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A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "originality"

Jan 15, 2014
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I’m just sort of trying to find a place to pound my nails… It seems like there’s a board there and all the nails are pounded in all over the place, you know, and every new person that comes to pound in a nail finds that there’s one less space, you know… I’m content with the same old piece of wood, I just want to find another place to pound in a nail.
Bob Dylan to Studs Turkel, 1963, transcribed in And They All Sang

Dec 02, 2013
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Any claim I might make to originality in my fiction is really just the result of [my] odd background: basically, just me working inefficiently, with flawed tools, in a mode I don’t have sufficient background to really understand. Like if you put a welder to designing dresses.

Jun 15, 2013
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I seem almost a plagiarist. [I quote a lot because I’m] just trying to be honorable and not to steal things. I’ve always felt that if a thing had been said in the best way, how can you say it better? If I wanted to say something and somebody had said it ideally, then I’d take it but give the person credit for it. That’s all there is to it. If you are charmed by an author, I think it’s a very strange and invalid imagination that doesn’t long to share it. Somebody else should read it, don’t you think?

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Ivan Brunetti, Aesthetics: A Memoir

Brunetti’s an interesting guy. I love the spirit of the introduction—his humility and his contentment with just being one small member in a tribe of craftsmen…


  I am aware that there is no originality in my work, that pretty much all I am doing essentially is making my own version of Peanuts (crossed with Robert Crumb) and a vastly, hopelessly inferior one at that….No matter. I am happy to be a subatomic particle whizzing around inside the seemingly infinite ocean of cartooning.


…and the the book trailer…


  As a teacher, I like to encourage my students to explore their own past and explore the things that shaped them. And from there, I think you can use that as raw material for whatever [else] you want to explore. I don’t think anyone should be ashamed of where they came from or the things that aesthetically shaped them….
  
  I’m sure people will look at my drawing style and think, “That’s pretty simple. I can do that.” And actually, I think that’s good. That’s what I want people to say. Hopefully it will inspire someone to feel like they can do it and that they can take whatever limited ability or limited means…even just using the cheapest materials. […] The hardest thing for most people is simply getting started. That’s my hope [for this book] really: that people will look through it and just feel inspired to make something of their own and start valuing whatever it is they make.


If you haven’t read his book, Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice, it’s $10, and probably the best guide to cartooning ever written.

Ivan Brunetti, Aesthetics: A Memoir

Brunetti’s an interesting guy. I love the spirit of the introduction—his humility and his contentment with just being one small member in a tribe of craftsmen…

I am aware that there is no originality in my work, that pretty much all I am doing essentially is making my own version of Peanuts (crossed with Robert Crumb) and a vastly, hopelessly inferior one at that….No matter. I am happy to be a subatomic particle whizzing around inside the seemingly infinite ocean of cartooning.

…and the the book trailer

As a teacher, I like to encourage my students to explore their own past and explore the things that shaped them. And from there, I think you can use that as raw material for whatever [else] you want to explore. I don’t think anyone should be ashamed of where they came from or the things that aesthetically shaped them….

I’m sure people will look at my drawing style and think, “That’s pretty simple. I can do that.” And actually, I think that’s good. That’s what I want people to say. Hopefully it will inspire someone to feel like they can do it and that they can take whatever limited ability or limited means…even just using the cheapest materials. […] The hardest thing for most people is simply getting started. That’s my hope [for this book] really: that people will look through it and just feel inspired to make something of their own and start valuing whatever it is they make.

If you haven’t read his book, Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice, it’s $10, and probably the best guide to cartooning ever written.

(Source: yalepress.yale.edu)

Apr 16, 2013
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Mar 15, 2013
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Don’t get it original, get it right.
— Edward Tufte

Jan 30, 2013
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I used to want to make poems as though poetry or even speech hadn’t existed before me. Now I work at the other end of the spectrum, making poems mostly out of what already exists, and somehow finding that fresher. More mysterious.
— Peter Cole, from “The Invention of Influence: A Notebook,” in Poetry. (via ecantwell)

Jan 09, 2013
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Ideas, in a sense, are overrated. Of course, you need good ones, but at this point in our supersaturated culture, precious few are so novel that nobody else has ever thought of them before. It’s really about where you take the idea, and how committed you are to solving the endless problems that come up in the execution.

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Art and design schools still nurture the image of the genius designer as an individual artist. Originality is rewarded as a higher standard than com-munication, and copying is considered a sin.

Dec 05, 2012
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Copycat Movie Posters

Nobody copies like Hollywood and advertising. Put them together? Things get even worse.

But before you get too upset, remember what these posters are for: they’re a kind of visual shorthand for genre. The fact that they all look alike is, to the marketing department, a feature, not a bug.

The first thing I learned as a librarian: you can judge a book by its cover, or at least its genre.

Copycat Movie Posters

Nobody copies like Hollywood and advertising. Put them together? Things get even worse.

But before you get too upset, remember what these posters are for: they’re a kind of visual shorthand for genre. The fact that they all look alike is, to the marketing department, a feature, not a bug.

The first thing I learned as a librarian: you can judge a book by its cover, or at least its genre.

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