TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "teaching"

Jun 09, 2014
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How Non-Artists Can Draw: Comics Great Lynda Barry on Teaching Creativity | ARTnews

Teachers played the biggest role in my life and to be a teacher is to continue a certain kind of family line for people who don’t have families. It’s my way of being a mom. No, not a mom–the crazy auntie that everybody needs.

Pretty much exactly the way I feel about her.

Filed under: Lynda Barry

How Non-Artists Can Draw: Comics Great Lynda Barry on Teaching Creativity | ARTnews

Teachers played the biggest role in my life and to be a teacher is to continue a certain kind of family line for people who don’t have families. It’s my way of being a mom. No, not a mom–the crazy auntie that everybody needs.

Pretty much exactly the way I feel about her.

Filed under: Lynda Barry

May 02, 2014
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With the advent of computers everything has become more and more conceptual and we’ve lost touch with the realm of the tactile. Calligraphy is a way of getting back in touch…
Jean-Louis Cohen, quoted in this mini-documentary about how French schools teach handwriting

May 01, 2014
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Lynda Barry, Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor

For the past decade, Barry has run a highly popular writing workshop for nonwriters called Writing the Unthinkable, which was featured in The New York Times Magazine. Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor is the first book to make her innovative lesson plans and writing exercises available to the public for home or classroom use. Barry teaches a method of writing that focuses on the relationship between the hand, the brain, and spontaneous images, both written and visual. It has been embraced by people across North America—prison inmates, postal workers, university students, high-school teachers, and hairdressers—for opening pathways to creativity.

Syllabus takes the course plan for Barry’s workshop and runs wild with it in her densely detailed signature style. Collaged texts, ballpoint-pen doodles, and watercolor washes adorn Syllabus’s yellow lined pages, which offer advice on finding a creative voice and using memories to inspire the writing process. Throughout it all, Barry’s voice (as an author and as a teacher-mentor) rings clear, inspiring, and honest.

So! Excited! Comes out in October. Just pre-ordered the shit out of it.

Lynda’s class tumblr is the best. And Lynda is the best.

Filed under: Lynda Barry

Feb 01, 2014
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thenearsightedmonkey:

Dearest Students,

This is my own composition notebook homework assignment in progress. Professor Chewbacca reflects on the crayon experience. I’ve inked it and now I’m coloring it in

I like to figure out problems in my composition notebook using drawing and slow writing and non-photo blue pencil to help me with certain problems that defy being approached head on. I’ve found there is something to moving ones hand in a certain way — like a coloring way— while filling in a space and half thinking and half not-thinking about this something you are trying to figure out that invites possible answers to present themselves..

Sincerely,

Professor Chewbacca

Jan 23, 2014
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Lynda Barry’s course syllabus

I probably get as excited about Lynda’s class starting as her students do. Follow along here.

Jan 02, 2014
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The way you find a disciple in show business is you tell everyone, ‘Get the fuck out of here. I don’t need you. I don’t want you.’ And the kid who doesn’t go away, eventually you ask him to get you a cup of coffee. It’s the old rabbinic idea of, ‘I’ll teach you anything, just don’t ask me any questions.’
— David Mamet, Deceptive Practice

Nov 05, 2013
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The teacher is justified to lead students only if he is and remains a student.

Jun 15, 2013
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Ms. Lynda Barry is teaching two new classes next semester, and so, there are two new Tumblrs to follow: makingcomics2013 and imagelab2013.

May 13, 2013
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Jeremy Denk on piano lessons, mentors, and teaching

My wife saved me this New Yorker piece by pianist Jeremy Denk on his history of studying the piano, and his relationships with his teachers and students. It’s a fascinating (and paywalled) read.

He recalls being in school with a dozen teachers telling him a dozen different things (Padgett Powell: “What is one doing in a classroom finally but peddling his biases?”) and how he “slipped into the dangerous state of craving a guru, someone who would tie it all together.” When he found this guru, his “idea of music merged with the idea of him.”

On the complicated exchange between teacher and student:

When you give ideas to students, they tend to either ignore them or to exaggerate them. The first is distilled futility, but the second is grotesque: there is the student, trying to be you with all his youthful might. You look on with horror at this knockoff, this puppet—yourself to the nth degree as interpreted by someone who doesn’t know all the other parts of you. Then a thought occurs: what if this really is you, and that only through the imitation of this struggling student do you see what you’re really about.

He goes on to explain “how much teaching resembles therapy,” with the teacher simultaneously “destroying complacency without destroying confidence,” and how, in the end, the student must separate from teacher because “the only person who can solve the labyrinth of yourself is you.”

“Practicing…is not just repetition but concentrating and burning every detail into your nervous system.” […] Learning to play the piano is learning to reason with your muscles. […] You don’t teach piano playing at lessons; you teach how to practice—the daily rite of discovery that is how learning really happens.

cf. Robert Irwin, in Seeing Is Forgetting The Name of the Thing One Sees:

All the time my ideal of teaching has been to argue with people on behalf of the idea that they are responsible for their own activities, that they are really, in a sense, the question, that ultimately they _are_what it is they have to contribute. The most critical part of that is for them to begin developing the ability to assign their own tasks and make their own criticism in direct relation to their own needs and not in light of some abstract criteria. Because once you learn how to make your own assignments instead of relying on someone else, then you have learned the only thing you really need to get out of school, that is, you’ve learned how to learn. You’ve become your own teacher.

May 07, 2013
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That as we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours, and this we should do freely and generously.
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