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Posts tagged "steal like an artist"

Jul 18, 2014
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Everything has already been said and done. But, then, if this is so, why do we need more poems in the world? I once read a Jane Hirshfield interview where she said something quite wonderful. She essentially said we have to keep writing because it’s every generation’s job to put in the present vernacular poems that are called upon for rites of passage, such as poems read at weddings or funerals. I hadn’t thought of this before. Your ordinary citizen should be able to go to the library and find a poem written in the current vernacular, and the responsibility for every generation of writers is to make this possible. We must, then, rewrite everything that has ever been written in the current vernacular, which is really what the evolution of literature is all about. Nothing new gets said but the vernacular keeps changing.

Jun 25, 2014
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workmanpublishing:

#4 on buzzfeed's list of 37 Books Every Creative Person Should Be Reading

“If you ever find that you’re the most talented person in the room, you need to find another room.” —austinkleon

Get the book here.

workmanpublishing:

#4 on buzzfeed's list of 37 Books Every Creative Person Should Be Reading

“If you ever find that you’re the most talented person in the room, you need to find another room.” —austinkleon

Get the book here.

Jun 05, 2014
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“You don’t go into a museum and paint a moustache on somebody else’s painting.”

Mr. Don Henley (drummer/singer for The Eagles, with an estimated net worth over $200 million) doesn’t want people messin’ with his music. Henley recently sent takedowns to Frank Ocean and Will Sheff of Okkervil River—Ocean sampled the whole master track from “Hotel California” for “American Wedding”, and Sheff rewrote portions of his cover of “The End of Innocence.” His take:

“They don’t understand the law… You can’t re-write the lyrics to somebody else’s songs and record it and put it on the internet. I’m sorry, but it wasn’t an improvement. We were not impressed. So we simply had our legal team tell them to take it down and they got all huffy about it.

It’s a different mindset. I don’t know how they’d react if I took one of their songs and re-wrote the lyrics and recorded it, I don’t know if they’d like that. Maybe they wouldn’t care but I care. We work really really hard on our material. We spend months writing it and years recording it. You don’t go into a museum and paint a moustache on somebody else’s painting. Nobody would think of doing that.

(Actually, Mr. Henley, somebody did think of doing that, in 1919. But anyways…)

Technically, Henley is legally very much in the right. As Rolling Stone points out, “United States copyright law allows anyone to record a cover of any song without asking permission, so long as the musician does not alter the original.”

But to paraphrase Jeffrey “I hate the fuckin’ Eagles, man” Lebowksi, “You’re not wrong, Don, you’re just an asshole.”

Frank Ocean responded:

He (They) threatened to sue if I perform it again. I think that’s fuckin awesome. I guess if I play it at coachella it’ll cost me a couple hundred racks. If I don’t show up to court, it’ll be a judgement against me & will probably show up on my credit report. Oh well. I try to buy my shit cash anyway. They asked that I release a statement expressing my admiration for Mr. Henley, along with my assistance pulling it off the web as much as possible. Shit’s weird. Ain’t this guy rich as fuck? Why sue the new guy? I didn’t make a dime off that song. I released it for free. If anything I’m paying homage.

Will Sheff’s response was a bit more thoughtful, and very much in line with Steal Like An Artist:

I started noticing something [all my favorite artists] had in common – they all copied each other…. I realized that this is what artists are supposed to do – communicate back and forth with each other over the generations, take old ideas and make them new (since it’s impossible to really “imitate” somebody without adding anything of your own), create a rich, shared cultural language that was available to everybody. Once I saw it in folk art, I saw it everywhere – in hip-hop, in street art, in dada. I became convinced that the soul of culture lay in this kind of weird, irreverent-but-reverant back-and-forth. And I concluded that copyright law was completely opposed to this natural artistic process in a way that was strangling and depleting our culture, taking away something rich and beautiful that belonged to everyone in order to put more money into the hands of the hands of a small, lawyered few.

He then goes on to explain why he altered the Henley cover in the first place. Worth a read.

One funny bit that nobody’s mentioned: The Eagles themselves probably ripped off Jethro Tull’s “We Used To Know” for “Hotel California,” which sold over 16 million copies in the U.S. alone, and made them all millionaires.

May 27, 2014
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I steal from every movie. I steal from every single movie ever made. I love it. If my work has anything it’s that I’m taking this from this and that from that and mixing them together and if people don’t like them then tough titty, don’t go and see it, alright? I steal from everything. Great artists steal, they don’t do hommages.

May 18, 2014
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Steal Like An Artist and Show Your Work! displayed at the cash wrap in the  Matisse Cut-Outs exhibit gift shop at the Tate Modern!

Steal Like An Artist and Show Your Work! displayed at the cash wrap in the Matisse Cut-Outs exhibit gift shop at the Tate Modern!

May 14, 2014
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Your legacy isn’t something you always choose. Sometimes it’s chosen for you.
Alfred Darlington, better known as Daedelus, whose song “Experience” was remixed by MadLib for “Accordian

Apr 20, 2014
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I now wonder where the idea or of the ideology of creativity started. Shakespeare and company certainly stole from, copied each other’s writings. Before them, the Greeks didn’t both making up any new stories. I suspect that the ideology of creativity started when the bourgeoisie—when they rose up in all their splendor, as the history books put it—made a capitalistic marketplace for books. Today a writer earns money or a living by selling copyright, ownership to words. We all do, we writers, this scam, because we need to earn money, only most don’t admit it’s a scam. Nobody really owns nothing.
Kathy Acker (via botchedandecstatic) (from her very-hard-to-find-online 1989 article, “A Few Notes on Two of My Books,” published in the Review of Contemporary Fiction 9.1)

(via ayjay)

Apr 05, 2014
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I am not sure that I exist, actually. I am all the writers that I have read, all the people that I have met, all the women that I have loved; all the cities I have visited.
— Jorge Luis Borges (via chelseyphilpot)

(via gwendabond)

Mar 05, 2014
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I’m like a mockingbird, stealing from a bunch of authors at once, which people sometimes mistake for a distinct voice.

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it’s making something better by stealing something… In a way, everything is coming from somewhere, depending on how far back you want to trace it. It’s just where you want to take from along the way.
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