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Posts tagged "newspapers"

Sep 26, 2014
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Carl Hiaasen, Basket Case

A whodunit which is actually a sendup of working at a modern newspaper. Fun read. Hiaasen in the NYTimes:


  The Florida in my novels is not as seedy as the real Florida. It’s hard to stay ahead of the curve. Every time I write a scene that I think is the sickest thing I have ever dreamed up, it is surpassed by something that happens in real life.


Adam Gopnik wrote a good NYer piece on Florida crime fiction in 2013:


  The cop or, more frequently, the reporter isn’t trying to restore chivalry to a world gone corrupt. It’s too far gone already. He is merely trying to assert ordinary decency in a world gone crazy: women shouldn’t be abused; nature shouldn’t be endlessly exploited; cockroaches shouldn’t be placed in yogurt cups to scam the justice system for payouts. Where in the noir tradition crimes took place, melodramatically, at night, here they take place, matter-of-factly, in the middle of the day.


I always wonder whether Hiaasen follows @_FloridaMan on Twitter.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Carl Hiaasen, Basket Case

A whodunit which is actually a sendup of working at a modern newspaper. Fun read. Hiaasen in the NYTimes:

The Florida in my novels is not as seedy as the real Florida. It’s hard to stay ahead of the curve. Every time I write a scene that I think is the sickest thing I have ever dreamed up, it is surpassed by something that happens in real life.

Adam Gopnik wrote a good NYer piece on Florida crime fiction in 2013:

The cop or, more frequently, the reporter isn’t trying to restore chivalry to a world gone corrupt. It’s too far gone already. He is merely trying to assert ordinary decency in a world gone crazy: women shouldn’t be abused; nature shouldn’t be endlessly exploited; cockroaches shouldn’t be placed in yogurt cups to scam the justice system for payouts. Where in the noir tradition crimes took place, melodramatically, at night, here they take place, matter-of-factly, in the middle of the day.

I always wonder whether Hiaasen follows @_FloridaMan on Twitter.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Jun 22, 2014
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TimesMachines.NYTimes.com

I somehow missed that this existed — like, microfilm, but 1000x better.

(via kottke.org)

TimesMachines.NYTimes.com

I somehow missed that this existed — like, microfilm, but 1000x better.

(via kottke.org)

May 08, 2014
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Jan 05, 2013
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The numbers say whatever you want them to say. (via @SteveCase)

The numbers say whatever you want them to say. (via @SteveCase)

Jan 04, 2013
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Back to the Future’s Terrible Newspaper

braiker:

shortformblog:

nedhepburn:

Back to the Future’s Terrible Newspaper

“It is equally unclear why the Telegraph’s editors would devote such extensive space to Biff Tannen gambling coverage.”

Dec 08, 2012
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Save The Cleveland Plain Dealer

The Cleveland Plain Dealer tells says it plans to cut about one-third of newsroom staff. If you immediately think, “Who cares?” remember that Ohio is a swing state, and the political coverage that the PD provides is crucial.


  The Plain Dealer has told the Guild it plans to reduce the number of Guild members in the newsroom to 110 next year. Guild members are the heart of the paper. They report, photograph, copyedit, design, draw, create graphics, archive information, edit and so much more. The reductions, which represent about 1/3 of our membership, would be devastating to the news-gathering operation. The paper said most of the reduction would be through layoffs, though some employees will be offered jobs at cleveland.com. They will not say how many or what those jobs would be. The Plain Dealer is pressing for the ability to handpick who stays and who goes.


The truly shitty part of it all is that even during the worst years, the PD has stayed in the black and made money. CJR:


  The problem is that rather than using the new-found cash flow created by reducing operating costs to support its news operations, Advance is gutting its newsroom, getting its community off the habit of a daily paper, and moving to what looks for all the world like a hamster-wheel model online.


The problem with a click-driven, volume-based digital model is that the “news becomes a constant stream of bits and pieces designed to attract viewers”:


  “What happens under that model is that the stories that get the most clicks are sex, crime and sports,” Spector said. “That’s a real shift of emphasis where housing and education and other things fall. And then you cut staff and lose coverage and than what? You have to wonder how much serious journalism will get done.”


For obvious reasons, my heart sinks whenever more news hits of a newspaper’s demise, but this news hits our family particularly hard: my father-in-law has worked at the PD for almost 30 years. He’s a wonderful writer and a real inspiration to me, but also one with seniority, and therefore, expensive. For now, we cross our fingers.

Follow the cause on Facebook→

Save The Cleveland Plain Dealer

The Cleveland Plain Dealer tells says it plans to cut about one-third of newsroom staff. If you immediately think, “Who cares?” remember that Ohio is a swing state, and the political coverage that the PD provides is crucial.

The Plain Dealer has told the Guild it plans to reduce the number of Guild members in the newsroom to 110 next year. Guild members are the heart of the paper. They report, photograph, copyedit, design, draw, create graphics, archive information, edit and so much more. The reductions, which represent about 1/3 of our membership, would be devastating to the news-gathering operation. The paper said most of the reduction would be through layoffs, though some employees will be offered jobs at cleveland.com. They will not say how many or what those jobs would be. The Plain Dealer is pressing for the ability to handpick who stays and who goes.

