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Posts tagged "my listening year 2013"

Mar 23, 2014
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Can’t stop listening to this new record from The War On Drugs.

Jan 02, 2014
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My listening year, 2013

It almost seems hopelessly old-fashioned in this shuffle/streaming age to make a list of 10 albums, so I’ll balance that first off by starting out with a big Rdio playlist of songs I couldn’t stop playing, which is actually a much clearer picture of what I listened to this year, anyways:

OK, here are 10 albums I liked this year:

Brian Eno, Another Green World

Did you know Phil Collins drums on this album? Enough said. (Ha!)

Augustus Pablo, King Tubbys Meets Rockers Uptown

My buddy @jndevereux gave me a bunch of great reggae/dub to listen to this year and got me listening to Jamaican Gold on our local KOOP station. If you don’t think the melodica could ever be cool, Augustus will prove you wrong.

Parquet Courts, Light Up Gold

Saw these guys at SXSW and thought they were great. Dumb, fast, loud rock ‘n’ roll.

Vampire Weekend, Modern Vampires of the City

How did such a goofy-looking group of motherfuckers make probably the best album of the year?

Bad Sports, Kings Of The Weekend

More loud rock ‘n’ roll. Blasted this album while driving around Denton, Texas, getting stuff together for my art show earlier this year.

Roxy Music, Roxy Music

My go-to dishwashing-with-headphones-on music.

Grizzly Bear, Veckatimest

Here’s why this record is on this list.

Andrew Bird, I Want To See Pulaski At Night

I suppose some people might’ve thought this was just a tossed-off EP with only one actual song (Bird said he wrote the rest of the music as an intro/outro), but I loved it. Wish more artists would put out EPs with tight ideas like this.

Bill Callahan, Dream River

How does he keep putting out such wonderful music? “Small Plane” is the best.

Queens of the Stone Age, …Like Clockwork

My “daddy’s gonna drive to Chipotle now” music.

10 (aw, heck, let’s make it 11) other albums I liked:

Although, if I’m really being honest, my Last.FM top tracks chart paints the most accurate picture of what I listened to:

  1. Gene Chandler – Duke Of Earl
  2. The Tokens – The Lion Sleeps Tonight (Wimoweh)
  3. Sesame Street – Do De Rubber Duck
  4. Caspar Babypants – Row Row Row Your Boat
  5. Sesame Street – Put Down The Duckie
  6. Harry Belafonte – Banana Boat Song (Day-O)
  7. Sesame Street – The Song of the Count
  8. The Muppets – Mah na mah na
  9. Feist – I Feel It All
  10. The Muppets – The Muppet Show Theme

Yes, I’m a dad. Sigh.

Dec 25, 2013
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Awesome Tapes from Africa: Chief Commander Ebenezer Obey & His International Brothers — A Christmas Special By The King of Juju (via)

Great Christmas A.M. jamz. For a guy named Ebenezer, he can really get you in the mood.

Merry Christmas, y’all!

Awesome Tapes from Africa: Chief Commander Ebenezer Obey & His International Brothers — A Christmas Special By The King of Juju (via)

Great Christmas A.M. jamz. For a guy named Ebenezer, he can really get you in the mood.

Merry Christmas, y’all!

Dec 23, 2013
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Queens of the Stone Age on Austin City Limits doing “Smooth Sailing” 

This is great, as is their new album.

(Source: vimeo.com)

Nov 27, 2013
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Sep 12, 2013
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Elvis Costello and The Roots, Wise Up Ghost

Man, I really, really like this album. Out next week. Streaming on NPR.

Elvis Costello and The Roots, Wise Up Ghost

Man, I really, really like this album. Out next week. Streaming on NPR.

Aug 10, 2013
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Arthur Russell, Another Thought

sashafrerejones:


  Arthur Russell’s “Another Thought” is one of the most important out-of-print American albums. Let’s hope someone can fix that.


From Frere-Jones’ portrait of Russell in the New Yorker:


  Even when the songs were recorded in professional studios, the results sound like home recordings, intimate and foggy with breath.


Filed under: Arthur Russell

Arthur Russell, Another Thought

sashafrerejones:

Arthur Russell’s “Another Thought” is one of the most important out-of-print American albums. Let’s hope someone can fix that.

From Frere-Jones’ portrait of Russell in the New Yorker:

Even when the songs were recorded in professional studios, the results sound like home recordings, intimate and foggy with breath.

Filed under: Arthur Russell

Aug 07, 2013
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Bill Callahan, “Expanding Dub

The Singer-Songwriter Bill Callahan Makes a Foray Into Dub

Bill Callahan sketches out his songs lyrics first. The music takes shape once he enters the studio. “I always feel like the sound is already out there,” the 47-year-old singer-songwriter said. “I just need to find it.” Last October, when recording his forthcoming new album, “Dream River” (out Sept. 17), over six days at the Austin, Tex., studio Cacophony, he decided the sound he needed was dub. So he left room in the arrangements of several songs to give himself the option of concocting dub interpretations.

I could work on this book a lot easier if the new Bill Callahan was here…

Filed under: Bill Callahan, my listening year 2013

Jun 07, 2013
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Al Green, “Loving You,” The Belle Album, 1978

Here’s a damned fine Al Green album you might not own. It’s the first one he produced himself without the help of Willie Mitchell and his normal gang. Here’s Greil Marcus:

This is a completely idiosyncratic album — Green produced it, cowrote all the songs and plays precise acoustic and electric guitar — but it’s hard for me to understand how anyone could find it inaccessible. Its subject matter — God’s grace, and how good it (It?) feels — isn’t pushed; there’s no ad for Green’s ministry on the back cover, and while most of the lyrics are religious, the only song title that even hints at anything beyond the secular realm is “Chariots of Fire.”

When you come to love, in hindsight, an artist with a long, varied career, you tend miss the gems like this. There’s something about this day and age of abundance, when there’s so much you could listen to, that makes me, even with artists I love, not bother tracking stuff like this down because it seems “minor,” and I stick to whatever Allmusic.com tells me are the “classics” worth my time. And lets face it: whether something is a “classic” means nothing as to whether you’ll actually like it. What a stupid mistake to make.

I’ve had the same experience with “minor” Woody Allen movies and recently Kurt Vonnegut’s Bluebeard—not a “classic” necessarily, but solid, enjoyable work that, because it’s an artist you like, is still better than the best stuff from another artist.

Anyways. This is a great album.

Filed under: my listening year 2013

(Source: escoinspired, via escoinspired)

Jun 06, 2013
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The tape which first inspired Paul Simon to visit South Africa in 1985 to record Graceland

If you’re a fan of Graceland, there’s a pretty amazing mix called “Paths To Graceland” that my friend @anorwood sent me of music similar to what inspired Simon’s album.

The tape which first inspired Paul Simon to visit South Africa in 1985 to record Graceland

If you’re a fan of Graceland, there’s a pretty amazing mix called “Paths To Graceland” that my friend @anorwood sent me of music similar to what inspired Simon’s album.

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