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Posts tagged "tchoupitoulas"

Dec 07, 2012
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Tchoupitoulas: a film by the Ross Bros

My friends The Ross Brothers (their first film was the great 45365) are celebrating the theatrical release of their movie (after a successful Kickstarter campaign to finish it) which is getting insanely great reviews.

NYTimes:

“Tchoupitoulas,” a heady hybrid of documentary and dream, is a movie by and about brothers… It is alive with the risk and curiosity of youth, and unapologetic in insisting that the pursuit of fun can be a profound and transformative experience.

Popmatters:

…a portrait of New Orleans that is by turns poetic and poignant and rapturous.

I saw the film at SXSW last year, and had mixed reactions, but the images and the fantastic soundtrack have stuck with me. Like a lot of great work, it stirred my guts a bit because it was so different than anything I’ve ever seen before. It’s not a documentary — it’s a portrait of a place painted with real people but collaged together from different periods of time into one seamless night:

The Rosses take “documentary” to mean the documenting of an experience, and are more open about the misrepresentation of space and time for the good of the film than most other practitioners of their craft. Here, in what is no doubt a “documentary,” the filmmakers pass off more than half a year’s worth of New Orleans street life as the adventures enjoyed by three young boys over the course of a single night out.

I’m looking forward to seeing it again. These guys are on a roll.

Watch a clip then see if it’s playing in your town!

(Source: vimeo.com)

Mar 20, 2012
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We shot on two broken cameras with two empty wallets and ended up covered in an unreasonable amount of transvestite stripper glitter. We drank too much, slept too little, and broke the law. Things got weird. We stripped at a gay karaoke bar to Duran Duran so that we could get permission to film there. One night, we filmed a homeless man under the pier. The wireless lavaliere microphone picked up what our ears couldn’t and, the next day, we listened to him and his buddy plot to kill us…. We like things in motion, running constantly with camera in hand, chasing what’s sparkling. The camera allows us entry into these worlds and, as often as not, back out of them without too much bad news.
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