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Posts tagged "new yorker"

Jun 30, 2014
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10 things I didn’t know about Richard Linklater

There’s a really terrific profile of filmmaker Richard Linklater in this week’s New Yorker. (Here’s a podcast of the writer, Nathan Heller (@nathanheller), talking about Linklater’s work—the drawing above is something I doodled at SXSW in 2009.)

10 interesting things I discovered while reading the piece:

1. He started as a playwright, but watching movies helped him discover he could think in terms of images.

He was still writing short stories, and, as an exercise, tried adapting one into a screenplay. “I could see the whole movie in my head—all the shots and angles. I thought, Oh, I’ve got this visual thing.”

2. He went to college on a baseball scholarship

He recalls daydreaming in the outfield about how he wished he had more time to read. He then contracted an infection in his heart, and all the sudden, he was forbidden to play baseball. He spent the rest of his sophomore year staying up late in the college library, writing.

3. He quit college to work on an oil rig

If he wasn’t playing baseball, he’d have to make up the time in work-study employment, and he didn’t want to do that. A friend helped him get a summer job working on an oil rig. It paid well, and gave him many free hours to read and write, so Linklater asked if he could stay on that fall. He never returned to school.

4. In his early twenties, he watched 600 films a year

whenever he came back to the mainland, in Houston, he would watch movies: first two a day, then three, then four… “I felt I’d discovered something, like this whole world had opened up,“ he says. “I was greedy for it.”

5. He moved to Austin in 1983 with $18,000 in savings

He bought some film equipment and would “write, shoot, edit, and watch film eighteen hours a day.”

6. Slacker was filmed for $23,000

It got picked up for national distribution and eventually “made back more than fifty times its tiny budget.”

7. He re-writes his screenplays during rehearsal

He schedules a lot of rehearsal time—two solid weeks or so before production starts—and goes through each scene in an open-ended way, talking about character motivations and getting actors to riff. Most of the rehearsal time is spent rewriting the screenplay, line by line, drawing out and molding his work against performers’ strengths and styles.

8. He offers his stars percentage points instead of Hollywood fees

He calls this “betting on myself,” and if the bet is good, which it almost always is, it makes the director as free and self-sovereign as a novelist.

9. He lost most of his archives in the 2011 Bastrop wildfires

One of the few structures untouched by the fire was the library, a small two-story building clad with multicolored tile, where Linklater likes to write. The preservation of his work space was striking to him. By 2011, he had reached a phase of comfortable accomplishment… “I felt done,” he said… The blaze, in some peculiar way, demotivated him. “The fire came, and it was like, Oh, O.K. You don’t want me to be done.”

10. He’s working on a movie about the American Transcendentalists

Emerson, Thoreau, and the gang. He’s been working on it for 15 years, but “hasn’t found a way to make something that isn’t a ‘bonnet movie’ period piece.”

Jun 20, 2014
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RIP cartoonist Charles Barsotti 1933-2014

My favorite signature in the New Yorker. He grew up just down the road:

Charles Barsotti – or “Charley,” as nearly everyone called him – was born September 28, 1933, in San Marcos, Texas. “Everything down there either had thorns on it or bit,” he said of his hometown when I interviewed him in January 2013, “and that includes the adults.” Howard, his father, sold furniture in San Antonio, where Charley was raised. His mother, the delightfully named Dicey Belle Branum, was a schoolteacher. Barsotti credited his hard-working parents with inspiring his own determined work ethic. “That, and fear,” he added.

If you’re unfamiliar with his work, Bob Mankoff has a nice small gallery of his cartoons, and there’s a collection called, simply, The Essential Charles Barsotti.

Jun 15, 2014
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newyorker:

The cartoonist Paul Karasik explains why his candidate for the perfect cartoon is this classic by Peter Arno: http://nyr.kr/1itW3KY

Arno is amazing. I love this era of New Yorker cartooning. (See also: Charles Addams)

newyorker:

The cartoonist Paul Karasik explains why his candidate for the perfect cartoon is this classic by Peter Arno: http://nyr.kr/1itW3KY

Arno is amazing. I love this era of New Yorker cartooning. (See also: Charles Addams)

(Source: newyorker.com)

Dec 08, 2012
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Saul Steinberg New Yorker Covers

Steinberg did 87 covers for the New Yorker. Eighty-seven! (You can see most of the covers and his illustrations in Saul Steinberg at the New Yorker)

Filed under: Saul Steinberg

Oct 19, 2012
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Barry Blitt covers Norman Rockwell

newyorker:

Next week’s cover, “Skin Deep,” by Barry Blitt, pays homage to the Norman Rockwell painting “The Tattoo Artist.” We asked Blitt how he came up with this idea. “My grandfather was a Sunday painter, he used to copy a lot of Norman Rockwell paintings, so I was aware of all the classic images at a very young age,” he told us. “Mitt Romney looks like he stepped out of one of those pictures.”

Blitt is so good. (via)

Jul 30, 2012
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Jul 29, 2012
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Analog Instapaper.

Jul 01, 2012
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newyorker:

Cartoon of the night. For more from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/MLv8gn

Great Matt Diffee cartoon.

newyorker:

Cartoon of the night. For more from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/MLv8gn

Great Matt Diffee cartoon.

May 13, 2012
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"Face painting five bucks," New Yorker cartoon by Matthew Diffee.

This made me literally LOL. (via)

"Face painting five bucks," New Yorker cartoon by Matthew Diffee.

This made me literally LOL. (via)

Sep 29, 2011
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Joost Swarte in the March 21, 2011 New Yorker

via murketing > Significant Objects

Joost Swarte in the March 21, 2011 New Yorker

via murketing > Significant Objects

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