The truly shitty part of it all is that even during the worst years, the PD has stayed in the black and made money. CJR:

The problem is that rather than using the new-found cash flow created by reducing operating costs to support its news operations, Advance is gutting its newsroom, getting its community off the habit of a daily paper, and moving to what looks for all the world like a hamster-wheel model online.

The problem with a click-driven, volume-based digital model is that the “news becomes a constant stream of bits and pieces designed to attract viewers”:

“What happens under that model is that the stories that get the most clicks are sex, crime and sports,” Spector said. “That’s a real shift of emphasis where housing and education and other things fall. And then you cut staff and lose coverage and than what? You have to wonder how much serious journalism will get done.”

For obvious reasons, my heart sinks whenever more news hits of a newspaper’s demise, but this news hits our family particularly hard: my father-in-law has worked at the PD for almost 30 years. He’s a wonderful writer and a real inspiration to me, but also one with seniority, and therefore, expensive. For now, we cross our fingers.

Follow the cause on Facebook→

Dec 12, 2011
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“Some holidays are unforgettable.” This morning’s NYTimes.com had a really unfortunate ad placement. (Granted, this happens a lot.) A few folks on Twitter had a good point: is there a front page news story that wouldn’t make this ad seem inappropriate?

“Some holidays are unforgettable.” This morning’s NYTimes.com had a really unfortunate ad placement. (Granted, this happens a lot.) A few folks on Twitter had a good point: is there a front page news story that wouldn’t make this ad seem inappropriate?

Jul 20, 2011
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Buy a newspaper. Cut it up. Throw away the ads. Sort the remaining stories into piles. Now, describe the editorial logic holding those piles together.
— Clay Shirky, “Why We Need the New News Environment to be Chaotic" (“Outside a relative handful of financial publications, there is no such thing as the news business. There is only the advertising business.”)

May 10, 2011
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Somebody is reading a newspaper, and his eye follows the column in the proper Aristotelian manner, one idea and sentence at a time. But subliminally he is reading the columns on either side and is aware of the person sitting next to him. That’s a cut-up.

Apr 25, 2011
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The Smithsonian Collection of Newspaper Comics edited by Bill Blackbeard

This is such a great book. Here’s Chris Ware on how big of an influence the book was on him:

As an undergraduate student and aspiring cartoonist, the book laid open most often on my drawing table was Blackbeard and Sheridan’s weighty “Smithsonian Book of Newspaper Comics.” For years I’d been led to believe by various comic book aficionados that the zenith of achievement for the medium were the EC comic books of the 1950s, but after discovering the Smithsonian book, it became all too clear to me that the real original geniuses of the medium were the pre-cinema cartoonists of the throwaway sunday supplements of a half century prior. As a general history, the book evenly balanced a necessary all-inclusivity with an otherwise gently insistent esthetic sophistication, which was something of a virtuosic tightrope act of curation: covering everything while still allowing the greats to shine….the strips were presented in a warm, large, full-color format which at the time must have been extraordinarily expensive, but allowed their complicated and intricate compositions to be truly re-appreciated; earlier histories of comics had tended towards text-clotted black and white tour schedules, amputating single panels and freeze-drying them in black and white as little more than passing souvenirs of an outmoded 19th and early 20th century naïveté.

Ware liked one of the Gasoline Alley strips so much that he tore out the page and hung it in his studio.

It’s out of print, but I’ve always seen copies at my local Half Price Books.

The Smithsonian Collection of Newspaper Comics edited by Bill Blackbeard

This is such a great book. Here’s Chris Ware on how big of an influence the book was on him:

As an undergraduate student and aspiring cartoonist, the book laid open most often on my drawing table was Blackbeard and Sheridan’s weighty “Smithsonian Book of Newspaper Comics.” For years I’d been led to believe by various comic book aficionados that the zenith of achievement for the medium were the EC comic books of the 1950s, but after discovering the Smithsonian book, it became all too clear to me that the real original geniuses of the medium were the pre-cinema cartoonists of the throwaway sunday supplements of a half century prior. As a general history, the book evenly balanced a necessary all-inclusivity with an otherwise gently insistent esthetic sophistication, which was something of a virtuosic tightrope act of curation: covering everything while still allowing the greats to shine….the strips were presented in a warm, large, full-color format which at the time must have been extraordinarily expensive, but allowed their complicated and intricate compositions to be truly re-appreciated; earlier histories of comics had tended towards text-clotted black and white tour schedules, amputating single panels and freeze-drying them in black and white as little more than passing souvenirs of an outmoded 19th and early 20th century naïveté.

Ware liked one of the Gasoline Alley strips so much that he tore out the page and hung it in his studio.

It’s out of print, but I’ve always seen copies at my local Half Price Books.

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