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Posts tagged "terry gilliam"

Aug 12, 2012
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Terry Gilliam’s hand-drawn, hand-painted, cut-out pieces for the opening titles of Monty Python’s Flying Circus (via his daughter’s “Discovering Dad” archive blog)

Terry Gilliam’s hand-drawn, hand-painted, cut-out pieces for the opening titles of Monty Python’s Flying Circus (via his daughter’s “Discovering Dad” archive blog)

Feb 10, 2012
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My notes from Terry Gilliam’s 10 lessons


  3. Auteurism is out. Fil-teurism is in.
  
  Being an auteur is what we all dreamed of being, as far [back] as the films of the late ‘50s and ‘60s, when the idea of the auteur filmmaker arrived on the planet. And people kept using that term, and they do with my movies because I suppose they are very individual and they give me all the credit, so they say I’m an auteur. And I say no, the reality is I’m a ‘fil-teur.’ I know what I’m trying to make but I have a lot of people who are around me who are my friends and don’t take orders and don’t listen to me, but who have individual ideas. And when they come up with a good idea, if it’s one that fits what I’m trying to do, I use it. So the end film is a collaboration of a lot of people, and I’m the filter who decides what goes in and what stays out.
  
  4. Put your ideas in a drawer. Take them out as needed.
  
  I do have a drawer in my desk with all the ideas that I have and that I scribbled out. I put them in there and some day I use them. At the beginning of a new film, I often go in that drawer and look at everything I’ve done and see if there are some ideas that might apply to what I’m doing. But things grow, so I just start with a sketch and then refine it. And you do it with other people’s ideas coming in. That’s the fun part.


Zadie Smith has said the same thing about drawers.

My notes from Terry Gilliam’s 10 lessons

3. Auteurism is out. Fil-teurism is in.

Being an auteur is what we all dreamed of being, as far [back] as the films of the late ‘50s and ‘60s, when the idea of the auteur filmmaker arrived on the planet. And people kept using that term, and they do with my movies because I suppose they are very individual and they give me all the credit, so they say I’m an auteur. And I say no, the reality is I’m a ‘fil-teur.’ I know what I’m trying to make but I have a lot of people who are around me who are my friends and don’t take orders and don’t listen to me, but who have individual ideas. And when they come up with a good idea, if it’s one that fits what I’m trying to do, I use it. So the end film is a collaboration of a lot of people, and I’m the filter who decides what goes in and what stays out.

4. Put your ideas in a drawer. Take them out as needed.

I do have a drawer in my desk with all the ideas that I have and that I scribbled out. I put them in there and some day I use them. At the beginning of a new film, I often go in that drawer and look at everything I’ve done and see if there are some ideas that might apply to what I’m doing. But things grow, so I just start with a sketch and then refine it. And you do it with other people’s ideas coming in. That’s the fun part.

Zadie Smith has said the same thing about drawers.

Dec 22, 2011
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A Very Terry Gilliam Christmas: Season’s Greetings, 1968

Terry Gilliam on making the film:

I went down to the Tate and they’ve got a huge collection of Victorian Christmas cards so I went through the collection and photocopied things and started moving them around. So the style just developed out of that rather than any planning being involved. I never analysed the stuff, I just did it the quickest, easiest way. And I could use images I really loved.

Had no idea Gilliam was on Facebook! Merry Christmas to us.

Related: watch him explain how he does his animations

Nov 27, 2011
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I know what’s going on inside me—I’m not a fool. But I don’t want to analyze it, I want to use it.

Aug 04, 2011
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Watch Monty Python’s Terry Gilliam explain how he creates his famous cut-out animations.

This is so good.

Bob Godfrey: All you lazy people out there who want to get maximum effect from minimum work, I want you to meet…Terry Gilliam! Terry, what advice do you have for people out there who want to make films and animations?

Gilliam: Well, Bob, don’t. It’s dangerous, nasty stuff.

Cartoon Brew has context:

Monty Python animator Terry Gilliam discussing his animation techniques on Bob Godfrey’s Do-It-Yourself Animation Show in 1974. Godfrey’s show, which made animation accessible to the masses by taking the mystery out of the production process, was vastly influential and inspired an entire generation of kids in England, including Nick Park, who created Wallace & Gromit, Jan Pinkava, who directed the Pixar short Geri’s Game, and Richard Bazley, an animator on Pocahontas, Hercules, and The Iron Giant.

Money quote:

The whole point of animation to me is to tell a story, make a joke, express an idea. The technique itself doesn’t really matter. Whatever works is the thing to use.

Love his storyboards @6:52.

(via drawnblog > KC Green on Twitter)

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