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A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about. Ask me anything you can't Google.



Posts tagged "sketchbook"

Mar 20, 2014
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creativemornings:

Ways of Seeing by John Berger is one of ten books that made this month’s book list on March’s theme of Hidden, curated by the team at Designers & Books. These sketch notes are the work of past CreativeMornings speaker Austin Kleon, mapping out his experience reading it.

See the full list here. →

On of my favorite books.

creativemornings:

Ways of Seeing by John Berger is one of ten books that made this month’s book list on March’s theme of Hidden, curated by the team at Designers & Books. These sketch notes are the work of past CreativeMornings speaker Austin Kleon, mapping out his experience reading it.

See the full list here. →

On of my favorite books.

Nov 19, 2013
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One of Jim Henson’s designs for Big Bird (via)

One of Jim Henson’s designs for Big Bird (via)

Nov 05, 2012
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Gary Panter’s tips for starting a sketchbook


  For starting in a sketchbook, you need to jump in and get over the intimidation part — by messing up a few pages, ripping them out if need be. Waste all the pages you want by drawing a tic tac toe schematic or something, painting them black, just doodle. Every drawing will make you a little better. Every little attempt is a step in the direction of drawing becoming a part of your life.

Gary Panter’s tips for starting a sketchbook

For starting in a sketchbook, you need to jump in and get over the intimidation part — by messing up a few pages, ripping them out if need be. Waste all the pages you want by drawing a tic tac toe schematic or something, painting them black, just doodle. Every drawing will make you a little better. Every little attempt is a step in the direction of drawing becoming a part of your life.

Nov 01, 2012
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Pages from Keith Haring’s Journals, 1979 (age 21)

Oct 31, 2012
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Edward Hopper’s artist’s ledgers

I reblogged a photoset of images incorrectly labeled as “Edward Hopper’s sketchbook,” but the images actually weren’t sketchbook images at all, but a meticulous business record of paintings that Hopper produced and sent out for sale.

You see, Hopper’s wife recorded each painting he made in little books she got from the five and dime store. She asked him to do a drawing of the painting (which he did beautifully) and then she wrote the details of the painting below it, including the circumstances of the paintings — where they were when he made it, who were the models, etc. (Above, you can see the record for “A Woman In The Sun,” with the final painting below.)

The ledgers aren’t a document of discovery, but a record of production — in a way, the ledgers are a kind of visual logbook of the kind I describe in Steal.

This is another example of why posting images without context and attribution strips them of their meaning — if you see these images in a photoset labeled “Edward Hopper’s sketchbook,” you might think, “Wow, look how perfect his sketches were before he painted,” and you would completely miss the real story, which is way more interesting. (Always, always, always dig deeper when you see images w/o attribution!)

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Edward Hopper’s sketchbook artist’s ledgers

These are not Hoppers sketchbooks, but rather, a record his wife kept of paintings he made. Here’s the story.

(Source: anaarp, via franswazz)

Sep 23, 2012
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Sep 16, 2012
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wendymacnaughton:

Last night at the ballpark.

More of Wendy’s work→

wendymacnaughton:

Last night at the ballpark.

More of Wendy’s work→

Jul 08, 2012
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These sketchbook pages by Lynda Barry reminded me of this sentence I read recently: “quieting the mind so that God can get on with the surgery of the soul.”

Jun 15, 2012
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Tour Sketchbook #2 - Austin Kleon

I posted some scans of my tour sketchbook over on my site. Because I know people will ask, here’s the Moleskine I use.

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