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Posts tagged "signs"

Dec 05, 2013
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Bought a new sign for my studio.

Bought a new sign for my studio.

Sep 11, 2013
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Avoid Not Writing, from Edward Tufte’s Philosophical Diamond Signs

Filed under: signs

Avoid Not Writing, from Edward Tufte’s Philosophical Diamond Signs

Filed under: signs

Aug 04, 2013
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merlin:

bestrooftalkever:

I’m laughing a little bit too hard at this story.

While I doubt this actually explains the (admittedly funny) error,  I will say this: you do notice it. And, you do think about it. Which is more than you can say for most warning signs.

Back in Florida, there was a park near my house that had a “Speed Limit 9 MPH” sign. Every time we saw it, we’d laugh at how dumb they were not to post a ““normal”” speed limit that ends in a 5 or a 0.

But, then, we realized that, yeah, we did actually see it. And, yeah, we did actually slow down to 9 MPH.

Put differently, how many of the hundreds of other warning signs you saw in the month of July can you remember this clearly?

Nope. Me neither.

This reminds me of two things:

the study that came out that said if you want people to learn something, put it in a really hard-to-read font
Dan Pink’s collection of emotionally intelligent signage
Filed under: signs

merlin:

bestrooftalkever:

I’m laughing a little bit too hard at this story.

While I doubt this actually explains the (admittedly funny) error, I will say this: you do notice it. And, you do think about it. Which is more than you can say for most warning signs.

Back in Florida, there was a park near my house that had a “Speed Limit 9 MPH” sign. Every time we saw it, we’d laugh at how dumb they were not to post a ““normal”” speed limit that ends in a 5 or a 0.

But, then, we realized that, yeah, we did actually see it. And, yeah, we did actually slow down to 9 MPH.

Put differently, how many of the hundreds of other warning signs you saw in the month of July can you remember this clearly?

Nope. Me neither.

This reminds me of two things:

  1. the study that came out that said if you want people to learn something, put it in a really hard-to-read font
  2. Dan Pink’s collection of emotionally intelligent signage

Filed under: signs

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  • signs

Mar 13, 2013
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“It’s more complicated than that.”

Edward Tufte, Complicated: yellow, print on canvas, 29 ½” x 29 ½”, edition of 3

“It’s more complicated than that.”

Edward Tufte, Complicated: yellow, print on canvas, 29 ½” x 29 ½”, edition of 3

Feb 20, 2013
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    read more posts about:
  • signs

Jan 12, 2013
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Greedo versus Han Solo tip jars (via @hyams)

It makes me sad that Greedo’s is fuller.

UPDATE: @Hyams responds:


  . @austinkleon ah, see that’s the brilliant part. i think they dump the $ on greedo’s side to make you want to throw more in han. tip troll.


See also: Tupac vs. Biggie

Filed under: signs

Greedo versus Han Solo tip jars (via @hyams)

It makes me sad that Greedo’s is fuller.

UPDATE: @Hyams responds:

. @austinkleon ah, see that’s the brilliant part. i think they dump the $ on greedo’s side to make you want to throw more in han. tip troll.

See also: Tupac vs. Biggie

Filed under: signs

Dec 27, 2012
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Great sign by @sunnibrown's nephew.

Great sign by @sunnibrown's nephew.

Nov 13, 2012
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Oct 04, 2012
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Steve Lambert on making (good) work with a specific audience in mind

This was a wonderful video to stumble upon after my rant about Grizzly Bear and the ridiculous notion that making work with an audience in mind somehow “taints” your process.

Steve Lambert was like a lot of artists:

I never sold a lot of anything… I made work for my peers, for people on the street, and I made work because I thought it was important. I didn’t have the chance to sell stuff, so I didn’t really think [it].

But when he started showing in a commercial gallery, he started selling lots of work to a very different audience:

The people’s homes that the work ends up in are not my peers. They are of a different class than I am. They usually have some wealth because they can spend a few thousand dollars on an artwork that’s going to be in their house just because they like it.

And he got a little freaked out about the disconnect between making work for everyone and making work for a select few:

How did I get here? This is not what I was working towards. And there was this feeling that, “Just go back. You weren’t trying to get here, just go back to where you were before.” And then there was another part of me, which I think is the smarter part, that was like, “Wait, you get to talk to this group, this select few. And not everyone gets to do that, even if they want to. Don’t walk away from that.” 

So, instead of wimping out and self-sabotaging, he decided to take advantage of his new situation:

So, what do I want to say to this audience? If the venue is this person’s home, what do I want to do in that venue? And what I want to do is offer some reminders that they want, too…

The shift for me was realizing, “Oh, I can make work that people are going to live with, and not just any person, but a very specific type of person, and it gets to be there and be an influence.”

You can see more of Steve’s work at http://visitsteve.com

Sep 04, 2012
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Better Names for Things (via)

Behold, the power of captions.

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