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Posts tagged "saul steinberg"

Feb 13, 2014
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thinkprocessnotproduct:

Saul Steinberg’s studio, 1959

Photographed by Inge Morath

Filed under: Saul Steinberg

thinkprocessnotproduct:

Saul Steinberg’s studio, 1959

Photographed by Inge Morath

Filed under: Saul Steinberg

Sep 09, 2013
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Mica Angela Hendricks’ collaborative drawings with her 4-year-old daughter

explore-blog:

Artist Mica Angela Hendricks collaborates with her 4-year-old daughter after the little girl peeked inside her mommy’s sketchbook and asked to contribute.

Some of the collaborative artworks are now available as prints.

Love this. When Saul Steinberg was asked about whether Klee influenced his work, he waved his hand and said, “We are both children who never stopped drawing.”

Filed under: parenting

(via braiker)

Aug 15, 2013
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Dec 08, 2012
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Saul Steinberg New Yorker Covers

Steinberg did 87 covers for the New Yorker. Eighty-seven! (You can see most of the covers and his illustrations in Saul Steinberg at the New Yorker)

Filed under: Saul Steinberg

Nov 25, 2012
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Saul Steinberg: A Biography by Deirdre Bair

Well, this just shot up to the top of my Christmas list. Here’s the NYTimes review.

Filed under: Saul Steinberg

Saul Steinberg: A Biography by Deirdre Bair

Well, this just shot up to the top of my Christmas list. Here’s the NYTimes review.

Filed under: Saul Steinberg

Jan 22, 2012
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Saul Steinberg’s Italian Years (1933-1941)


  The aesthetic persona of Saul Steinberg (1914-1999), who became one of America’s most beloved artists, began to take shape in Milan during the 1930s. Steinberg arrived there in 1933 to study architecture, having left his native Romania and its virulent anti-Semitism. In 1936, while still an architecture student, he started contributing gag cartoons to popular Italian humor newspapers and soon became renowned for his clever visual wit. These first years in Italy, which he would later remember as a “paradise,” turned rapidly into “hell” in 1938, with the institution of racial laws that deprived him of income, a profession, and a legal residence. Forced to live as an unwanted “foreign Jew” and unable to obtain the visas necessary to leave Italy, by late 1940 he was under threat of imminent arrest; a few months later, he spent several weeks in an internment camp before finally managing to flee the country.


Above: a 1937 drawing of Steinberg’s room in Milan.

Saul Steinberg’s Italian Years (1933-1941)

The aesthetic persona of Saul Steinberg (1914-1999), who became one of America’s most beloved artists, began to take shape in Milan during the 1930s. Steinberg arrived there in 1933 to study architecture, having left his native Romania and its virulent anti-Semitism. In 1936, while still an architecture student, he started contributing gag cartoons to popular Italian humor newspapers and soon became renowned for his clever visual wit. These first years in Italy, which he would later remember as a “paradise,” turned rapidly into “hell” in 1938, with the institution of racial laws that deprived him of income, a profession, and a legal residence. Forced to live as an unwanted “foreign Jew” and unable to obtain the visas necessary to leave Italy, by late 1940 he was under threat of imminent arrest; a few months later, he spent several weeks in an internment camp before finally managing to flee the country.

Above: a 1937 drawing of Steinberg’s room in Milan.

Jan 19, 2012
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Saul Steinberg, Autogeography, 1966 (via)

From “Descent from Paradise: Saul Steinberg’s Italian Years”:


  For most of his adult life, Saul Steinberg (1914-1999) drew maps—maps of real or imaginary locations, maps of words and of concepts. Often the maps are of actual places refracted through the artist’s mental constructs, as in View of the World from 9th Avenue, his famous March 29, 1976 New Yorker cover, which, reprinted as a poster, copied, and appropriated for many other cities of the world, became his personal nightmare; even today, it remains the icon that most easily identifies him. There is, however, another splendid map, completed ten years earlier; although intended for The New Yorker, it was never fully published in Steinberg’s lifetime. Entitled Autogeography, it is a bird’s-eye view of a green territory dotted with the names of many locales, large and small, from every corner of the world. A very blue, winding river flows through the territory, and on the bottom right it skirts a small lake with an island. On the island is the word “Milano,” while on the shore northeast of the island we find a locality named “Tortoreto (Teramo).”

Saul Steinberg, Autogeography, 1966 (via)

From “Descent from Paradise: Saul Steinberg’s Italian Years”:

For most of his adult life, Saul Steinberg (1914-1999) drew maps—maps of real or imaginary locations, maps of words and of concepts. Often the maps are of actual places refracted through the artist’s mental constructs, as in View of the World from 9th Avenue, his famous March 29, 1976 New Yorker cover, which, reprinted as a poster, copied, and appropriated for many other cities of the world, became his personal nightmare; even today, it remains the icon that most easily identifies him. There is, however, another splendid map, completed ten years earlier; although intended for The New Yorker, it was never fully published in Steinberg’s lifetime. Entitled Autogeography, it is a bird’s-eye view of a green territory dotted with the names of many locales, large and small, from every corner of the world. A very blue, winding river flows through the territory, and on the bottom right it skirts a small lake with an island. On the island is the word “Milano,” while on the shore northeast of the island we find a locality named “Tortoreto (Teramo).”

Jan 18, 2012
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Saul Steinberg lookin’ PIMP! with his girlfriend, Ada Ongari, Milan, c. 1937-40.

From “Saul Steinberg’s Italian Years”:


  Steinberg’s artistic persona began to take shape in Milan, where he arrived from his native Romania in 1933 to study architecture. In 1936, he began contributing cartoons to Italian humor newspapers and soon became renowned for his visual wit. But, in 1938, with the institution of racial laws, he couldn’t believe “the betrayal,” as he put it. “Dearest Italy turned into Romania, hellish homeland,” he wrote in a 1995 letter to Aldo Buzzi. He then went through a bureaucratic ordeal to obtain the many papers needed to leave Italy. Following an aborted attempt to take the Portugal route, he was briefly interned, before managing to finally flee the country. He embarked for New York in 1941. The surreal documents contained in his masterpiece The Passport gain new poignancy in light of his struggle through the Fascist bureaucratic machine.


The Passport is incredible. One of my treasured books.

Saul Steinberg lookin’ PIMP! with his girlfriend, Ada Ongari, Milan, c. 1937-40.

From “Saul Steinberg’s Italian Years”:

Steinberg’s artistic persona began to take shape in Milan, where he arrived from his native Romania in 1933 to study architecture. In 1936, he began contributing cartoons to Italian humor newspapers and soon became renowned for his visual wit. But, in 1938, with the institution of racial laws, he couldn’t believe “the betrayal,” as he put it. “Dearest Italy turned into Romania, hellish homeland,” he wrote in a 1995 letter to Aldo Buzzi. He then went through a bureaucratic ordeal to obtain the many papers needed to leave Italy. Following an aborted attempt to take the Portugal route, he was briefly interned, before managing to finally flee the country. He embarked for New York in 1941. The surreal documents contained in his masterpiece The Passport gain new poignancy in light of his struggle through the Fascist bureaucratic machine.

The Passport is incredible. One of my treasured books.

Aug 07, 2011
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Drawing by Saul Steinberg, 1950, a parody of the IBM THINK sign (via Will)

Drawing by Saul Steinberg, 1950, a parody of the IBM THINK sign (via Will)

Apr 10, 2011
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Saul Steinberg, “Trash,” from the October 27, 1986 New Yorker cover.  (via)

Saul Steinberg, “Trash,” from the October 27, 1986 New Yorker cover. (via)

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