TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "pablo picasso"

Feb 24, 2014
Permalink

Picasso’s Constellations

What are we looking at? According to biographer John Richardson, in the summer of 1924, “The splendor of the meridonal sky … inspired Picasso to create his own constellations: ink dots connected by fine pen lines that turn the zodiac into guitars and mandolins and the crotchen-dotted staves of musical scores.”

Dec 27, 2012
Permalink
The Vampire Test

The Romanian sculptor Constantin Brâncuși refused to hang out with Pablo Picasso because he thought Picasso sucked all the energy and ideas out of the people around him. (Brâncuși hailed from the Carpathian Mountains, and he knew a vampire when he saw one.)

Brâncuși practiced what I call “The Vampire Test.” It’s is a simple way to know who you should let in and out of your life:

If after a night of hanging out with someone you feel full of energy and ideas, that person is not a vampire.

If after a night of hanging out with someone you feel exhausted and depleted, that persion is a vampire.

The vampires in your life can’t be cured. Your best bet is to stay away from them. As Lynda Barry said, “You cannot fix Dracula by trying to convince him to just party in the sun with you.“

More from Show Your Work! →

The Vampire Test

The Romanian sculptor Constantin Brâncuși refused to hang out with Pablo Picasso because he thought Picasso sucked all the energy and ideas out of the people around him. (Brâncuși hailed from the Carpathian Mountains, and he knew a vampire when he saw one.)

Brâncuși practiced what I call “The Vampire Test.” It’s is a simple way to know who you should let in and out of your life:

If after a night of hanging out with someone you feel full of energy and ideas, that person is not a vampire.

If after a night of hanging out with someone you feel exhausted and depleted, that persion is a vampire.

The vampires in your life can’t be cured. Your best bet is to stay away from them. As Lynda Barry said, “You cannot fix Dracula by trying to convince him to just party in the sun with you.“

More from Show Your Work!

Nov 20, 2012
Permalink

Pablo Picasso, Dream and Lie of Franco, 1937

Wikipedia:

The Dream and Lie of Franco is a series of two sheets of prints, comprising individual 18 images, and an accompanying prose poem, by Pablo Picasso produced in 1937… [It is] Picasso’s first overtly political work and prefigures his iconic political painting Guernica. […] The individual images were originally intended to be published as postcards to raise funds for the Spanish Republican government, and sold at the Spanish Pavilion of the 1937 World’s Fair, although it is unclear whether any prints were made or sold in postcard format.

(via @tomgauld)

Aug 07, 2012
Permalink

Einstein and Picasso compare drawings (from Steve Martin's PICASSO AT THE LAPIN AGILE)

  • EINSTEIN: It's perfect.
  • PICASSO: Thank you.
  • EINSTEIN: I'm talking about mine.
  • PICASSO: It's a formula.
  • EINSTEIN: So's yours.
  • PICASSO: It was a little hastily drawn… Yours is letters.
  • EINSTEIN: Yours is lines.
  • PICASSO: My lines mean something.
  • EINSTEIN: So do mine.
  • PICASSO: Mine is beautiful.
  • EINSTEIN: Men have swooned on seeing that (indicates his own drawing).
  • PICASSO: Mine touches the heart.
  • EINSTEIN: Mine touches the head.
  • PICASSO: (holds his drawing): This will change the future.
  • EINSTEIN: (holds his drawing): Oh, and this won't?

Permalink

Show Your Work! Episode 1: Vampires

A short video about Picasso, Brancusi, and how to tell if you have a vampire problem in your life.

New animated video series I’m working on!

May 26, 2012
Permalink

Picasso, the vampire

Here’s a fun art story about the Romanian sculptor Constantin Brâncuși and Pablo “Art is theft” Picasso, from John Richardson’s A Life of Picasso: The Triumphant Years, 1917-1932 (Vol 3).

Brancusi, who’d had several of his sculptural ideas ripped off from Pablo, “was anything but an admirer of Picasso or his work”:

[He] disapproved of [one of] of Picasso’s fundamental characteristics—one that was all too familiar to the latter’s fellow artists and friends—his habit of making off not so much with their ideas as with their energy. “Picass is a cannibal,” Brancusi said. He had a point. After a pleasurable day in Picasso’s company, those present were apt to end up suffering from collective nervous exhaustion. Picasso had made off with their energy and would go off to his studio and spend all night living off it. Brancusi hailed from vampire country and knew about such things, and he was not going to have his energy or the fruits of his energy appropriated by Picasso.

Lynda Barry has a bit where she talks about choosing to hang out with werewolves instead of vampires. I tried to find it online, but all I found was this bit, which I think Brancusi would’ve dug:

Mar 17, 2012
Permalink

Feb 15, 2012
Permalink

Jan 15, 2012
Permalink
Most inventors and engineers I’ve met are like me … they live in their heads. They’re almost like artists. In fact, the very best of them are artists. And artists work best alone …. I’m going to give you some advice that might be hard to take. That advice is: Work alone… Not on a committee. Not on a team.
— Steve Wozniak, quoted in an article about the creative benefits of solitude. cf. Pablo Picasso: “Without great solitude, no serious work is possible.” (The author of the article, Susan Cain, has a new book coming out: Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking)

Nov 10, 2011
Permalink
Subscribe to my newsletter and get new art, writing, and interesting links delivered to your inbox every week.