants, so he called the Haggar clothing company and asked for some. The call was recorded (like all White House calls at the time), and has since become the stuff of legend. Johnson’s anatomically specific directions to Mr. Haggar are some of the most intimate words we’ve ever heard from the mouth of a President.

We at Put This On took the historic original audio and gave it to animator Tawd Dorenfeld, who created this majestic fantasia of bungholiana.

Enjoy this special treat from Put This On: LBJ Orders Pants. Then share it with a friend who loves pants.

If you didn’t already know, LBJ was pretty awesome, except for that whole Vietnam thing, but hey…

Before I lived in Texas, I thought King of the Hill was just overblown satire, but no, as this tape makes clear, it’s just straight up realism.

Jul 15, 2010
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LBJ and his dog, Yuki:

Yuki was a mixed breed dog found by President Johnson’s daughter, Luci Nugent, at a gas station in Texas on Thanksgiving Day in 1966, while on her way to the LBJ Ranch. Luci named the dog “Yuki”, which means “snow” in Japanese. At first, Yuki lived with Luci, but while visiting the White House, Yuki won the President’s heart and became his faithful companion. On the President’s birthday, August 27, 1967, Luci told her father that he could keep Yuki. When President Johnson left office on January 20, 1969, Yuki returned to LBJ Ranch with the President on Air Force One. After Johnson’s death in January 1973, Yuki went to live with Luci Johnson Nugent and her family. Yuki died in 1979.


Cell phone crop of a picture I spotted at the Newseum last week while I was in DC.

As you can see, LBJ was a big fan of dogs:

LBJ and his dog, Yuki:

Yuki was a mixed breed dog found by President Johnson’s daughter, Luci Nugent, at a gas station in Texas on Thanksgiving Day in 1966, while on her way to the LBJ Ranch. Luci named the dog “Yuki”, which means “snow” in Japanese. At first, Yuki lived with Luci, but while visiting the White House, Yuki won the President’s heart and became his faithful companion. On the President’s birthday, August 27, 1967, Luci told her father that he could keep Yuki. When President Johnson left office on January 20, 1969, Yuki returned to LBJ Ranch with the President on Air Force One. After Johnson’s death in January 1973, Yuki went to live with Luci Johnson Nugent and her family. Yuki died in 1979.

Cell phone crop of a picture I spotted at the Newseum last week while I was in DC.

As you can see, LBJ was a big fan of dogs:

LBJ and his dogs

Oct 22, 2008
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David Levine’s 1966 caricature of LBJ showing off his scar

From a recent NYTimes article on political caricature:

Levine…created a powerful image of President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966 by alluding to an almost trivial incident: Johnson exposing the scar on his belly from a recent gall bladder operation. But Mr. Levine turned the scar into a defining physical characteristic of the man. He also turned it into his defining political characteristic because the scar was a map of Vietnam. The caricature was accurate to the point of prophecy: it showed the wound that was to bring down the president.

More from the article:

Physically, caricature typically takes a particular feature — a hairdo, a verbal tic, a hand gesture, an accent — and exaggerates it, giving it such prominence that we come to see the person in a new and different light….The word comes from the Italian “caricare,” meaning “to overload.” Some characteristic is heavily piled on: the elongated nose, the prominent belly, the bulbous eyes. Caricature seems to have its earliest associations with portraits that showed human subjects to be transformed animals. This can be just a trick of perception, but the art comes from connecting physical characteristics to character, the way Leonardo da Vinci did in his human-animal hybrids. For a great caricaturist, physiognomy is a reflection of the hidden soul: by showing us something exaggerated, something overlooked is revealed.

(Emphasis mine.)

David Levine’s 1966 caricature of LBJ showing off his scar

From a recent NYTimes article on political caricature:

Levine…created a powerful image of President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966 by alluding to an almost trivial incident: Johnson exposing the scar on his belly from a recent gall bladder operation. But Mr. Levine turned the scar into a defining physical characteristic of the man. He also turned it into his defining political characteristic because the scar was a map of Vietnam. The caricature was accurate to the point of prophecy: it showed the wound that was to bring down the president.
More from the article:
Physically, caricature typically takes a particular feature — a hairdo, a verbal tic, a hand gesture, an accent — and exaggerates it, giving it such prominence that we come to see the person in a new and different light….The word comes from the Italian “caricare,” meaning “to overload.” Some characteristic is heavily piled on: the elongated nose, the prominent belly, the bulbous eyes. Caricature seems to have its earliest associations with portraits that showed human subjects to be transformed animals. This can be just a trick of perception, but the art comes from connecting physical characteristics to character, the way Leonardo da Vinci did in his human-animal hybrids. For a great caricaturist, physiognomy is a reflection of the hidden soul: by showing us something exaggerated, something overlooked is revealed.
(Emphasis mine.)
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