TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about. Ask me anything you can't Google.



Posts tagged "rolling stones"

Oct 20, 2013
Permalink

merlin:

The Who - “A Quick One While He’s Away” (The Rolling Stone’s Rock ‘n Roll Circus, 1968)

If I hear the song, I post the video.

It’s a compulsion and a gift to you.

Behold, again: my evergreen candidate for the greatest rock ‘n roll performance I’ve ever seen. Full stop.

Dang, dang, dang, dang, dang, dang, dang, dang!

This video also shows you how much Bob Pollard nicked from The Who for GBV. (BTW, Rock and Roll Circus contains some of my favorite Rolling Stones cuts — especially “Jumpin’ Jack Flash,” but even “You Can’t Always Get What You Want,” which I usually hate, is stripped down and awesome.)

Feb 06, 2013
Permalink

Gimme Shelter

hypem:

bestrooftalkever:

Black History Month Story time:

Merry Clayton - “Gimme Shelter”

Before 1969, Merry Clayton was just a Brooklyn-based singer trying to scrounge up any back-up gig she could find. When The Rolling Stones were recording “Let It Bleed,” they started looking for backup singers for their new song “Gimme Shelter,” and their manager suggested Clayton.

Six months pregnant, Merry came to the studio to record her now-infamous backup track. The Stones themselves were very obviously impressed with her talent. Around 3 minutes into the Stones version, you can even her Jagger let out a “Whoo!” when Merry cracks open the note over the word “Murder.”

Though the recording session put to tape one of the most memorable backup performances in the history of Rock N’ Roll, the memory would not be a good one for Merry Clayton. Just after the session, she suffered a miscarriage in her home. Many blame the intensity of her performance.

When the Stones heard this, they were heartbroken. They approached her and offered partial ownership of the track. They also wanted her to record her own version.

This is it. Be careful, it will melt steel.

Merry said, of the whole ordeal, “That was a dark, dark period for me, but God gave me the strength to overcome it.”

Amazing story.

May 27, 2012
Permalink
Bobby Womack and Ron Wood, 1975

There’s a fantastic Guardian interview with Bobby Womack online, conducted recently in his hospital room, after getting the all-clear from colon cancer:


  …everything he says is fascinating, an endless stream of anecdotes with an impossibly starry cast drawn from what may be the most remarkable CV in music: he is, as Albarn notes, “like Zelig”. He formed his first gospel group with his five brothers before he had reached his teens. A few years later, their father kicked them out when they announced they wanted to play secular music. They were mentored by Sam Cooke, who moved them to LA and whose band Womack joined, touring a segregated America. “Sam used to tell me, whenever you got some money, you go get yourself a good ring and a good watch. Why would I need that? And Sam would say, you might have to get outta town quickly, before you get paid, and you can always hock that ring and that watch.”
  
  He played with James Brown and Ray Charles and toured with a young Jimi Hendrix. He wrote It’s All Over Now, which the Rolling Stones turned into a global hit…
  He spent time as a session guitarist in Memphis, where he played with Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett and on Dusty Springfield’s Dusty In Memphis. He also played on Elvis Presley’s Suspicious Minds, which didn’t impress him much either. “People say: ‘What did you think of Elvis Presley?’ I say: ‘He wasn’t shit. Everything he got he stole.’”


Here’s a great new site of Bobby’s history — I was so excited to see Bobby in Houston next weekend, but now they’ve postponed the show until June 30th. Still, I feel lucky he’s still coming!

Here’s a little Rdio playlist of his career I put together:

Bobby Womack and Ron Wood, 1975

There’s a fantastic Guardian interview with Bobby Womack online, conducted recently in his hospital room, after getting the all-clear from colon cancer:

…everything he says is fascinating, an endless stream of anecdotes with an impossibly starry cast drawn from what may be the most remarkable CV in music: he is, as Albarn notes, “like Zelig”. He formed his first gospel group with his five brothers before he had reached his teens. A few years later, their father kicked them out when they announced they wanted to play secular music. They were mentored by Sam Cooke, who moved them to LA and whose band Womack joined, touring a segregated America. “Sam used to tell me, whenever you got some money, you go get yourself a good ring and a good watch. Why would I need that? And Sam would say, you might have to get outta town quickly, before you get paid, and you can always hock that ring and that watch.”

He played with James Brown and Ray Charles and toured with a young Jimi Hendrix. He wrote It’s All Over Now, which the Rolling Stones turned into a global hit… He spent time as a session guitarist in Memphis, where he played with Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett and on Dusty Springfield’s Dusty In Memphis. He also played on Elvis Presley’s Suspicious Minds, which didn’t impress him much either. “People say: ‘What did you think of Elvis Presley?’ I say: ‘He wasn’t shit. Everything he got he stole.’”

Here’s a great new site of Bobby’s history — I was so excited to see Bobby in Houston next weekend, but now they’ve postponed the show until June 30th. Still, I feel lucky he’s still coming!

Here’s a little Rdio playlist of his career I put together:

Jan 21, 2012
Permalink

Tonight's The NIght

Neil Young, “Borrowed Tune,” off Tonight’s The Night (1973)

I’m singin’ this borrowed tune
I took from the Rolling Stones
Alone in this empty room
Too wasted to write my own.

Tune lifted from The Rolling Stones’ “Lady Jane.”

(Source: bongtrooper)

Nov 21, 2011
Permalink

The Rolling Stones’ Cut-ups

In the documentary about the making of The Rolling Stones’ Exile On Main Street, Stones In Exile, Mick Jagger talks about coming up with lyrics after all the songs for the record were written. For the song “Casino Boogie,” Jagger and Keith Richards “just did this William Burroughs thing” where they “did all cut-ups and just wrote phrases and chucked them into a pile and picked them out.”

Again: avant-garde techniques often work better in the service of pop.

Thanks to John Martz for the heads up on this!

Dec 14, 2010
Permalink
Subscribe to my newsletter and get new art, writing, and interesting links delivered to your inbox every week.