TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "mothers"

Nov 14, 2013
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robdelaney:

This is the dedication from my new book.

Delaney wins. (Although he needs to learn to always link to his book!)

robdelaney:

This is the dedication from my new book.

Delaney wins. (Although he needs to learn to always link to his book!)

Feb 06, 2013
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Gimme Shelter

hypem:

bestrooftalkever:

Black History Month Story time:

Merry Clayton - “Gimme Shelter”

Before 1969, Merry Clayton was just a Brooklyn-based singer trying to scrounge up any back-up gig she could find. When The Rolling Stones were recording “Let It Bleed,” they started looking for backup singers for their new song “Gimme Shelter,” and their manager suggested Clayton.

Six months pregnant, Merry came to the studio to record her now-infamous backup track. The Stones themselves were very obviously impressed with her talent. Around 3 minutes into the Stones version, you can even her Jagger let out a “Whoo!” when Merry cracks open the note over the word “Murder.”

Though the recording session put to tape one of the most memorable backup performances in the history of Rock N’ Roll, the memory would not be a good one for Merry Clayton. Just after the session, she suffered a miscarriage in her home. Many blame the intensity of her performance.

When the Stones heard this, they were heartbroken. They approached her and offered partial ownership of the track. They also wanted her to record her own version.

This is it. Be careful, it will melt steel.

Merry said, of the whole ordeal, “That was a dark, dark period for me, but God gave me the strength to overcome it.”

Amazing story.

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Andrea Dezsö’s Embroidered “Lessons From My Mother”

I met Andrea in San Diego last year and was immediately floored by her work. (Also, being 1/4 Romanian but still knowing almost nothing about Romania, I’m always fascinated by Romanian artists.)

NYTimes:

From afar, the stitching and calming colors looked like the work of a doting grandmother, but up close there were images of vaginas, fetuses and a study of the myths that mothers told their daughters in Transylvania, Romania, where Ms. Dezsö, 39, was raised…

Working in the city has provided fodder for many of her ideas and for her embroidery series, which she stitched while traveling throughout the city. A woman stitching in public is viewed differently in different neighborhoods, Ms. Dezsö found.

“If I’m in Queens, people think I’m a traditional woman,” Ms. Dezsö said. “If I’m in Manhattan, it’s the hippest thing.”

See more of Andrea’s work here.

Sep 29, 2011
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An artist is a creature driven by demons. He don’t know why they choose him and he’s usually too busy to wonder why. He is completely amoral in that he will rob, borrow, beg, or steal from anybody and everybody to get the work done. The writer’s only responsibility is to his art. He will be completely ruthless if he is a good one. He has a dream. It anguishes him so much he must get rid of it. He has no peace until then. Everything goes by the board: honor, pride, decency, security, happiness, all, to get the book written. If a writer has to rob his mother, he will not hesitate; the “Ode on a Grecian Urn” is worth any number of old ladies.
— William Faulkner, 1956 Paris Review interview ( Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up to be artists.)

Aug 28, 2011
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In my parents I had the perfect combination—a resistant father and an encouraging mother. My mother convinced me I could do anything. And my father said, “Prove it.” He didn’t think I could make a living. Resistance produces muscularity. And it was the perfect combination because I could use my mother’s belief to overcome my father’s resistance. My father was a kind of a metaphor for the world, because if you can’t overcome a father’s resistance you’re never going to be able to overcome the world’s resistance. It’s much better than having completely supportive parents or completely resistant parents.
Milton Glaser describing the best Gifted & Talented program I’ve heard of

Jun 02, 2011
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They tell you not to write about your mom in books, but I don’t know how you keep from doing that.

Feb 15, 2011
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This was my favorite paragraph in Tina Fey’s New Yorker piece about juggling work and motherhood. She can really write. Our house is looking forward to her book, Bossypants.

This was my favorite paragraph in Tina Fey’s New Yorker piece about juggling work and motherhood. She can really write. Our house is looking forward to her book, Bossypants.

Dec 27, 2010
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betterbooktitles:

Shel Silverstein: The Giving Tree

Yes. This.

betterbooktitles:

Shel Silverstein: The Giving Tree

Yes. This.

Dec 08, 2010
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Please marry me. Your mother likes me.

Aug 09, 2010
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"Julia Warhola," by Andy Warhol,  1974, silkscreen ink and synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 40 x 40 in., from the collection of The Andy Warhol Museum

From “82 Things You Didn’t Know About Andy Warhol”:


20. Julia Warhola moved to New York to live with her son in 1952. Warhol and his mother would live together until 1971, a year before she passed away.

21. His mother often contributed artistically to Warhol’s paintings, and would sometimes sign them for him.

22. Warhol was a self-proclaimed “mama’s boy.”

Lyrics from “Open House" by Lou Reed and John Cale:

It’s a Czechoslovakian custom my mother passed on to me
the way to make friends Andy is invite them up for tea…It’s a Czechoslovakian custom my mother passed on to me
give people little presents so they remember me

"Julia Warhola," by Andy Warhol, 1974, silkscreen ink and synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 40 x 40 in., from the collection of The Andy Warhol Museum

From “82 Things You Didn’t Know About Andy Warhol”:

20. Julia Warhola moved to New York to live with her son in 1952. Warhol and his mother would live together until 1971, a year before she passed away.

21. His mother often contributed artistically to Warhol’s paintings, and would sometimes sign them for him.

22. Warhol was a self-proclaimed “mama’s boy.”

Lyrics from “Open House" by Lou Reed and John Cale:

It’s a Czechoslovakian custom my mother passed on to me
the way to make friends Andy is invite them up for tea

It’s a Czechoslovakian custom my mother passed on to me
give people little presents so they remember me

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