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A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "marginalia"

Dec 16, 2013
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There are books in which the footnotes or comments scrawled by some reader’s hand in the margin are more interesting than the text. The world is one of these books.

Apr 03, 2013
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Nov 01, 2012
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Take Note | An exploration of note-taking in Harvard University Collections

Wonderful exhibit of notes, marginalia, and commonplace books.

(Thx @mattthomas)

Jan 01, 2012
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A Year in Reading — and Scribbling - Interactive Feature - NYTimes.com

Sam Anderson, the magazine’s critic at large and resident marginalia obsessive, selects highlights from a year in reading — and scribbling.

This is the second year @shamblanderson's done his year in marginalia — last year’s was for The Millions. I liked the format of last year’s better—the Times feature puts the page in a weird cropped box you have to zoom around and there’s no transcript for the audio. But hey, it’s still cool.

Filed under: marginalia

Dec 17, 2011
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Full ownership of a book only comes when you have made it a part of yourself, and the best way to make yourself a part of it — which comes to the same thing — is by writing in it. Why is marking a book indispensable to reading it? First, it keeps you awake — not merely conscious, but wide awake. Second, reading, if it is active, is thinking, and thinking tends to express itself in words, spoken or written. The person who says he knows what he thinks but cannot express it usually does not know what he thinks. Third, writing your reactions down helps you to remember the thoughts of the author. Reading a book should be a conversation between you and the author….Marking a book is literally an expression of your differences or your agreements…It is the highest respect you can pay him.
— Mortimer Adler & Charles van Doren on marginalia, in How To Read A Book (via Brain Pickings)

Aug 28, 2011
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Aug 24, 2011
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A page from Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather notebook.



Coppola:

In theatre, there’s something called a prompt book. The prompt book is what the stage manager has, usually a loose-leaf book with all the lighting cues. I make a prompt book out of the novel. In other words, I break the novel, and I glue the pages in a loose-leaf, usually with the square cutout so I can see both sides.

More about the notebook, here.

Via theatlantic::cultfilms::ruinawish

A page from Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather notebook.

Coppola:

In theatre, there’s something called a prompt book. The prompt book is what the stage manager has, usually a loose-leaf book with all the lighting cues. I make a prompt book out of the novel. In other words, I break the novel, and I glue the pages in a loose-leaf, usually with the square cutout so I can see both sides.

More about the notebook, here.

Via theatlantic::cultfilms::ruinawish

(via wnycradiolab)

Aug 06, 2011
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"Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird," by Wallace Stevens, from The Collected Poems

With a minor edit.

Jul 19, 2011
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My new favorite tumblr: theartofgooglebooks

The Art of Google Books was conceived by Krissy Wilson after spending a great deal of time sifting through Google’s digitized books, trying to match the texts of exposed binder’s waste in nineteenth century children’s books with their texts of origin.The aim of this project is twofold; to recognize book digitization as rephotography, and to value the signs of use that accompany these texts as worthy of documentation and study.

Cool shit happens in the process of scanning millions of books.

My new favorite tumblr: theartofgooglebooks

The Art of Google Books was conceived by Krissy Wilson after spending a great deal of time sifting through Google’s digitized books, trying to match the texts of exposed binder’s waste in nineteenth century children’s books with their texts of origin.

The aim of this project is twofold; to recognize book digitization as rephotography, and to value the signs of use that accompany these texts as worthy of documentation and study.

Cool shit happens in the process of scanning millions of books.

(via theartofgooglebooks)

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