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A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "storytelling"

Aug 14, 2014
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Get someone else to read your story to you. Many say read your work out loud and this does help but I believe you still hear in your head what you wanted to write. When someone else reads it you stop hearing what you wanted to say and hear exactly what you’ve written.

Aug 05, 2014
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Opera styles of great composers (via ‏@grahamfarmelo)

Opera styles of great composers (via ‏@grahamfarmelo)

Oct 05, 2013
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Stories We Tell a film by Sarah Polley

“When you are in the middle of a story it isn’t a story at all, but only a confusion; a dark roaring, a blindness, a wreckage of shattered glass and splintered wood; like a house in a whirlwind, or else a boat crushed by the icebergs or swept over the rapids, and all aboard powerless to stop it. It’s only afterwards that it becomes anything like a story at all. When you are telling it, to yourself or to someone else.”
—Margaret Atwood, Alias Grace

This movie looks fantastic.

This movie is fantastic. Highly recommended.

Filed under: my watching year 2013

(Source: youtube.com, via austinkleon)

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The story before ‘The end’ — a conversation with Anders Nilsen

Death doesn’t really make sense. You can try and force it into having a reasonable shape and meaning that fits the human mind, but it will always resist. So if you can’t make sense of it the next best thing is to simply tell the story. Even non-sensical things begin to feel like they make sense when you repeat them over and over. If I had any advice to someone with a friend who just lost a loved one, it might be just to let them tell the story. Be available.

Nice to hear Don’t Go Where I Can’t Follow is back in print — it, like The End, is a beautiful, but devastating, comic.

FIled under: death, Anders Nilsen

The story before ‘The end’ — a conversation with Anders Nilsen

Death doesn’t really make sense. You can try and force it into having a reasonable shape and meaning that fits the human mind, but it will always resist. So if you can’t make sense of it the next best thing is to simply tell the story. Even non-sensical things begin to feel like they make sense when you repeat them over and over. If I had any advice to someone with a friend who just lost a loved one, it might be just to let them tell the story. Be available.

Nice to hear Don’t Go Where I Can’t Follow is back in print — it, like The End, is a beautiful, but devastating, comic.

FIled under: death, Anders Nilsen

Aug 04, 2013
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Every story now has to involve a threat to the entire globe. This is meant to raise the stakes, but it actually lowers them.
— Heather Havrilesky, “Stop Blaming ‘Jaws’!”

May 26, 2013
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Harvey Weinstein tells Errol Morris how to sell the work. Brilliant.

Harvey Weinstein tells Errol Morris how to sell the work. Brilliant.

(Source: filmzu, via gwendabond)

May 11, 2013
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Stories We Tell a film by Sarah Polley

“When you are in the middle of a story it isn’t a story at all, but only a confusion; a dark roaring, a blindness, a wreckage of shattered glass and splintered wood; like a house in a whirlwind, or else a boat crushed by the icebergs or swept over the rapids, and all aboard powerless to stop it. It’s only afterwards that it becomes anything like a story at all. When you are telling it, to yourself or to someone else.”
—Margaret Atwood, Alias Grace

This movie looks fantastic.

(Source: youtube.com)

Apr 14, 2013
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Mar 27, 2013
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Bradley Campbell uses napkins to diagram the narrative structures of radio shows.

What’s cool about mapping structure like this is that the pieces are moveable. You can rearrange the parts like they’re Tinkertoys. In the Morning Edition structure, for example, you could open in a scene, then introduce two people with other views (like the lines on the right of Bradley’s napkin only on the left). Then the “V.” Then a return to the first character and the lines again. Or, maybe you start with the “V” then meet a character…. See what I mean?

Fantastic. See also: Vonnegut’s story shapes and John McPhee on structure.

Filed under: structure, storytelling

(Source: wnycradiolab)

Mar 26, 2013
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"The cat sat on the mat" is not a story. "The cat sat on the dog’s mat" is a story.
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